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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6399
Posts / Week:19.2
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Meet the First Woman to Win Math’s Most Prestigious Prize

[HTML1] As an 8-year-old, Maryam Mirzakhani used to tell herself stories about the exploits of a remarkable girl. Every night at bedtime, her heroine would become mayor, travel the world or fulfill some other grand destiny. Today, Mirzakhani — a 37-year-old mathematics professor at Stanford University — still writes elaborate stories in her mind. The […]

Computerized Noses May Someday Sniff Out Drug Money at Border Crossings

A chemical sensing company is working on a device that can detect the smell of money.

Fantastically Wrong: Ridiculous Mythical Critters Dreamed Up by 19th Century Lumberjacks

America has the most ridiculous mythical creatures the world has ever known. Hands down. Nowhere else has a mythology formed so beautifully in a perfect amalgam of too much whiskey, too little sleep, and perhaps some accidentally consumed magic mushrooms.

Whats Makes Mederma Scar Gel Work?

Lupine Hammack ALLANTOIN The headliner in this gel, which claims to “reduce the appearance” of scars, is allantoin, a nitrogen-rich waste molecule excreted in mammalian urine. It softens keratin, the fibrous protein that makes your birthday suit tough and waterproof. That smooths the skin and encourages dead skin cells to slough off. ALLIUM CEPA BULB […]

Best Annual Meteor Shower Hits Its Peak Tonight

Editor’s note: Come back to this post for a live feed of the shower from the Slooh Space Camera starting at 7 p.m. Eastern Time. The Perseid meteor shower is the champion of all such events. Appearing in balmy weather suitable for the most casual stargazer, the meteors dazzle the sky with an average of […]

How Isolation Units Contain the World’s Deadliest Diseases

The two American aid workers getting treated in Georgia for Ebola are isolated in a special ward that some staffers at Emory University Hospital call “Noah’s Ark.” But they’re not the first Americans ever quarantined for Ebola on US soil.

What’s Up With That: Why It’s So Hard to Catch Your Own Typos

The reason typos get through isn't because we're stupid or careless, it's because what we're doing is actually very smart.

A/B Test: Drug Overdose Treatments

Leon Steele Every 27 minutes, someone in the US dies of an opioid overdose. And all of those 19,500 annual deaths—whether from prescription pain meds or heroin—could be prevented with the fast-acting antidote naloxone. It adheres to the same brain receptors that opioids latch on to, pushing the dangerous drugs aside in five minutes or […]

Aerial Photography From WWI Shows the Massive Scale of Devastation

A gallery of images from The Great War From The Air shows the aerial photography that World War I's strategists used to gather intelligence.

What It Will Take to Win Google’s Million-Dollar Electric Power Prize

Solar power needs get a lot more efficient before it truly goes mainstream. One way to achieve that is with better power inverters—the devices that turn the direct current coming from solar panels and batteries into alternating current you can use in your home to play Xbox and keep your beer cold. Show More Summary

New Material Makes It Possible to Thwart Counterfeiters With a Single Breath

A new iridescent plastic that reveals hidden images with a breath is described in a paper published today in Advanced Materials. Researchers at the University of Michigan hope to use this technology for anti-counterfeiting purposes, replacing the ubiquitous hologram stickers used on things like luxury handbags and passports with a humidity-activated logo.

Absurd Creature of the Week: This Goofy Fish Poops Out White-Sand Beaches

Ah, Hawaii. The resplendent luaus and awe-inspiring volcanoes. Tom Selleck and his mustache running around private-investigating stuff. The beautiful white-sand beaches made of fish poop. [HTML1] Oh, that’s right. Your precious Hawaiian beach vacation was actually a frolic through epic amounts of doody. Show More Summary

Inside the Flying Quarantine Ward Used to Transport Ebola Patients

The Aeromedical Biological Containment System used to transport Kent Brantly, the American doctor infected with Ebola, had never been used before. Brantly's flight was its first real test.

Science Graphic of the Week: Inside the Eye Of a Glowing Shark

Hundreds of feet underwater, where dim rays of sunlight mix with flickers from bioluminescent fish, lanternsharks rely on their sensitive eyes to survive. A new study shows how their eyes have adapted.

Quest for an Ebola Cure Intensifies as Doctors Struggle to Treat Patients

The thing hampering efforts to quell the ongoing Ebola outbreak in Africa and treat Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, two Americans with the disease now at Emory University Hospital in Georgia, is that the FDA has approved no medications or therapies specific to Ebola. Researchers and laboratories around the world are working to change that.

A Day in the Life of NYC’s Hospital for Wild Birds

In a city famed for its oddities, New York City's Wild Bird Fund is a rather unusual place. It's the city's first wild animal hospital; since 2001 they've taken in more than 10,000 feathered patients---snowy egrets and starlings, peregrine falcons and pigeons. Lots of pigeons.

Fantastically Wrong: Why the Guy Who Discovered Uranus Thought There’s Life on the Sun

There are a whole lot of places in the universe that aren’t exactly conducive to the proliferation of life: the vacuum of space, for instance, or the poisonous, boiling atmosphere of Venus, or anywhere Chuck Norris goes. But surely the most brutal are the unimaginably hot surfaces of stars like our sun, furnaces so powerful […]

Second Ebola Patient Arrives in the U.S., Shows Signs of Improvement

A grey Gulfstream III carrying Nancy Writebol, an American aid worker diagnosed with Ebola, landed at Dobbins Air Force Base north of Atlanta Tuesday morning. An ambulance took her 14 miles to a special isolation facility at Emory University Hospital that was designed not just to treat the worst diseases, but to make sure those diseases don’t get any farther than its walls.

What’s Up With That: Your Best Thinking Seems to Happen in the Shower

You’re in the shower. The water sounds like a gentle, rainy static, and feels like a Plinko massage. You’ve just started to lather up and suddenly, you’re hit with a flash of brilliance. Maybe it’s the answer to a vexing problem at work, the location of your lost USB drive, or perhaps it’s just a random, inconsequential […]

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