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4 things NASA can teach you about a good night's sleep

Who knows about sleep? Astronauts. They have to. Their bodies are cut off from many of the normal external cues that remind us what time it is. But actually, it's even worse than that. In orbit they can experience a dozen sunrises and sunsets a day which makes their circadian rhythm go completely haywire. Show More Summary

Mysterious Mars Find Looks Like a Bone

First, Mars was thought to be invaded by jelly doughnuts. Now, some are claiming the latest photos from NASA's Curiosity rover show proof of human or animal life on the Red Planet. UFO Blogger first discovered what it calls a "fossilized thigh bone" in a photo snapped by the rover's...

The Earth's Ozone Layer Is Still Being Chewed Apart

If you thought that the depletion of the ozone layer was a problems of the 90s, think again: according to new NASA research, the Earth's atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of ozone-depleting chemical, decades after it was banned worldwide. Read more...

Why NASA studies the ultraviolet sun

You cannot look at the sun without special filters, and the naked eye cannot perceive certain wavelengths of sunlight. Solar physicists must consequently rely on spacecraft that can observe this invisible light before the atmosphere absorbs it.

GPIM spacecraft to validate use of 'green' propellant

Milestone progress is being made in readying NASA's Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) for launch in 2016, a smallsat designed to test the unique attributes of a high-performance, non-toxic, "green" fuel on orbit.

Ozone-depleting compound persists, NASA research shows

NASA research shows Earth's atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of an ozone-depleting compound from an unknown source decades after the compound was banned worldwide.

New satellite data will help farmers facing drought

NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission, scheduled to launch this winter, will collect the kind of local data agricultural and water managers worldwide need. SMAP uses two microwave instruments to monitor the top 2 inches (5 centimeters) of soil on Earth's surface. Show More Summary

Rare Midsize Black Hole

NASA: Astronomers from the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center have uncovered rhythmic pulsations from a rare breed of black hole in archival data from NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite. The signals provide compelling evidence that the object, known as M82 X-1, is one of only a...Read More

Ooops – According to NASA, ozone destroying CCl4 remains in atmosphere, and continues to be emitted

NASA research shows Earth’s atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of an ozone-depleting compound from an unknown source decades after the compound was banned worldwide. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), which was once used in applications such as dry cleaning and as … Continue reading ?

The Big Picture: NASA's electric plane achieves vertical takeoff

While EVs like the Tesla Model S and Renovo Coupe gain steam here on the ground, engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center are taking electric propulsion technology to new heights. What you see above is the GL-10 -- AKA Greased Lightning. This...

Ozone-depleting compound persists, NASA research shows

To investigate the discrepancy, Liang and colleagues used NASA's 3-D GEOS Chemistry Climate Model and data from global networks of ground-based observations. The CCl4 measurements used in the study were made by scientists at the National...Show More Summary

Despite FAA Setbacks, Amazon Prime Air Makes Notable Engineering, NASA And Aerospace Hires

Something big is going on with Amazon Prime Air, the e-commerce giant’s research project focused on delivering packages in 30 minutes or less using unmanned drones. And it’s not the dubious story about drone testing in India, which frankly, doesn’t pass the sniff test in terms of accuracy. Show More Summary

Watch These Awesome Super Rapid One-Minute Satellite Scans

When NASA launched the first weather satellite back in 1960, it was little more than two television cameras strapped to a satellite and shot into orbit. Fast forward through the technological explosion of the late 20th century, and now you can watch the evolution of storms in near real-time, one-minute increments from your living room. Read more...

NASA’s electric vertical-takeoff airplane takes first flight, aims to eventually replace the helicopter

It might look like some kind of crazy machination that adorned the cover of Popular Aviation back in the '60s, the flying machine pictured above is the real deal. Developed by NASA, GL-10 Greased Lightning is an unmanned hybrid-electric...Show More Summary

NASA sees Tropical Storm Lowell's tough south side

At 5 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, August 20, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that curved bands of thunderstorms remained well organized on the south side of the circulation, but strong showers and thunderstorms were lacking to the north of the center. read more

NASA Training 'Swarmie' Robots for Space Mining

A swarm of small, clever robots could be key to self-sufficient solar system exploration

ExoLance project wants to use tunneling darts to hunt for life on Mars

If there’s life on Mars, it will have a great impact on Earth. But to answer the question, a group of engineers want to make an impact on Mars. Explore Mars, Inc., a private organization made up technologists and former NASA engineers,...Show More Summary

Breakfast Wrap: Tuesday Night's Top Stories

NASA Wants You To Sift Through Its Astronauts’ Photos A chance to test your geography skills and help NASA at the same time. Google’s Awesome 360-Panorama Photo Sphere App Comes To iOS So much better than the iOS camera panoramas. 10...Show More Summary

Curiosity Rover Stalled by Slippery Martian Sand

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity may have to choose a new route to the base of a huge Red Planet mountain. The 1-ton Curiosity rover had been heading for Mount Sharp — a 3.4-mile-high mountain in the center of Mars' Gale Crater — via "Hidden Valley," a sandy swale that's about the length of a football field. Show More Summary

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