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Blog Profile / Savage Minds


URL :http://savageminds.org/
Filed Under:Academics / Anthropology
Posts on Regator:1556
Posts / Week:4.6
Archived Since:March 16, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Dude Guardians of the Galaxy is TOTALLY A METAPHOR FOR ANTHROPOLOGY

As I get older, I have less and less in common with my students and every fall I try to think back to movies or TV shows I’ve seen that might serve as a common reference point for us. I was walking to the library the other day wondering “What movies have I seen recently?” […]

Making archaeology popular.

First run in 1951, “What in the World?” was the Penn Museum‘s Peabody Award-winning popular weekly half hour television program on CBS in which a panel of experts would guess information related to four or five unidentified objects. This program was aired for 14 years and was wildly popular. The show began with an appropriately smoke/fog […]

Around the Web Digest: Week of August 10

Between the crisis in Gaza, the militarization of Ferguson, and the death of Robin Williams, this has been a rough week in the news. At least Rick Perry is being indicted. Also, as of today, I’ve been writing these digests for six months, and it’s been a blast. Thanks for your help and support. If […]

Anthropology at the margins: A report of EASA 2014

(This guest blog comes to us from Theodoros Kyriakides. Theo is a PhD student at the University of Manchester social anthropology department, currently writing his thesis on the political and subjective dimensions of thalassaemia in Cyprus. You can follow him on twitter at @bio_karneia. -Rx) I am reporting on the wrapped up EASA 2014 conference, entitled “Collaboration, […]

“O most magnanimous hat”

I’ve started an internship in the Special Collections department of Swem Library at the College of William and Mary, creating metadata for archival manuscripts. I ran across this one the other day and had to transcribe an excerpt to share, there are some ellipsis where the ink is illegible. It is a letter from a […]

Paperpile (Tools We Use)

About a year ago I wrote a long post that discussed both my general approach to working with academic PDFs as well as the specific Apple (OS X/iOS) software I use to manage my own workflow: Sente. I still consider Sente to be a kind of gold standard for reference management software, but there are […]

On Being Fed Up: Blackness, Resistance, and the Death of Michael Brown – [An Invited Post]

[This invited post is submitted by Discuss White Privilege, an anthropologist who has written extensively to refocus the academy’s critique of racism on itself. We respectfully ask that you review our Comments Policy before responding below. Thank you. –DP] I just read the Michael Brown post [by Uzma Z. Rizvi] while in a Black hair salon in East […]

Thinking about Michael Brown and the African Burial Ground

Michael Brown was only 18 years old; he was unarmed and shot multiple times. I am exhausted by this news. I cannot find words to express how such blatant racism makes a parent feel. It does not matter what we do for our children, it does not matter how educated we are, or what our politics […]

Who is a rioter?

As the community of Ferguson, Mo. reels from the shooting death of a young Black man, Michael Brown, at the hands of a White police officer it is worth paying attention to how the ensuing social drama that follows forwards conflicting interpretations by means of competing narratives. Shortly after Brown’s death a protest began to […]

Around the Web Digest: Week of August 3

Here are some stories that you might have missed this week. If you have any links or articles that you’d like me to include next week, please send them my way at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter @dtpowis, and I’ll give you a hat-tip. I should be getting back to posting the Digest on Sundays, starting […]

Geneticists think Nicholas Wade’s “A Troublesome Inheritance” is wrong

Ouch. Just….: Ouch. Over 130 geneticists have signed a letter to the New York Times saying that Nicholas Wade’s book A Troublesome Inheritance is inaccurate and misrepresents their work. This includes the authors of articles that are central to Wade’s argument. When the very scientists your book relies on announce that that book is wrong? […]

Philately as archive: Stamps on sale (for 22 hrs) on Ebay as counter-heritage

Earlier this year (2014), I was cleaning out my room at my parents place in New Jersey, going through old boxes, trying to make sense of decades of saved letters, newspaper articles, early printed emails, and old address books. During this time, I came across my first (and only) philately kit with the stamp tongs, […]

Competing Responsibilities: An Interview with Susanna Trnka and Catherine Trundle

(former Mind Thomas Strong recently participated in a conference on ‘competing responsibilities’ organized by Susanna Trnka and Catherine Trundle. What follows is an interview between Tom, Susanna, and Catherine on the conference theme, which dove-tails wonderfully with Bree Blakeman’s recent blogging on the concept of responsibility. Show More Summary

Studying Arabic in Wartime Israel

[The following is an invited post by Arpan Roy. Arpan is a student of anthropology and currently an instructor of English and linguistics at An-Najah National University in Nablus. His research interests are activism and dual narratives in Israel/Palestine.] I. Although I was instantly moved by the Palestinian narrative from the moment I learned of […]

A good article on ‘uncontacted tribes’

Over at the BBC’s “Future” website, science journalist Rachel Nuwer has a 2,000 word piece up entitled Anthropology: The sad truth about ‘uncontacted tribes’. The piece focuses on Latin America, but is refreshing because it manages to avoid the usual clichés about ‘stone age innocents’. Show More Summary

A roundabout way

[Savage Minds welcomes guest blogger Uzma Z. Rizvi.] In reading news about Gaza, Syria, and Iraq (among other places), I have been actively searching for spaces of humanity and hope in the world around me. Where is that space in which we trust other human beings, the people we do not know and may or may […]

Around the Web Digest: Week of July 27

Happy Monday, dear readers. (Yes, there is such a thing.) As I mentioned, I’m in the midst of an interstate relocation, so thank you for being patient while I take extra time to round-up what I can for the digest. I’ve been getting a lot of good suggestions and feedback on links to share. Please […]

Blame and responsibility: Concluding remarks [part four]

In the last post it became evident that there was some kind of mismatch between the concepts or understandings underlying the ‘responsibility process’ framework and the way that Yol?u consider and attribute responsibility. There are, in fact, a few key points of difference, which also make sense of the attribution of responsibility in the case […]

Barry Hewlett: The anthropologist who joined the ebola outbreak team

Anthropology surfaced briefly in the mainstream media earlier this week when NPR ran a story entitled “Why anthropologists join an ebola outbreak team“. It was a good story with some useful links. But I thought I’d dig a little deeper and talk more about Barry Hewlett, the anthropologist who joined the ebola outbreak team, his […]

Blame and responsibility: Part three

This is the third in a series of posts looking at the way Yol?u people consider issues of blame and responsibility. You can find the introduction here, and the case study, here. In the following, part three, I will work back through the anatomy of events in the case study using the Bernard Wiener’s framework for […]

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