Blog Profile / Chicago Tribune: Health


URL :http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/
Filed Under:Health
Posts on Regator:2768
Posts / Week:5.3
Archived Since:March 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Preventive treatment for peanut allergies succeeds in study

The first treatment to help prevent serious allergic reactions to peanuts may be on the way. A company said Tuesday that its daily capsules of peanut flour helped children tolerate nuts in a major study. Millions of children have peanut allergies, and some may have life-threatening reactions if...

Drinking alcohol more important than exercise for living past 90, study says

Cheers to life — seriously. When it comes to making it into your 90s, booze actually beats exercise, according to a long-term study. The research, led by University of California neurologist Claudia Kawas, tracked 1,700 nonagenarians enrolled in the 90+ Study that began in 2003 to explore impacts...

Children's deaths from flu rise sharply amid signs that season may be hitting plateau

Flu has killed 22 more children, the most reported since the respiratory virus began slamming the country in the fall, according to a government report released Friday. The total number of flu-related pediatric deaths is now at least 84 nationwide. But other indicators from the Centers for Disease...

After a scary diagnosis, uncertainty can be the hardest part

Uncertainty has a tight grip on my throat today. The unknown, always lurking, is now an intruder pounding on my door. It's in my yoga class, where the teacher uses falling leaves to talk about how "uncertainty and impermanence are part of the life cycle." It's in my mailbox, where a catalogue from...

Caution: Cleaning this way is like smoking a pack a day, study says

Just in case you needed a legitimate excuse to be messy, there's a new study that says cleaning may actually be bad for your health. Researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway found that regular use of cleaning sprays contributed to a greater decline in lung function compared to those who...

Infant death rates are higher in rural America - but not for all causes

U.S. public health officials have long puzzled over a troubling statistic about infant deaths: Why is the rate so much higher in rural counties than urban areas? But their understanding of the complex factors behind the disparity has been very limited. A report released by the National Center for...

FDA opens new path for Alzheimer's therapy as failures mount

U.S. drug regulators want to let drugmakers test Alzheimer's disease treatments on patients years before the disease shows outward signs, and could approve the therapies based on subtle biological signals rather than proof they alleviate symptoms. The Food and Drug Administration proposal will...

Flu shot only 36 percent effective, making bad year worse

The flu vaccine is doing a poor job protecting older Americans and others against the bug that's causing most illnesses. Preliminary figures released Thursday suggest the vaccine is 36 percent effective overall in preventing flu illness severe enough to send a patient to the doctor's office. There's...

First blood test to help diagnose concussions gets FDA approval

The first blood test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries has won U.S. government approval. The move means Banyan Biomarkers can commercialize its test, giving the company an early lead in the biotech industry's race to find a way to diagnose concussions. The test doesn't detect concussions...

How a transgender woman breast-fed her baby

She told doctors that she wanted to breast-feed her baby. She explained that her partner was pregnant but was not planning to breast-feed when the child was born, so she wanted to take it on herself. The 30-year-old, who is transgender, was willing to accept the risks. Following months of hormone...

After polyps are detected, patients may no longer qualify for free colonoscopies

Insurance coverage of colonoscopies to screen for colorectal cancer is a frequent source of frustration for consumers, including a reader who asks about his situation. In addition to his query, I also address questions about Medicare premiums and delays in determining Medicaid eligibility. Q: When...

Therapy successfully reverses Alzheimer's in mice, researchers report. What does that mean for humans?

Brain plaques believed to contribute to Alzheimer's disease melt away in mice when robbed of a key enzyme, researchers report. And the rodents' intellectual function actually improved as their amyloid plaques dissolved from lack of beta-secretase (BACE1), an enzyme critical in the formation of...

High blood pressure? Potassium could help.

High blood pressure has received a good amount of press in recent months. New guidelines have lowered the definition of hypertension to a blood pressure of 130/80 instead of 140/90. In addition, the DASH diet, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, a well-studied, evidence-based plan, continues...

What to know about the norovirus? Stomach bug hits Winter Games

Norovirus, also known as the winter vomiting bug, has officials at the Pyeongchang Games scrambling to stop its spread. The bug apparently began spreading when private security workers at the games came down with headaches, stomach pain and diarrhea. A few basics about the virus: WHAT IS IT? Norovirus...

Cravings for sure, but can sugar cause addiction?

If you do an online search about sugar, you may become convinced that it's evil and addictive - and that your sweet tooth will lead you to ruin. You'll also see plenty of advice for how to curb your craving for sugary goodness. But what do we really know about how sugar affects us? Does eating...

LGBTQ health care: How to get what you need as concerns rise over new division at HHS

Health care can be challenging for anyone these days, but getting the right services is especially daunting for the LGBTQ community, which has faced decades of discrimination and misunderstanding. The creation last month of a Conscience and Religious Freedom Division in the U.S. Department of Health...

Tear-feeding worms infest Oregon woman's eye

Imagine going to the mirror and finding a small translucent worm crawling across the surface of your eye. The first of many. That's what happened to an avid 26-year-old outdoorswoman from Oregon, who recently became the first human ever infected by a type of eye worm previously seen only in cattle....

Marijuana's 4/20 holiday tied to rise in fatal car crashes

Marijuana users' self-proclaimed holiday is linked with a slight increase in fatal U.S. car crashes, an analysis of 25 years of data found. The study lacks evidence on whether pot was involved in any of the April 20 crashes, but marijuana can impair driving ability. Previous studies have shown...

How Skype is helping kids with autism

Three times a week, Kristen Lundstrom opens her laptop from her home in Carroll, Iowa and speaks to a speech therapist at UC Davis' MIND Institute about ways to help her 14-year-old son, Tyson, grow his vocabulary and better communicate. Tyson has Fragile X Syndrome, which is a genetic condition...

The importance of talking openly with kids about marijuana

Eighteen-year-old Kansas Citian Keyonna Brown said when she was growing up, her parents didn't talk to her about smoking marijuana. "Nobody had to tell me, I learned from experience," she said. "That's why I don't smoke. I get paranoid. I get scary paranoid." She and Jayla Wilson, 18, sat around...

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC