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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6463
Posts / Week:19.1
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

New Maps Show Where Birds Will Fly as Earth’s Climate Changes

Audubon shared their data about how climate change might affect bird habitat with Map Lab, and we used it to make maps.

Clever Trout Match Chimpanzees in a Cognitive Challenge

Certain forms of collaboration are supposed to be so sophisticated that only the smartest creatures---namely humans and perhaps a few close relatives---are capable of them. Yet this exclusive club has a new and unexpected member: a species of fish, a class of animals seldom associated with high-level intelligence.

The Most Absurd Creatures on Earth, From Satanic Geckos to Fairy Armadillos

Well, here we are. Absurd Creature of the Week made it one year without getting canceled. It seems like just yesterday when I awkwardly asked WIRED’s resident GIF expert to make one of a pearlfish swimming up a sea cucumber’s bum. Or when I wrote about tiny marsupials that have sex until the males go […]

New High-Res Satellite Sees Through Smoke to Image Fires

Mapping major fires from above makes a lot of sense, but it’s often complicated by smoke obscuring what is happening on the ground. However, satellites with special infrared sensors can essentially see through the smoke to the fire, and a new satellite launched last month can do this at the highest resolution yet. These images […]

Science Graphic of the Week: Mapping Mars’ Missing Ice

Scientists use gullies made from melted ice, and their associated alluvial fans, to estimate the amount of ice frozen in the Martian soil.

Cinematic Cuts Exploit How Your Brain Edits What You See

It's amazing that film editing works, because it's so disruptive to the visual information coming into the brain, says Jeffrey Zacks, a neuroscientist at Washington University in St. Louis. On the other hand, Zacks says, our brains do quite a bit of editing of their own---and we're every bit as oblivious to that as we are to the film editor's cuts.

New Fabric Circuit Boards Can Be Worn, Washed, Stretched and Shot

A team of engineers from Hong Kong Polytechnic University have created a fabric knitted with wiring that can be worn and even washed.

Fantastically Wrong: The Imaginary Radiation That Shocked Science and Ruined Its ‘Discoverer’

In the winter of 1903, just eight years after the monumental discovery of X-rays, a French scientist by the name of René Blondlot stumbled upon a brand new form of radiation. He called them N-rays, after his town of Nancy, perhaps because naming them R-rays after himself would have been both unwieldy and self-absorbed.

How Movies Trick Your Brain Into Empathizing With Characters

There’s a scene near the end of Black Swan, where Nina finally loses her grip on reality. And when people watch it, their brain activity bears some resemblance to a pattern that’s been observed in people with schizophrenia, said Talma...Show More Summary

WIRED Space Photo of the Day for September 2014

Follow Space Photo of the Day on Twitter The 2013 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery The 2012 WIRED Space Photo of the Day Gallery For caption information and links to high-resolution images, please use the full-screen version of this gallery. For more mind-blowing space photos, see the entire WIRED Space Photo of the […]

Absurd Creature of the Week: The 100-Foot Sea Critter That Deploys a Net of Death

These are the siphonophores, some 180 known species of gelatinous strings that can grow to 100 feet long, making them some of the longest critters on the planet. But instead of growing as a single body like virtually every other animal,...Show More Summary

Turns Out Wolves’ Yawns Are Contagious, Too

In the yawns of wolves, scientists have found a hint of emotional depths once thought restricted to humans and our closest ancestors. Contagious yawning — the tendency to involuntarily follow suit when seeing another person yawn — is...Show More Summary

Science Graphic of the Week: Where We Should and Shouldn’t Build Roads in the Future

Humans are going to pave over 15 million miles of new roads in the next 35 years. This map shows where those roads should and should not go.

How Movies Synchronize the Brains of an Audience

When people watch a movie together their brain activity is, to a remarkable degree, synchronized. It's a slightly creepy thought. It's also a testament to the captivating power of cinema, says Uri Hasson, a psychologist at Princeton University.

Scientists Turn Bad Memories Into Good Inside the Brains of Mice

Neuroscientists have devised a technique for switching the emotional association of a memory from bad to good by directly manipulating the neurons that encode it.

Fantastically Wrong: The Legend of the Homicidal Fire-Proof Salamander

In the first century AD, Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder threw a salamander into a fire. He wanted to see if it could indeed not only survive the flames, but extinguish them, as Aristotle had claimed such creatures could. But the salamander didn’t … uh … make it. [HTML1] Yet that didn’t stop the legend […]

What’s Inside: The Science of Sriracha’s Fiery Deliciousness

JARREN VINK CHILI Red jalapeños give rooster sauce its heat; they clock in at about 5,000 Scoville units, or around 300 parts per million of mouth-burning capsaicinoids. These molecules bind to a receptor, TRPV1, that shows up on the ends of nerves that lead to the trigeminal nerve, which conveys touch, temperature, and pain. GARLIC […]

What’s Up With That: Your Fingernails Grow Way Faster Than Your Toenails

I like to clip my nails, because I’m addicted to the rewarding little tink of the clippers. Instead of being content with a finely manicured set of man hands, I crave more tinks. Without fail, I’ll kick off my sneakers in hopes of clipping away my toe talons, but instead of tinks, all I make is a loud sigh, because my toenails […]

How Movies Manipulate Your Brain to Keep You Entertained

At a recent event hosted by the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences, neuroscientists and cognitive psychologists got together with film makers to discuss what both groups have learned---the scientists through painstaking experiments and analysis, and the film makers by intuition and experience---about the mechanisms of attention and perception.

Introducing Absurd Creature of the Week’s Tournament of Absurdity!

We’re coming up on one whole year of Absurd Creature of the Week! So to celebrate, we’ve used a super-secret, super-complex algorithm to choose the most absurd of the absurd—to pit them against each other in mortal combat. For the next week and a half, we’ll present you with matchups. The first round is split […]

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