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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6439
Posts / Week:19.1
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

American Ebola Patients Cleared and Released From Hospital

ATLANTA—Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol have recovered. The two American aid workers, who since early August had been receiving treatment for Ebola at Emory University Hospital, are being released—hospital officials in Atlanta cited multiple clean blood tests for both. Standing in front of a press conference this morning, Brantly simply said “I am thrilled to be […]

Science Graphic of the Week: Inside a Lizard’s Regenerating Tail

Researchers created visual and DNA analysis of how anoles regenerate their tails.

Cities Are Making Spiders Grow Bigger and Multiply Faster

A new study published today in PLOS One shows that golden orb weaver spiders living near heavily urbanized areas in Sydney, Australia tend to be bigger, better fed, and have more babies than those living in places less touched by human hands.

Fantastically Wrong: Why People Were Terrified of Nighttime Air Until the 1900s

If you’re a millennial like me, you remember the Nickelodeon show Are You Afraid of the Dark?, in which kids sit around a campfire (or flickering stage lights or whatever), taking turns giving each other anxiety disorders with scary stories. The title is a bit of a silly question, though. Everyone is to some degree […]

All You Can Eat

Adam Voorhes In January of this year, the first subject checked into the metabolic ward at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, to participate in one of the most rigorous dietary studies ever devised. For eight weeks, he was forbidden to leave. He spent two days of each week inside tiny airtight rooms […]

The Strange Blowpipe 19th Century Miners Used to Analyze Ore

Pretend for a minute that it’s 1875 and you’re a mining engineer whose job it is to figure out how much gold is in them thar hills. Get it wrong, and your company is going to waste a lot of time and money hunting for gold that’s not there—or worse yet, miss out on the mother […]

Searching for Causes of the Ebola Outbreak, and a Way to Stop the Next One

Every time Daniel Bausch, a virologist from Tulane University, went back to Guinea, things looked worse. The country’s few paved roads crumbled. The forests seemed thinner. Prices shot up on everything in the market. From 1998 to 2008, Bausch was working for the World Health Organization in West Africa, chasing a viral disease called Lassa. […]

How Scientists Upgraded Alvin Into a Superpowered Sub

Bryan Christie Design Deep-sea explorers and scientists have long relied on the Alvin submersible, based in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, to visit the abyssal depths. But after 50 years of diving everywhere from hydrothermal vents to the wreckage of the Titanic, it was ready for a makeover. Three years and $41 million later, Alvin is back […]

Some Types of Fables May Be Better at Teaching Kids Not to Lie

To teach children not to lie, extolling the virtues of honesty may be more effective than focusing on the punishing consequences of deception.

How Microscopic Ocean Life May Help Make It Rain

SAN FRANCISCO—Clouds can carry millions of pounds of water, but that doesn’t mean rain and snow just happen. Hundreds of thousands of water vapor molecules need to freeze together as ice before they are heavy enough to fall to the ground. But, the water molecules need a bit of dust or other microscopic matter to latch onto in order […]

Absurd Creature of the Week: Voracious Velvet Worm Ensnares Foes With Jets of Slime

One of the animal kingdom’s more non-exclusive semantic clubs is that of the worms. Are you “any of a number of creeping or burrowing invertebrate animals with long, slender, soft bodies and no limbs,” as the New Oxford American Dictionary defines you? Well come on in—we have a seat just for you. From the ferocious […]

Science Graphic of the Week: Map Shows Western U.S. May Suffer Huge Reductions in Snow

The western United States is undergoing a major shift in precipitation patterns. Large swaths of the West that have historically been dominated by snow in the winter months are starting to see a lot more rain instead. A new study that maps out the predominant form of precipitation shows that this trend could result in […]

Scientists Program Largest Swarm of Robots Ever

Alone, the simple little robot can’t do much, shuffling around on three vibrating tooth-pick legs. But working with 1,000 or more like-minded fellow bots, it becomes part of a swarm that can self-assemble into any two-dimensional shape. These are some of the first steps toward creating huge herds of tiny robots that form larger structures—including […]

What It Takes to Win the World’s Highest Computer Science Honor

[HTML1] One summer afternoon in 2001, while visiting relatives in India, Subhash Khot drifted into his default mode — quietly contemplating the limits of computation. For hours, no one could tell whether the third-year Princeton University graduate student was working or merely sinking deeper into the living-room couch. That night, he woke up, scribbled something […]

This Sponge-Like Polymer Could Fix Facial Deformities

SAN FRANCISCO—Millions of people suffer from facial deformities because an injury, surgery, or birth defect left a gap in their bone structure. These bone gaps are too wide for the body’s normal healing process to fix, and surgical solutions like grafts and putties usually fall short of restoring a person’s looks. But a new sponge-like polymer could provide a scaffold […]

Meet the First Woman to Win Math’s Most Prestigious Prize

[HTML1] As an 8-year-old, Maryam Mirzakhani used to tell herself stories about the exploits of a remarkable girl. Every night at bedtime, her heroine would become mayor, travel the world or fulfill some other grand destiny. Today, Mirzakhani — a 37-year-old mathematics professor at Stanford University — still writes elaborate stories in her mind. The […]

Computerized Noses May Someday Sniff Out Drug Money at Border Crossings

A chemical sensing company is working on a device that can detect the smell of money.

Fantastically Wrong: Ridiculous Mythical Critters Dreamed Up by 19th Century Lumberjacks

America has the most ridiculous mythical creatures the world has ever known. Hands down. Nowhere else has a mythology formed so beautifully in a perfect amalgam of too much whiskey, too little sleep, and perhaps some accidentally consumed magic mushrooms.

Whats Makes Mederma Scar Gel Work?

Lupine Hammack ALLANTOIN The headliner in this gel, which claims to “reduce the appearance” of scars, is allantoin, a nitrogen-rich waste molecule excreted in mammalian urine. It softens keratin, the fibrous protein that makes your birthday suit tough and waterproof. That smooths the skin and encourages dead skin cells to slough off. ALLIUM CEPA BULB […]

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