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Blog Profile / Savage Minds


URL :http://savageminds.org/
Filed Under:Academics / Anthropology
Posts on Regator:1565
Posts / Week:4.6
Archived Since:March 16, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Around the Web Digest: Week of August 24

If, like me, you’ve been living under a rock this week, here are some things you may have missed. (From the size of this list, I feel like I missed a lot.) If you have something that you’d like me to feature next weekend, please send it to me at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter at […]

“Everyone was running little magazines in those days”

I recently went a conference where I had a chance to meet Nikolas Rose recently. I’m always interested to meet Famous Professors to see how they do it — what unique combination of personality traits got them, well frankly, tenure. Isn’t that something every academic should start keeping track of? I’m pleased to say that Rose’s success –as […]

Is the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge about structural inequality?

In case you have been living under a rock (or in the field, either is permissible for an anthro really) you may not have noticed that everyone and their mother is dumping ice water on their head in the name of ALS. Watching this fad unfold has provided Internet observers and other semi-employed persons an […]

Boasian Critiques of Race in “The Nation”: SMOPS 12

I’m delighted to feature this, our dozenenth SMOPS, for readers. These papers provide an excellent example of anthropology’s long term commitment to social justice, public outreach, and a critique of incorrect folk theories of heredity and race. The real gems of this paper are not Boas or Herskovits or even Sapir, but the sparkling, penetrating […]

The Trouble with Teaching (and a call for help)

This week, I embark on my 12th year as an adjunct at the College of Southern Nevada (formerly the Community College of Southern Nevada, which I much prefer — they changed the name in a bid to sound classier). For the last 11 years, I’ve taught intro-level anthropology, even as my career shifted from academia […]

These are a few of my favorite things.

Raindrops on roses, and whiskers on kittens. Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens. Brown paper packages tied up with string. These are a few of my favorite things. [Sound of Music (1965)] When Rodgers and Hammerstein first produced this song in 1959 on Broadway, they may not have been thinking about debates related to ontology – […]

Controversies that matter and controversies that do not

First, the controversy that does not matter: Beth Povinelli’s keynote at EASA 2014. The #povinelli hashtag failed to erupt on twitter over the weekend after being used about seven times in three days by Allegra, who posted an embarrassing critique of Beth Povinelli’s keynote  at EASA 2014 which focused on the style of her talk rather than […]

Around the Web Digest: Week of August 17

Here’s a recap of what you might have missed this week. If you have something to send me for next week, shoot me an email at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter at @dtpowis. Classes start this week for me, and I know they’ve already started for some of you. If you’re teaching a course with a […]

Dude Guardians of the Galaxy is TOTALLY A METAPHOR FOR ANTHROPOLOGY

As I get older, I have less and less in common with my students and every fall I try to think back to movies or TV shows I’ve seen that might serve as a common reference point for us. I was walking to the library the other day wondering “What movies have I seen recently?” […]

Making archaeology popular.

First run in 1951, “What in the World?” was the Penn Museum‘s Peabody Award-winning popular weekly half hour television program on CBS in which a panel of experts would guess information related to four or five unidentified objects. This program was aired for 14 years and was wildly popular. The show began with an appropriately smoke/fog […]

Around the Web Digest: Week of August 10

Between the crisis in Gaza, the militarization of Ferguson, and the death of Robin Williams, this has been a rough week in the news. At least Rick Perry is being indicted. Also, as of today, I’ve been writing these digests for six months, and it’s been a blast. Thanks for your help and support. If […]

Anthropology at the margins: A report of EASA 2014

(This guest blog comes to us from Theodoros Kyriakides. Theo is a PhD student at the University of Manchester social anthropology department, currently writing his thesis on the political and subjective dimensions of thalassaemia in Cyprus. You can follow him on twitter at @bio_karneia. -Rx) I am reporting on the wrapped up EASA 2014 conference, entitled “Collaboration, […]

“O most magnanimous hat”

I’ve started an internship in the Special Collections department of Swem Library at the College of William and Mary, creating metadata for archival manuscripts. I ran across this one the other day and had to transcribe an excerpt to share, there are some ellipsis where the ink is illegible. It is a letter from a […]

Paperpile (Tools We Use)

About a year ago I wrote a long post that discussed both my general approach to working with academic PDFs as well as the specific Apple (OS X/iOS) software I use to manage my own workflow: Sente. I still consider Sente to be a kind of gold standard for reference management software, but there are […]

On Being Fed Up: Blackness, Resistance, and the Death of Michael Brown – [An Invited Post]

[This invited post is submitted by Discuss White Privilege, an anthropologist who has written extensively to refocus the academy’s critique of racism on itself. We respectfully ask that you review our Comments Policy before responding below. Thank you. –DP] I just read the Michael Brown post [by Uzma Z. Rizvi] while in a Black hair salon in East […]

Thinking about Michael Brown and the African Burial Ground

Michael Brown was only 18 years old; he was unarmed and shot multiple times. I am exhausted by this news. I cannot find words to express how such blatant racism makes a parent feel. It does not matter what we do for our children, it does not matter how educated we are, or what our politics […]

Who is a rioter?

As the community of Ferguson, Mo. reels from the shooting death of a young Black man, Michael Brown, at the hands of a White police officer it is worth paying attention to how the ensuing social drama that follows forwards conflicting interpretations by means of competing narratives. Shortly after Brown’s death a protest began to […]

Around the Web Digest: Week of August 3

Here are some stories that you might have missed this week. If you have any links or articles that you’d like me to include next week, please send them my way at richard.powis@gmail.com or on Twitter @dtpowis, and I’ll give you a hat-tip. I should be getting back to posting the Digest on Sundays, starting […]

Geneticists think Nicholas Wade’s “A Troublesome Inheritance” is wrong

Ouch. Just….: Ouch. Over 130 geneticists have signed a letter to the New York Times saying that Nicholas Wade’s book A Troublesome Inheritance is inaccurate and misrepresents their work. This includes the authors of articles that are central to Wade’s argument. When the very scientists your book relies on announce that that book is wrong? […]

Philately as archive: Stamps on sale (for 22 hrs) on Ebay as counter-heritage

Earlier this year (2014), I was cleaning out my room at my parents place in New Jersey, going through old boxes, trying to make sense of decades of saved letters, newspaper articles, early printed emails, and old address books. During this time, I came across my first (and only) philately kit with the stamp tongs, […]

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