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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6184
Posts / Week:19.6
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

These Are Some of the Oldest Living Things on Earth

Animals sometimes sleep inside the hollows of giant 2,000-year old baobab trees inside Kruger Game Preserve in South Africa. Humans too, sometimes use the trees, for more dubious purposes -- a jail, a toilet, a pop-up bar -- as photographer Rachel Sussman discovered when she toured the park to photograph the trees for her new book, The Oldest Living Things in the World.

18 Maps From When the World Thought California Was an Island

Glen McLaughlin wandered into a London map shop in 1971 and discovered something strange. On a map from 1663 he noticed something he'd never seen before: California was floating like a big green carrot, untethered to the west coast of North America. Show More Summary

Absurd Creature of the Week: An Ant That Skydives and Uses Its Head as a Shield

With a range stretching from Argentina all the way up into the southern U.S., this incredible genus of ants has also mastered the art of rainforest skydiving, leaping from the canopy to avoid predators, only to steer themselves mid-flight right back onto the trunk of their home tree. And they do it with remarkable agility.

Science Graphic of the Week: 5.3 Million Years of Sea Level Change on One Cliff Face

It's not often that we think about deep time. Lucky to live for a century, humans flitter like mayflies across Earth's surface, our own epoch an eyeblink in a planetary history that's largely hidden from everyday consciousness. Every now and then, though, that history punches right through into the present.

New Exoplanet Could Be Earth’s Cousin — Or Something Totally Alien

Astronomers are one step closer to discovering Earth Two. They have found an exoplanet slightly larger than our own, orbiting a star at a distance where it could have liquid water on its surface. But before you hop on a spaceship looking...Show More Summary

Scientists Discover Bugs With Sex-Reversed Genitalia Doing It for 70 Hours

Writing today in Current Biology, researchers for the first time describe a critter that has traded sex organs. Females are equipped with a penis-like structure called a gynosome, which “deeply penetrates” the duct leading to the male’s sperm storage organ.

What It’s Like to Spend 20 Years Listening to Psychopaths for Science

Kent Kiehl has been interviewing psychopaths for more than 20 years. More recently he's acquired a mobile MRI scanner and permission to scan the brains of New Mexico state prison inmates. He talked with WIRED about what's different in the brains of psychopaths and why he views psychopathy as a preventable mental disorder.

People Like Their Music Served Medium Funky

For all but the shyest of wallflowers, moving to music is a natural human response. But what is it about a catchy tune that makes us groove? Scientists think they’ve figured out at least part of the recipe: just the right mix of regular rhythms and unexpected beats. The researchers came to this conclusion with […]

All Your Favorite Spaceships, Compared by Size

There are a lot of online resources for information about space history, but none can rival the combination of thorough and adorable you’ll find at Historic Spacecraft. The site is full of information about recent and past launches, old space programs, and much more, but it owes its unique charm to the drawings of spacecraft that […]

A Patient’s Bizarre Hallucination Points to How the Brain Identifies Places

Dr. Pierre Mégevand was in the middle of a somewhat-routine epilepsy test when his patient, a 22-year old man, said Mégevand and his medical team looked like they had transformed into Italians working at a pizzeria — aprons and all. It wasn’t long, the patient said, before the doctors morphed back into their exam room […]

The Gut Microbes of African Hunter-Gatherers Surprise Scientists

In Western Tanzania tribes of wandering foragers called Hadza eat a diet of roots, berries, and game. According to a new study, their guts are home to a microbial community unlike anything that’s been seen before in a modern human population — providing, perhaps, a snapshot of what the human gut microbiome looked like before […]

Watch Live Tonight as a Total Lunar Eclipse Turns the Moon Blood Red

[HTML1] Tonight the Earth, moon, and sun will align just right to put on a celestial show known as a total lunar eclipse. Though you can just look up in the sky to catch the event, we’ve also got some spectacular live feeds of the eclipse for those trapped inside by cold, cloud cover, or […]

How Flesh-Eating Strep Bacteria Evolved Into an Epidemic

A new study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, details the evolution of a flesh-eating bacteria, group A Streptococcus. By charting its evolution, scientists hope to gain invaluable insights into tackling subsequent generations of these menaces, and to begin to better understand the very nature of epidemics.

If El Niño Comes This Year, It Could Be a Monster

Attention weather superfans: El Niño might be coming back. And this time, we could be in for a big one.

Animation Shows the Shocking Speed of the Washington Landslide

Scientists say it was the speed with which the landslide flowed downhill into the town of Oso, Washington in March that made it so deadly. This animation shows the slide's terrifyingly fast spread.

Absurd Creature of the Week: Cross-Dressing Cuttlefish Puts on World’s Most Spectacular Light Show

Cuttlefish are far and away nature’s most adept camouflagers, capable of observing their surroundings and perfectly adjusting not only their color but also their skin texture in just 250 milliseconds. And it’s not just about blending in: They can also launch truly bizarre displays of rippling colors to either intimidate rivals or hypnotize prey. Show More Summary

Science Graphic of the Week: Capturing a Super Energetic Neutrino Named Big Bird

You’re looking at a neutrino named Big Bird. This particle, which has an energy 1,000 times that of the protons smashed together at the LHC, traveled across the universe before hitting an atom at the South Pole and being recorded at an enormous underground observatory named IceCube. Neutrinos are tiny ghostly particles. Billions of them […]

Watch How Fruit Flies Avoid Attack by Banking Like Fighter Jets

researchers have recorded a remarkable flight behavior in the fruit fly species Drosophila hydei, they report in tomorrow’s issue of Science. When threatened by a predator, the spry critters can change course in just one one-hundredth of a second, rolling on their sides and banking hard. Show More Summary

Fossil X-Rays Reveal Daddy Long Legs Had an Extra Pair of Eyes

Harvestmen (also known as daddy long legs) aren’t spiders, and if you could (or wanted to) lean close enough, you’d be able to see one of the few physical features that distinguish them from their arachnid cousins. It’s in the eyes: Spiders usually have 6 or more, but the harvestman has only one set, tightly […]

Computer Model Crunches DNA to Identify the Most Distinctive Birds on Earth

Of all the birds on Earth, perhaps none is more unique than the South American oilbird, which 90 million years ago hopped onto its own branch of the evolutionary tree and has been on it ever since. The oilbird perches atop a new analysis of avian distinctiveness: how old each species is, and whether they […]

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