Blog Profile / LA Times: Books


URL :http://www.latimes.com/books/
Filed Under:Entertainment / Books
Posts on Regator:7578
Posts / Week:16.6
Archived Since:March 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Terry Tempest Williams thinks, breathes and writes deeply in our national parks

Terry Tempest Williams would like it very much if everyone could just take a deep breath. “Our national parks are breathing spaces, in a time when we’re all holding our breath,” the author and environmentalist says. In her new book, “The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National...

Emma Cline's 'The Girls' is a gorgeous, disqueiting spin on Manson family dynamics

“I was a daisy-fresh girl and look what you've done to me.” ? Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita   “The Girls” is gorgeous, disquieting, and really, really good. Set mostly in the Bay Area at the tail end of the 1960s, the novel follows Evie Boyd through the “endless, formless summer” before she goes off...

The blazing success of Yaa Gyasi's 'Homegoing,' a panoramic portrait of the slave trade's legacy

If you’ve been paying any attention to pop culture, you’ve probably noticed an uptick in slavery narratives, particularly in Hollywood. The most recent is the History channel’s remake of “Roots,”  the iconic 1970s miniseries based on Alex Haley’s book; the fall will see the publication of Colson...

'The Way to the Spring' is a sobering look at Palestinian life and resistance in the West Bank

The way to the spring…is blocked. At least that’s the case for the Palestinians of Nabi Saleh, a small village northwest of Ramallah. The expansion-minded residents of a nearby Jewish settlement, with the aid of the Israeli army that occupies the West Bank, have taken over the town’s water source,...

Duos of 'Genius': A. Scott Berg and John Logan, Colin Firth and Jude Law, Maxwell Perkins and Thomas Wolfe

The end of the story is this: Colin Firth and Jude Law up on the big screen, in 1930s grays, arguing about words on a page. The beginning was four decades ago, when A. Scott Berg was a student at Princeton wanting to write about literary editor Maxwell Perkins (or go back 45 years earlier, to Perkins’...

'Where We Find Ourselves': Juan Felipe Herrera's poem on the shooting at UCLA

After news broke that there had been a shooting attack at UCLA Wednesday, the campus was swarmed by law enforcement officers and we later learned that professor William Klug had been killed killed by a former student, who then took his own life). U.S. poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, who earned...

Bob Shacochis travels the world in 'Kingdoms in the Air,' but doesn't always enjoy it

Over more than 30 years, Bob Shacochis has gained a reputation as a swashbuckling, fish-catching man’s man capable of a certain kind of rugged reportage for Outside, Harper’s and other magazines. Not as widely known as big-hearted Bill Bryson, wandering Paul Theroux or the ravenous Anthony Bourdain,...

Helen Phillips talks about getting under people's skin in her new book, 'Some Possible Solutions'

In 1977, Marvel Comics created a series of superhero stories under the banner “What If...?” that allowed writers to diverge from continuity and imagine alternative possibilities for the characters in the Marvel canon. “What if Spider-Man joined the Fantastic Four?,” for instance. As I read Helen...

Donald Trump's reading list: books on Hillary Clinton and Richard Nixon

It's a standard question for presidential candidates: What books have you been reading lately? Most politicians have the answer in their back pocket, but it may have caught presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump off guard. He knew who the books were about, but he couldn’t think...

Literary pick of the week: Martin Pousson unveils 'Black Sheep Boy'

On Thursday evening, Martin Pousson launches his new book, "Black Sheep Boy," at Skylight Books. Pousson was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts creative writing fellowship to work on the book, which blends Southern Gothic literary heritage, his Cajun upbringing and his distinctive voice...

One of Kickstarter's most successful books, 'Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls,' has 13 hours left

"Rebel girl, rebel girl, rebel girl you are the queen of my world," Bikini Kill once sang. That song could be the anthem for one of the biggest book successes ever on Kickstarter, "Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls." With about 13 hours to go, the campaign for "Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls"...

Stephen King, Junot Diaz and 600 other authors want to stop Trump

Donald Trump might have captured the imaginations of millions of Americans, but it turns out that authors are a tougher sell for the presumptive Republican presidential nominee. More than 600 American writers, including Stephen King, Junot Diaz, Cheryl Strayed and Dave Eggers, have signed an "open...

Rita Dove's collected poems should put her back in the center of the American conversation

Although Rita Dove has won most of the honors available to an American poet — she was the second African American to receive the Pulitzer Prize in poetry for her 1986 collection “Thomas and Beulah,” and she served as U.S. poet laureate from 1993-1995 — she is less read and discussed, at least among younger...

ESSAY: What you don't know about Gabriel Garcia Marquez

When Gabriel García Márquez died in April 2014, Colombia's president, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón, declared three days of national grieving, citing the Nobel laureate as the “most loved and most admired compatriot of all times.” But the feelings in his hometown were a bit different.     “He isn’t...

The new book 'The Other Slavery' will make you rethink American history

It is not often that a single work of history can change the course of an entire field and upset the received notions and received knowledge of the generations but that is exactly what "The Other Slavery" does.  Andrés Reséndez boldly argues that slavery, not necessarily disease and misfortune,...

'The Fireman' may be the best apocalyptic read of the year, if you can stand the heat

There is a certain perverse pleasure in imagining the world going down in flames. But what if it was more than a metaphorical conflagration? What if your neighbors, friends, colleagues, or family could ignite without warning, starting a chain reaction that could send entire cities up in smoke?...

5 new books not to be missed

Five new books people are talking about, from the editors of the National Book Review. 1."The Bridge Ladies: A Memoir" by Betsy Lerner (Harper Wave: 320 pp., $25.99) Bridge, the card game, proves to be an apt metaphor for connection in this memoir about five Jewish ladies who have been playing...

Enrique Garcia Naranjo, on the importance of being Mexcellent

Late-night cruise down South 12th, stereo bumping "Forever Written" by Combine Vibes, and I’m on my way to eat tacos de tripas. Tonight I’m planting myself at Tacos Apson, named after the 1960s Mexican rock 'n' roll outfit of the same name. The spot is pinnacle Southside Mexcellence — equal parts...

A look inside the Creation Museum's cabinet of curiosities

The earliest natural history museums — the cabinets of curiosities of the 16th and 17th centuries — were always understood as reflecting the works of the divine, a “Book of Nature” to parallel the Bible. When Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher assembled his collection of natural oddities, scientific...

Mark de Silva talks about his novel 'Square Wave,' a paean to process

“Nothing is perfect,” Mark de Silva writes in his debut novel, “Square Wave.” “And no process, not at all, is really, truly stable.” In other words, progress is a myth, process our reality. Process — unstable, imperfect — is the true movement of the universe, a vacillation between zenith and nadir...

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