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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6692
Posts / Week:19.1
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

The Craziest Sci-Fi Fantasies That Got Closer to Reality This Year

It goes without saying that the future hasn't officially arrived until we have flying cars and jetpacks. But that doesn't mean 2014 didn't see some awesome advances that bring science fiction closer to reality. The post The Craziest Sci-Fi Fantasies That Got Closer to Reality This Year appeared first on WIRED.

The Chemical Reactions That Make Hand Warmers Heat Up

What's inside Hothands Super Warmers? The post The Chemical Reactions That Make Hand Warmers Heat Up appeared first on WIRED.

The Best Shots of Earth NASA Took From Space in 2014

There are many great Earth-observing satellites circling the planet these days. Digital Globe's new WorldView 3 has incredible 30-centimeter resolution, and Planet Lab's flock of minisatellites may someday soon be able to image every spot on Earth, every single day. Show More Summary

Why Is Rosetta’s Comet Shaped Like a Duck?

SAN FRANCISCO—As scientists continue to pore over new images and data from the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, clues are emerging that may help answer a puzzling question: Why is this comet shaped like a duck? The comet consists of two lobes, which, if you squint, look a bit like the head and body of a duck. Show More Summary

Diabetes Patients Are Hacking Their Way Toward a Bionic Pancreas

How diabetes patients are breaking into their gear and bending it to their will. The post Diabetes Patients Are Hacking Their Way Toward a Bionic Pancreas appeared first on WIRED.

13 of the Most Amazing Things Discovered in Space This Year

Here are 13 of the most amazing things seen in space this year. The post 13 of the Most Amazing Things Discovered in Space This Year appeared first on WIRED.

On the Front Lines of Ebola’s Most Pressing Mystery

KENEMA, Sierra Leone—Alex Moigboi was panicking. He was preparing to enter the Ebola ward wearing just a pair of gloves and a plastic gown over his scrubs. It was totally inadequate—like a firefighter entering a burning building wearing a pair of Ray-Bans—and Alex knew it. Show More Summary

The Best Science Visualizations of the Year

Here at Wired Science, we're big fans of science graphics. And not just the fancy, big-budget ones, but charts and figures and visualizations: the folk art of scientific imagery. In this gallery are our favorite graphics of the year. The post The Best Science Visualizations of the Year appeared first on WIRED.

7 of the Ocean’s Strangest Creatures, Including a Fish With a Flashlight

This is the final part of a five-part series on the specimen collections at the California Academy of Sciences, and I feel like it’s only appropriate for us to return to our roots with it. So in the gallery above you’ll find the most...Show More Summary

Argentine Court Rules that an Orangutan Has (Some) Human Rights

An orangutan named Sandra has become the first non-human animal recognized as a person in a court of law. An Argentine appeals court declared on Friday that the 28-year-old great ape, who is owned by the Buenos Aires Zoo, is a "non-human person" who has been wrongfully deprived of her freedom. Show More Summary

Mercury Had Volcanic Eruptions Until the Planet Shrank

Mercury's shrinking may have abruptly squeezed off volcanic activity that once oozed lava across the planet more than 3.8 billion years ago. The post Mercury Had Volcanic Eruptions Until the Planet Shrank appeared first on WIRED.

The Best and Worst in a Tumultuous Year for Science

It's been a roller-coaster year for science. It started with what looked like a remarkable breakthrough in stem cell science, which was soon followed by a stunning announcement by cosmologists: the first detection of gravitational waves, direct evidence for a popular theory of how the universe began. Show More Summary

Mathematicians Make a Major Discovery About Prime Numbers

A year after tackling how close together prime number pairs can stay, mathematicians have now made the first major advance in 76 years in understanding how far apart primes can be. The post Mathematicians Make a Major Discovery About Prime Numbers appeared first on WIRED.

This Week’s Weirdest Wild Animal Encounters

A feral cat broke into a Russian airport and ate $1,000 worth of seafood, a black bear beat up a Santa Claus, and a tiger released into the wild by Vladimir Putin was caught on camera devouring a pet dog in China for two hours. The post This Week’s Weirdest Wild Animal Encounters appeared first on WIRED.

Running an Ebola Clinic in Sierra Leone Is All About Containment—And Chlorine

Treating patients with the deadly Ebola virus takes doctors, drugs, and a whole lot of chlorine. The post Running an Ebola Clinic in Sierra Leone Is All About Containment—And Chlorine appeared first on WIRED.

Our Favorite Maps of the Year Cover Everything From Bayous to Bullet Trains

Here are some of the maps we came across this year that captivated us with their brains, their beauty, and in many cases, both. The post Our Favorite Maps of the Year Cover Everything From Bayous to Bullet Trains appeared first on WIRED.

Absurd Creature of the Week: The World’s Goofiest-Looking Spider Is Actually a Brutal Ninja

The bizarre assassin spiders of Australia, South America, and Madagascar hunt other spiders. By deploying their jaws out 90 degrees from their necks, they can impale prey, inject venom, and let them dangle there to die, all without getting bitten themselves. Show More Summary

Satellite Map Shows Evidence of Dangerous Arctic Warming Feedback Loop

New research from NASA shows that the Arctic Ocean has been steadily getting more energy from the sun over the past fifteen years. The post Satellite Map Shows Evidence of Dangerous Arctic Warming Feedback Loop appeared first on WIR...

Science Graphic of the Week: Scientists Map Seaside Terrain at Titan’s North Pole

SAN FRANCISCO—Saturn’s moon Titan is a wet world, the only other place in the solar system that we know has flowing liquid on its surface. The colorful geomorphic map (above left) combines radar and topographic data of Titan’s north pole to show different features around a large sea called Ligeia Mare. Show More Summary

This Map Shows How Alcatraz Escapees Could Have Survived

Using a model of the tides and currents in the San Francisco Bay, a trio of Dutch programmers recreated the night that three prisoners escaped from Alcatraz. The post This Map Shows How Alcatraz Escapees Could Have Survived appeared first on WIRED.

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