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Blog Profile / Wired Science


URL :http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:6511
Posts / Week:19
Archived Since:April 5, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Fantastically Wrong: Europe’s Insane History of Putting Animals on Trial and Executing Them

This is Europe’s shameful and largely forgotten history of putting animal "criminals" on trial and either executing them or, for plagues of insects, ordering them to leave town not only by a certain day, but by an exact time. Such irrational...Show More Summary

How We Can Harvest Wind Power From Tiny Flapping Flags

Researchers have created a small flag generator that harvests electricity by flapping in the breeze. The post How We Can Harvest Wind Power From Tiny Flapping Flags appeared first on WIRED.

‘Big Bang Signal’ Could All Be Dust

There was little need, before, to know exactly how much dust peppers outer space, far from the plane of the Milky Way. Scientists understood that the dimly radiating grains aligned with our galaxy’s magnetic field and that the field’s twists and turns gave a subtle swirl to the dust glow. Show More Summary

What’s Up With That? Phantom Cellphone Vibrations

Phantom cellphone vibrations are surprisingly common. What causes this strange phenomenon? The post What’s Up With That? Phantom Cellphone Vibrations appeared first on WIRED.

How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature

The Western Ghats in India rise like a wall between the Arabian Sea and the heart of the subcontinent to the east. The 1,000-mile-long chain of coastal mountains is dense with lush rainforest and grasslands, and each year, clouds bearing...Show More Summary

Close-Up Aerial Photos of Africa’s Last Elephants

Kate Brooks' aerial photos show the beauty of Africa's elephants, and the catastrophic extinction they face at the hands of poachers. The post Close-Up Aerial Photos of Africa’s Last Elephants appeared first on WIRED.

Forget GMOs. Better Data Is the Key to Reinventing Food

The tiny startup already has created a reasonable facsimile of chicken eggs---an imitation that's significantly cheaper, safer, and possibly healthier than the real thing. Now it's working to overhaul other foods in much the same way. The post Forget GMOs. Better Data Is the Key to Reinventing Food appeared first on WIRED.

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Parasitic Worm That Turns Snails Into Disco Zombies

This is Leucochloridium, a parasitic worm that invades a snail's eyestalks, where it pulsates to imitate a caterpillar. The worm then mind-controls its host out into the open for hungry birds to pluck its eyes out. In the bird’s guts...Show More Summary

Science Graphic of the Week: An Algorithm That Decodes The Surface of the Earth

A study published last week in the Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing describes an algorithm that can classify land cover types with minimal nudging from humans. The post Science Graphic of the Week: An Algorithm That Decodes The Surface of the Earth appeared first on WIRED.

Boom! Earth’s Population Could Hit 12 Billion by 2100

Earth is fast becoming a more crowded place — and it may become more crowded than expected. According to a new projection of human population growth, there could very well be 12.3 billion people by century's end, up to two billion more than some estimates. The post Boom! Earth’s Population Could Hit 12 Billion by 2100 appeared first on WIRED.

The Great Fracking Forward: Why the World Needs China to Frack Even More

China's coal addiction threatens the planet. But can it handle a natural gas revolution? The post The Great Fracking Forward: Why the World Needs China to Frack Even More appeared first on WIRED.

This Mortician Thinks You Should Spend More Time With Corpses

Caitlin Doughty has been cutting pacemakers out of corpses, grinding human bones by hand, and loading bodies into cremation chambers for seven years. But the 30-year-old mortician doesn't want to keep all the fun to herself: She thinks the rest of us should get to have a little more face time with the deceased. Show More Summary

Fantastically Wrong: Magellan’s Strange Encounter With the 10-Foot Giants of Patagonia

In 1520, Ferdinand Magellan took time out of his busy schedule of sailing around the world to stop in what is now Patagonia, where he found a naked giant dancing and singing on the shore. Magellan ordered one of his men to make contact...Show More Summary

This Bizarre Organism Builds Itself a New Genome Every Time It Has Sex

Oxytricha trifallax lives in ponds all over the world. Under an electron microscope it looks like a football adorned with tassels. The tiny fringes are the cilia it uses to move around and gobble up algae. What makes Oxytricha unusual, however, is the crazy things it does with its DNA. Show More Summary

NASA Taps Boeing, SpaceX to Transport Astronauts to Space Station

In the latest step toward commercial human space flight, Boeing and SpaceX have been chosen to carry the next NASA astronauts into space, the agency announced today. NASA awarded $4.2 billion to Boeing and $2.6 billion to SpaceX to send...Show More Summary

A Stretchable, Light-Up Surface Inspired By Squid Skin

Squid and other cephalopods control their skin displays by contracting color-filled cells. A team of engineers attempted the same using elastomer and electrical pulses. The post A Stretchable, Light-Up Surface Inspired By Squid Skin appeared first on WIRED.

What’s Up With That: Why Do All My Friends Like the Same Music?

Music has chemistry, both in maintaining friendships and helping us make new ones. Science can help us understand how it works. The post What’s Up With That: Why Do All My Friends Like the Same Music? appeared first on WIRED.

This Ant-Sized Radio Is Powered by the Messages It Receives

A joint team of engineers from UC Berkeley and Stanford University have printed an ant-sized radio onto a silicon chip that harvests energy from the signals it receives. The post This Ant-Sized Radio Is Powered by the Messages It Receives appeared first on WIRED.

Uncovering Hidden Text on a 500-Year-Old Map That Guided Columbus

A team of researchers is using a technique called multispectral imaging to uncover the hidden text on a 500-year old map used by Christopher Columbus to plan his first voyage across the Atlantic. The post Uncovering Hidden Text on a 500-Year-Old Map That Guided Columbus appeared first on WIRED.

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Naked Mole Rat Could One Day Save Your Life

“Sic semper tyrannis,” Brutus supposedly yelled as he helped assassinate Julius Caesar: Thus always to tyrants. John Wilkes Booth exclaimed the same to the panicked crowd in Ford’s Theater after he shot Lincoln. And in dark underground...Show More Summary

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