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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6690
Posts / Week:19.1
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Scientists Finally Find and Map San Francisco’s Most Famous Shipwreck

Scientists have found the SS City of Rio de Janeiro, the most famous of San Francisco’s many lost ships, and produced 3-D sonar maps of the wreck. The post Scientists Finally Find and Map San Francisco’s Most Famous Shipwreck appeared first on WIRED.

Science Graphic of the Week: 3-D Cutaway Video of Super Typhoon Hagupit

A satellite-derived video of the massive typhoon that tore through the Philippines last week. The post Science Graphic of the Week: 3-D Cutaway Video of Super Typhoon Hagupit appeared first on WIRED.

The Fastest Stars in the Universe May Approach Light Speed

Merging black holes can fling stars out of galaxies at near the speed of light. The post The Fastest Stars in the Universe May Approach Light Speed appeared first on WIRED.

Blood-Squirting Lizards and More Awesome Reptiles and Amphibians

I remember my first newt fondly. I named him Gingrich, because I grew up in the ‘90s and I thought I was clever—so sue me. When he died, I buried him in the backyard, lacking the means to preserve him so I might remember him properly. So when I had the opportunity to tour the […] The post Blood-Squirting Lizards and More Awesome Reptiles and Amphibians appeared first on WIRED.

Rosetta Comet Mission Reveals Clues About the Origin of Earth’s Water

One of the theories for how Earth became a watery world suitable for life now faces doubt, according to the latest results from the Rosetta spacecraft that’s now orbiting a comet 326 million miles away. Countless comet impacts were thought...Show More Summary

Fantastically Wrong: The Scientist Who Thought 22 Trillion Aliens Live in Our Solar System

In 1837, the Scottish scientist Thomas Dick had a big idea. A really, really big idea: Build “a huge triangle or ellipsis of many miles in extent, in Siberia or any other country.” He figured that because there are some 22 trillion aliens...Show More Summary

13 Holiday Gifts That’ll Delight Your Favorite Science Nerd

From a pyrotechnics chemistry kit to a DIY submersible, here is our holiday wish-list for science nerds. The post 13 Holiday Gifts That’ll Delight Your Favorite Science Nerd appeared first on WIRED.

25 of Most Interesting Photos of Earth From Space This Year

There are a lot of satellites surrounding our planet, observing and imaging its surface. But some of the sharpest, most capable among them belong to Digital Globe. Now, the company has released 25 of their best shots of 2014 for you to judge. Show More Summary

What’s Up With That: Why Running Hurts Every Part of Your Body

There's a biological explanation for why running feels so sucky for people who are just getting started. The post What’s Up With That: Why Running Hurts Every Part of Your Body appeared first on WIRED.

The Fascinating Treasures Locked Away at California’s Best Science Museum

Ace WIRED photographer Josh Valcarcel and I spent some 15 hours touring the stacks with the California Academy of Sciences' many curators, and over the next three weeks we’ll be bringing you the most amazing critters we found in the collections. Show More Summary

In Sierra Leone, Nurses Who Survive Ebola Return to Help Others

Erika Check Hayden reports from Sierra Leone on nurses who caught Ebola and survived, and are now back in clinics helping others fight the disease. Even though they are thankful to have escaped with their lives, the stigma and fear they face in their neighborhoods can be difficult. Show More Summary

The Huge, Unseen Operation Behind the Accuracy of Google Maps

The Google Maps team refines their maps and keeps them up to date with a combination of computer vision algorithms and meticulous manual labor The post The Huge, Unseen Operation Behind the Accuracy of Google Maps appeared first on WIRED.

Is That an Asteroid or a Comet? It’s Getting Harder to Tell

Traditionally, comets and asteroids belong to two distinct categories. Recent findings, however, are now revealing the distinction to be rather murky. The post Is That an Asteroid or a Comet? It’s Getting Harder to Tell appeared first on WIRED.

The Last Astronauts to Fly to Hubble Talk About Their Wild Mission

Together in public for the first time since their 2009 mission, the crew of the final Hubble servicing mission tells tales of their journey. The post The Last Astronauts to Fly to Hubble Talk About Their Wild Mission appeared first on WIRED.

This Week’s Most Bizarre Encounters With Wild Animals

A roomful of government biologists reconstructed the 2,800-mile trek of a grizzly bear named Ethyl. “She had some really bizarre travels,” one said. The post This Week’s Most Bizarre Encounters With Wild Animals appeared first on WI...

Absurd Creature of the Week: This Is an Actual Insect. This Is Not a Joke

Let’s just admit it: We all have body issues to some degree. I, for instance, was informed a few years back by a drunk lady in a bar that I am in fact slightly bow-legged, which was the first I’d heard of it. The revelation was enormous, and still remains a source of some anxiety […] The post Absurd Creature of the Week: This Is an Actual Insect. Show More Summary

Case for Chimpanzee Rights Rejected by Appeals Court

The plaintiff in a landmark lawsuit seeking legal rights for a chimpanzee remains, for the time being, a creature with none. A New York appeals court this morning rejected the lawsuit, filed by the Nonhuman Rights Project, on behalf of Tommy, a 26-year-old chimp kept alone in an upstate warehouse. Show More Summary

DNA Test That Distinguishes Identical Twins May Be Used in Court for First Time

A new genetic test that can distinguish between identical twins may be used for the first time in a Massachusetts sexual assault case. The post DNA Test That Distinguishes Identical Twins May Be Used in Court for First Time appeared first on WIRED.

Science Graphic of the Week: 10-Foot-Long Map Charts Path of America’s Next Total Solar Eclipse

August 21, 2017 will be the day of the great American eclipse, the first total solar eclipse visible in the continental US since 1979 and the first to cross both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts since 1918. A new map, which would be 10 feet long if printed out, is a guide to this remarkable event. Show More Summary

Growth Hormone Usage Rises Among Teens

Friday nights in the fall mean high school football. But that wholesome slice of Americana also contains a dark undercurrent–a marked rise in the use of human growth hormone by high school aged students. In a recent survey of 3,705 kids,...Show More Summary

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