Blog Profile / Chicago Tribune: Health


URL :http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/
Filed Under:Health
Posts on Regator:2507
Posts / Week:5
Archived Since:March 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Plague outbreak now threatens Madagascar's largest cities

As plague cases rose last week in Madagascar's capital, many city dwellers panicked. They waited in long lines for antibiotics at pharmacies and reached through bus windows to buy masks from street vendors. Schools have been canceled, and public gatherings are banned. The plague outbreak has killed...

Thousands expected to wear bald caps in solidarity with cancer patients

Even in an era of tattoos and candy-colored hair, wearing a bald cap all day makes a statement. “It’s tough; people stare at you,” said Boston advertising executive Jeff Freedman. “Especially when you go to Starbucks or you’re on the bus, people stare but they don’t say anything, and then they...

Gynecology museum's 4,500 items tell an interesting and odd medical tale

"What are those?" I asked, pointing to an instrument that appeared to be a fork and a spoon joined with handles. "Those are salad tongs," deadpanned Mary Hyde, my guide through the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists museum. I looked at her quizzically. "Just kidding," she said....

In a breast-obsessed world, more women ‘go flat’ after mastectomy

When Laura Tuzio Ross told her plastic surgeon that she preferred not to reconstruct her breast after cancer surgery, he warned her she would regret it. “He said, ‘You’re only 41. You have the rest of your life ahead. Women wake up, and they’re devastated,’ ” recalled Ross, now 47, of Northeast...

We felt alone after our son's rare medical diagnosis. Then we found thousands of friends.

Being thrust into the world of rare medical conditions has been an unexpected part of my first year of fatherhood. William was born in January. He was perfect, 10 fingers, 10 toes and all that. But soon after his birth, I noticed that his head didn't quite look right. It was tall, narrow and long....

Microbes rule your health — and further prove that kids should eat dirt

Humans don’t rule the planet. Humans don’t even rule their own bodies. During the past 20 years or so, it’s become apparent that the guys in charge of everything are a nanometer across and run in packs, or perhaps more accurately, hang out in mobs. These gangs of microorganisms are together referred...

America's obesity epidemic hasn't budged, new research shows

America's weight problem isn't getting any better, according to new government research. Overall, obesity figures stayed about the same: About 40 percent of adults are obese and 18.5 percent of children. Those numbers are a slight increase from the last report but the difference is so small that...

Prenatal multivitamins linked to lower autism risk

Taking a multivitamin during pregnancy may reduce a child's risk of developing autism, a new study suggests. Analyzing more than a quarter-million mother-child pairs in Sweden, researchers found a link — but not cause and effect proof — between multivitamin use and risk of the neurological disorder....

New Osteoporosis guidelines, treatment offer options

It’s no secret that women “of a certain age” are at risk for fractures from osteoporosis. But less clear is what to do about it. After reports about serious, although rare, side effects — such as cracking of the jawbone — began surfacing about a decade ago, the use of osteoporosis drugs fell by...

Out-of-pocket costs often keep pricey new cholesterol drugs out of reach

Access to powerful new cholesterol-lowering drugs is so tightly controlled and patients' out-of-pocket costs are so high that fewer than a third of people whose doctors prescribe the drugs get them, a new study found. While highly effective, the new drugs cost as much as $14,000 annually, leading...

Being in shape may not protect your heart

Jason Lathrop was training for a solo backpacking trip in 2015 when he started to feel a creaking sensation in his knees during morning runs near his home in Portland, Oregon. Expecting to learn that he'd torn his meniscus or strained a ligament, he went to his doctor, who told him his knees were...

As America fights childhood obesity, more kids around the world are underweight

The weight problems that preoccupy Americans typically are about how to lose weight, not gain it. But a study published in the Lancet on Tuesday night provides a sobering look at how much the relationship children globally have with food and weight depends on where they are growing up. The study...

As Social Security gets boost, Medicare Part B costs to rise. Here's what to know.

Millions of seniors will soon be notified that Medicare premiums for physicians' services are rising and likely to consume most of the cost-of-living adjustment they'll receive next year from Social Security. Higher 2018 premiums for Medicare Part B will hit older adults who've been shielded from...

Sorting out the countless yogurt options, from Greek to Bulgarian

It all started with Greek yogurt. Once available only in specialty stores, in the past decade it has come to dominate the yogurt aisle in just about every grocery store. Its success has opened our minds and taste buds to yogurt's world of possibilities, clearing the path for other traditional takes...

Knowingly infecting others with HIV is no longer a felony in California

California lawmakers have passed legislation to reduce the penalty for those who knowingly or intentionally expose others to HIV without their knowledge, rolling back a law that mostly affected sex workers. The bill, SB 239, which was approved by the Democrat-controlled state legislature in September...

This one simple thing can help keep urinary tract infections at bay

Drinking plenty of water each day may have an unexpected benefit — staving off urinary tract infections, a new study reports. Young women plagued by UTIs who drank an additional 6 cups of water each day were nearly half — 48 percent — as likely as a control group to have another infection, the...

The dangers of double vision: I looked down, saw two left feet and keeled over

One late-summer day last year, my surroundings started playing tricks with me. The letters I typed on my computer screen looked fuzzy. Objects on my desk seemed to slip sideways, escaping their own outlines. My colleagues, viewed across the room, appeared to have shifted slightly so that now they...

Go ahead and order another slice of cheesecake

In the latest science shocker, researchers discovered that a number of people around the world are eating foods such as cheese, butter and full-fat yogurt without doing deadly harm to their bodies. This was treated as health heresy, yet this study's findings weren't all that out of line with previous...

Navy officer fights for right to try unproven drugs before dying

Matt Bellina was a 30-year-old officer in the U.S. Navy flying out of the Pacific Northwest to protect the country when he started showing symptoms of the deadly Lou Gehrig's disease in 2012. Now he's taken on a new fight: a law making it easier for terminally ill patients to get access to experimental...

Should you use protein powders? It's complicated.

Did you think protein powder and protein shakes were the domain only of the Arnold Schwarzeneggers and Dwayne "the Rock" Johnsons of the world? These days, protein shakes and powders are used by diverse groups of people that couldn't be more different, at least physically: elite athletes, post-surgery...

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