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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6487
Posts / Week:19
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Google’s Search Czar Just Smashed Felix Baumgartner’s Sky Dive Record

Google's search czar just broke the record for highest sky dive ever. As reported in the New York Times, Alan Eustace jumped from a balloon that was 135,908 feet above the Earth. The post Google’s Search Czar Just Smashed Felix Baumgartner’s Sky Dive Record appeared first on WIRED.

Visualizing Our Tech Worship With Giant Webs of Circuitry

For Italian artist Leonardo Ulian, this is our universe. At its center: a microchip. Beyond: resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors. Ulian’s “technological mandalas”—webs of circuitry in the form of the Hindu or Buddhist symbolic diagrams of the cosmos—are icons for an electronic age, and he’ll be exhibiting them this fall in Milan. Show More Summary

Regular Guy From Boston Decides to Map the City’s Entire History

A veteran EMT and ambulance driver in Boston, Ed McCarthy is in a great position to understand his hometown spatially. But he’s also a history geek, and while constantly driving around the city’s neighborhoods, he loves recognizing the streets, buildings and other locales from the history books he so often buries his nose in. Show More Summary

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Vampire Frog That Devours Its Mother’s Eggs

The frog they’d found wasn’t particularly remarkable. As far as flying frogs go, its feet weren’t as comically large and webbed as, say, Helen’s flying frog (which Rowley also discovered, and named after her mother). But once Rowley got a tadpole under a microscope, she realized she’d found the most unique larval frog on Earth. Show More Summary

The Futuristic Gadgets Running Today’s High-Tech Vineyards

Sure, the label on your Côtes du Rhinoceros suggests that the grapes were tended by craggy, distant-eyed, French-accented wine savants who nurture the earth, as did their fathers and their fathers' fathers before them. But the truth is, if modern technology can make for better vino and cut costs, plenty of winemakers are going to buy it. Show More Summary

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Wasp That Lays Eggs Inside Caterpillars and Turns Them Into Slaves

Few parasitoids are more bizarre or disturbing than the wasps of the genus Glyptapanteles, whose females inject their eggs into living caterpillars. Once inside, the larvae mature, feeding on the caterpillar’s body fluids before gnawing through its skin en masse and emerging into the light of day. Show More Summary

So Lockheed Martin Says It’s Made a Big Advance in Nuclear Fusion…

Making perfect energy isn’t so easy: Companies and government labs have spent 60 years being just a decade away from nuclear fusion. The post So Lockheed Martin Says It’s Made a Big Advance in Nuclear Fusion… appeared first on WIRED...

Science Graphic of the Week: Spectacular, Twisted Solar Eruption

Like many stars, the sun is prone to sudden outbursts. Erupting from the star's surface, these events sometimes sling globs of charged particles and sun-stuff in Earth's direction. If they're powerful enough, these coronal mass ejections can produce geomagnetic storms that damage satellites and disrupt power grids. Show More Summary

Italian Scientists Appeal Absurd Conviction for Quake Deaths

This month in Italy, three judges have a chance to undo the Kafkaesque nightmare that has ensnared some of the country’s top scientists for almost five years. So far it looks doubtful they will. In 2012, seven scientists and engineers...Show More Summary

Striking Portraits Bring the Bizarre Beauty of Marine Invertebrates to Life

In her new book, Spineless: Portraits of Marine Invertebrates, The Backbone of Life, Susan Middleton gives jellyfish, nudibranchs, and anemones (among many others) the type of photographic treatment usually reserved for sports stars and heads of state. Show More Summary

Travel Through Time With These Strange and Beautiful Visualizations of the Universe

What does the universe look like? How about the sun, moon, planets, and stars? These are probably question that humans have been asking themselves ever since we first looked up at the sky. A new book, Cosmigraphics: Picturing Space Through...Show More Summary

How Building a Black Hole for Interstellar Led to an Amazing Scientific Discovery

Kip Thorne looks into the black hole he helped create and thinks, “Why, of course. That's what it would do.” This particular black hole is a simulation of unprecedented accuracy. It appears to spin at nearly the speed of light, dragging bits of the universe along with it. Show More Summary

Fantastically Wrong: The Murderous, Sometimes Sexy History of the Mermaid

Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Mermaid is a heartwarming tale of a mermaid falling in love, battling evil to be with her love, and living happily ever after as a human. Just kidding. That’s the Disney version. In Andersen’s, the...Show More Summary

Software That Can Measure Your Athleticism Just by Watching You Jump

What can you tell from a jump? Quite a bit, according to Sparta Performance Science, the Menlo Park, California, athletics-lab-meets-software-startup that developed the tech. The post Software That Can Measure Your Athleticism Just by Watching You Jump appeared first on WIRED.

Why Bats Are Such Good Hosts for Ebola and Other Deadly Diseases

Some of the planet’s scariest, most lethal viruses find a natural refuge inside bats, including Ebola, rabies, Marburg and the SARS coronavirus. Many high-profile epidemics have been traced back to bats, and scientists are discovering new bat-borne viruses all the time. The post Why Bats Are Such Good Hosts for Ebola and Other Deadly Diseases appeared first on WIRED.

How the Super Bowl and Sizzling Fajitas Manipulate You With Sound

The Super Bowl isn’t just a game, it’s a cinematic experience. Minutes before kickoff, trumpets blare, as though armies were charging towards each other for a clash. During the game, sounds herald the appearance of onscreen statistics and instant replays. Show More Summary

Fantastically Wrong: The Scientist Who Thought That Birds Migrate to the Moon

In the classic millennial film The Mighty Ducks, which was so awesome it convinced me and my frail pre-teen body to become a roller hockey goalie (to predictable ends), the team makes use of the iconic “Flying V” formation when in a pinch. Show More Summary

What It Could Be Like to Live on Mars

Plans Courtesy of Blue Planet Research Bryan Christie Design I'd always wanted to visit Mars. Instead I got Hawaii. There, about 8,200 feet above sea level on Mauna Loa, sits a geodesically domed habitat for testing crew psychology and technologies for boldly going. Show More Summary

The Best Biology Photos of the Year

The winners of the Society of Biology's third annual photography contest include amazing images of a haunting leopard, an otherworldly spider, and Yellowstone National Park's Grand Prismatic Spring. The post The Best Biology Photos of the Year appeared first on WIRED.

New Book Explores the Building Blocks of Everything From Poison to Soap

Theodore Gray's new book, Molecules, is dedicated to exploring chemistry's building blocks on their own terms. The post New Book Explores the Building Blocks of Everything From Poison to Soap appeared first on WIRED.

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