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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6416
Posts / Week:19.2
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Aerial Photography From WWI Shows the Massive Scale of Devastation

A gallery of images from The Great War From The Air shows the aerial photography that World War I's strategists used to gather intelligence.

What It Will Take to Win Google’s Million-Dollar Electric Power Prize

Solar power needs get a lot more efficient before it truly goes mainstream. One way to achieve that is with better power inverters—the devices that turn the direct current coming from solar panels and batteries into alternating current you can use in your home to play Xbox and keep your beer cold. Show More Summary

New Material Makes It Possible to Thwart Counterfeiters With a Single Breath

A new iridescent plastic that reveals hidden images with a breath is described in a paper published today in Advanced Materials. Researchers at the University of Michigan hope to use this technology for anti-counterfeiting purposes, replacing the ubiquitous hologram stickers used on things like luxury handbags and passports with a humidity-activated logo.

Absurd Creature of the Week: This Goofy Fish Poops Out White-Sand Beaches

Ah, Hawaii. The resplendent luaus and awe-inspiring volcanoes. Tom Selleck and his mustache running around private-investigating stuff. The beautiful white-sand beaches made of fish poop. [HTML1] Oh, that’s right. Your precious Hawaiian beach vacation was actually a frolic through epic amounts of doody. Show More Summary

Inside the Flying Quarantine Ward Used to Transport Ebola Patients

The Aeromedical Biological Containment System used to transport Kent Brantly, the American doctor infected with Ebola, had never been used before. Brantly's flight was its first real test.

Science Graphic of the Week: Inside the Eye Of a Glowing Shark

Hundreds of feet underwater, where dim rays of sunlight mix with flickers from bioluminescent fish, lanternsharks rely on their sensitive eyes to survive. A new study shows how their eyes have adapted.

Quest for an Ebola Cure Intensifies as Doctors Struggle to Treat Patients

The thing hampering efforts to quell the ongoing Ebola outbreak in Africa and treat Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, two Americans with the disease now at Emory University Hospital in Georgia, is that the FDA has approved no medications or therapies specific to Ebola. Researchers and laboratories around the world are working to change that.

A Day in the Life of NYC’s Hospital for Wild Birds

In a city famed for its oddities, New York City's Wild Bird Fund is a rather unusual place. It's the city's first wild animal hospital; since 2001 they've taken in more than 10,000 feathered patients---snowy egrets and starlings, peregrine falcons and pigeons. Lots of pigeons.

Fantastically Wrong: Why the Guy Who Discovered Uranus Thought There’s Life on the Sun

There are a whole lot of places in the universe that aren’t exactly conducive to the proliferation of life: the vacuum of space, for instance, or the poisonous, boiling atmosphere of Venus, or anywhere Chuck Norris goes. But surely the most brutal are the unimaginably hot surfaces of stars like our sun, furnaces so powerful […]

Second Ebola Patient Arrives in the U.S., Shows Signs of Improvement

A grey Gulfstream III carrying Nancy Writebol, an American aid worker diagnosed with Ebola, landed at Dobbins Air Force Base north of Atlanta Tuesday morning. An ambulance took her 14 miles to a special isolation facility at Emory University Hospital that was designed not just to treat the worst diseases, but to make sure those diseases don’t get any farther than its walls.

What’s Up With That: Your Best Thinking Seems to Happen in the Shower

You’re in the shower. The water sounds like a gentle, rainy static, and feels like a Plinko massage. You’ve just started to lather up and suddenly, you’re hit with a flash of brilliance. Maybe it’s the answer to a vexing problem at work, the location of your lost USB drive, or perhaps it’s just a random, inconsequential […]

Bee-Killing Pesticides Found in Midwest Rivers

Pesticides linked to declining bee and bird populations have been found in streams and rivers across the upper midwest, raising yet more concerns about these chemicals' environmental effects.

WIRED Space Photo of the Day for August 2014

Follow Space Photo of the Day on Twitter The 2013 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery The 2012 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery For caption information and links to high-resolution images, please use the full-screen version of this gallery. For more mind-blowing space photos, see the entire WIRED Space Photo of the […]

The Oculus Rift Made Me Believe I Could Fly

Yesterday, I flew over downtown San Francisco. I swooped past the Transamerica Pyramid, taking care not to get speared, and winged it out towards the water. A heavy fog covered the bay, as usual, so I decided to head back into the city. I dove sharply, and the wind started whipping across my face. I […]

How Life Made the Leap From Single Cells to Multicellular Animals

For billions of years, single-celled creatures had the planet to themselves, floating through the oceans in solitary bliss. Some microorganisms attempted multicellular arrangements, forming small sheets or filaments of cells. But these ventures hit dead ends. Show More Summary

Airplanes Don’t Spread Disease Nearly as Much as You Think

The air in airplanes is way fresher than you may think, and it’s constantly being scrubbed by high quality filters.

Next Mars Rover Will Have Better Lasers and X-Ray Vision

NASA announced today that its next Mars rover will have advanced cameras, more sophisticated lasers, and the ability to see underground as it explores the Red Planet starting in 2020. The mission, currently being called the Mars 2020 rover (until NASA can give it a better name), is a twin of the Curiosity rover currently […]

Scientists Uncover a Surprising World of Microbes in Cheese Rind

The rind of good cheese is a thriving microbial community. A single gram—a tiny crumb—of cheese rind contains 10 billion microbial cells, a mix of bacteria and fungi that contribute delicious and sometimes funky flavors. But even though humans have been making cheese for thousands of years, we know very little about what all those […]

Science Graphic of the Week: Jupiter’s Huge, Crazy Magnetic Field

The image above shows a simulation of Jupiter’s magnetic field, whose intricate complexities make it extremely difficult to accurately model. While it may look like the gas giant is vomiting up some enormous space worms, the visualization is actually capturing details of the gas giant’s magnetism with greater precision than ever before. Everything’s bigger about […]

9 Things to Know About Reviving the Recently Dead

In 1986, a two-and-a-half year-old girl named Michelle Funk fell into a stream and drowned. By the time paramedics found her, she hadn’t been breathing for more than an hour. Her heart was stopped. In other words, she was dead. Somewhat inexplicably, the paramedics continued to work on her, and so did doctors in the […]

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