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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6749
Posts / Week:19
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Fantastically Wrong: The Silly Theory That Almost Kept Darwin From Going on His Famous Voyage

The other day I had what could be considered a bit of an … overreaction. On a crowded train during my morning commute to WIRED there was an old lady who looked kinda mean sitting with her purse splayed on the seat next to her. What a...Show More Summary

What’s Up With That: Birds Bob Their Heads When They Walk

Birds, like chickens and pigeons, bob their heads so the world won't be a blur when they walk. The post What’s Up With That: Birds Bob Their Heads When They Walk appeared first on WIRED.

Physicists Conjure Curves From Flat Surfaces Using Japanese Folding Art

Try gift-wrapping a soccer ball, and you will quickly encounter the geometric abyss between paper’s inherent flatness and a sphere’s natural curves. The post Physicists Conjure Curves From Flat Surfaces Using Japanese Folding Art appeared first on WIRED.

Charted: The Tricky Trade-Offs of Cancer Screenings and Treatments

Mammograms cut your risk of dying from breast cancer by 20 percent! That's good. But you have a 10 percent chance of being sent on for a biopsy that reveals the scan to be a false positive (ouch)! Or it can lead to unnecessary, unpleasant treatment (ugh). Show More Summary

Why Elon Musk Doesn’t Mind That His Rocket Crashed Into His Robot Boat

All things considered, for the first try, the Falcon could’ve done worse. Technically, Falcon did hit its target—just at the wrong angle, and a bit off-center. The post Why Elon Musk Doesn’t Mind That His Rocket Crashed Into His Robot Boat appeared first on WIRED.

The Best Bet for Alien Life May Be in Planetary Systems Very Different From Ours

In the hunt for extraterrestrial life, scientists started by searching for a world orbiting a star just like the sun. After all, the steady warmth of that glowing yellow ball in the sky makes life on Earth possible. But as astronomers...Show More Summary

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Beautiful Octopus Whose Sex Is All About Dismemberment

In Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, the crew of the Nautilus takes a break from going for swims and pissing off native islanders to admire an armada of strange beasts floating along the surface, swimming backwards by blasting water out of their bodies. Show More Summary

Science Graphic of the Week: Perrenial Arctic Sea Ice Continues to Shrink

A new video from NASA's Science Visualization Studio lets track the spiky, yet steady, decline of Arctic sea ice. The post Science Graphic of the Week: Perrenial Arctic Sea Ice Continues to Shrink appeared first on WIRED.

Strange Antique Medical Devices That Promised to Cure Everything With Electricity

Friend, have you felt your manly vigor waning? Have you experienced shaky nerves or sexual debility? Fear not! A cure is at hand. Experience the restorative virtues of Dr. Sanden's electric belt, guaranteed to enliven the elements of manhood and make the bodily organs strong, vigorous, and free of pain. Show More Summary

Donde No Existen Redes Celulares, La Gente Está Construyendo las Suyas

Editor’s note: This article is also available in English. Dentro de la nube que está cubriendo perpetuamente el pequeño pueblo de San Juan Yaee, Oaxaca, Raúl Hernández Santiago se pone en cuclillas en el techo del ayuntamiento y comienza a taladrar. Show More Summary

Where Cellular Networks Don’t Exist, People Are Building Their Own

Without a network, a cell phone doesn’t really know how to do anything. And by and large, that network is provided—and, therefore, controlled—by a company that wants to make a profit off its subscribers. If there aren’t enough subscribers in a particular region, cellular providers simply refuse to install their infrastructure there. Show More Summary

Fantastically Wrong: Why So Many People Think They’ve Seen Ghost Dogs With Glowing Eyes

At the height of World War II, a four-year-old British girl was sent to bed but could not sleep. Sitting on edge of her bed, fiddling with its ornamental knobs and staring out the window, the girl heard a scratching noise. Then, outShow More Summary

What’s Up With That: How Squinting Helps You See Better

People often squint to try to see better. Why is that? The post What’s Up With That: How Squinting Helps You See Better appeared first on WIRED.

Cartographic Arts: Beautiful Maps From the Atlas of Design

Many of the maps that go viral on the internet make professional mapmakers cringe due to terrible color schemes, landmass-distorting projections, and amateurish composition. You won’t find any of that nonsense here. The maps in this gallery were selected by a panel of cartographers and designers for the second volume of the Atlas of Design. Show More Summary

Stephen Hawking on Black Holes and Why He’d Be a Good Bond Villain

Stephen Hawking always starts his lectures with the same quip: “Can you hear me?” His characteristic delivery, a blend of humor and complicated theoretical physics, is the kind of performance that Hawking, 72, is now well known for,Show More Summary

How Intel Gave Stephen Hawking a Voice

Stephen Hawking first met Gordon Moore, the cofounder of Intel, at a conference in 1997. Moore noticed that Hawking’s computer, which he used to communicate, had an AMD processor and asked him if he preferred instead a “real computer” with an Intel micro-processor. Show More Summary

Geologists Are Going to Measure Seattle Seahawk Fans’ Feetquake

Geologists have installed earthquake sensors to measure the rowdy rumblings of Seattle Seahawks fans. The post Geologists Are Going to Measure Seattle Seahawk Fans’ Feetquake appeared first on WIRED.

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Tiny, Giant-Eyed Primate That Was Probably the Inspiration for Yoda

What I’m about to say could well ignite sectarian conflict within the Star Wars fan community, but I’m pretty sure I know what the inspiration for Yoda was. It was a tiny, wide-eyed, positively adorable primate that bounds around the forests of Indonesia and the Philippines and Borneo: the tarsier. Show More Summary

Science Graphic of the Week: Mesmerizing Animation Shows the Turbulent Weather at the Edge of Space

A supercomputer-powered simulation shows how thunderstorms, jet streams, and cyclones affect the weather at the edge of space. The post Science Graphic of the Week: Mesmerizing Animation Shows the Turbulent Weather at the Edge of Space appeared first on WIRED.

Adventures in Mapmaking: Mapping a Fracking Boom in North Dakota

As a journalist digging into the long-term potential for shale oil—how much oil it might supply, and at what economic and environmental costs—I wanted to create a map showing the extent of this drilling boom to help me look for trends. In this post, I’ll explain how I did that. The post Adventures in Mapmaking: Mapping a Fracking Boom in North Dakota appeared first on WIRED.

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