Blog Profile / Columbia Journalism Review


URL :http://www.cjr.org/
Filed Under:Media / Media Industry News
Posts on Regator:6363
Posts / Week:15.2
Archived Since:April 26, 2008

Blog Post Archive

What’s driving Israel’s media crackdown?

In the past few months, a veteran Israeli radio presenter lost half his airtime because he asked a top security official a tough question. Members of the foreign press were called before parliament twice to answer charges of “bias.”Show More Summary

Anonymous sourcing and the problem with NBA trade ‘scoops’

There is, perhaps, no more fertile ground for scoops than sports journalism in the days leading up to a trade deadline such as the NBA’s, which arrived today at 3pm Eastern. For the past week, the news outlets and Twitter feeds that cover the NBA have buzzed with stories about what would or would not happen by the deadline. The...

Could the Chicago ownership shuffle mean a brighter future for the Sun-Times?

The Chicago Sun-Times had a message for Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner last week: “It ain’t workin’,” the paper’s editorial board declared in a blistering editorial that accused the Republican governor of “inflicting permanent damage” on the city and blamed him for making a political mess of the state since taking office a year ago. Two days later, the paper again...

60 Minutes does John Brennan's job for him

Fear is flammable, and on this week’s episode of 60 Minutes, host Scott Pelley seemed determined to kindle it. Pelley interviewed CIA Director John Brennan at CIA headquarters last Sunday about the security threats facing the United States in 2016, and the threat of ISIS in particular. Pelley opens the show with the claim that ISIS has, “the manpower, the...

What's it like to have Tina Fey play you in a movie? Ask Kim Barker

Who would play you in a movie? It’s the kind of question that might come up among reporters aiming above their station (or laughingly taking each other down). But for former war correspondent Kim Barker, the answer may have been suggested by a glowing New York Times review of her book about covering the war in Afghanistan, in which the...

How covering the Flint water crisis has changed Michigan Radio

Steve Carmody sometimes feels uneasy about the praise. Carmody is a Flint-based reporter for Michigan Radio, the state’s leading public radio service, which was among the earliest news outlets to report seriously on concerns that the city’s residents were being poisoned by lead leaching from their water pipes—the result of a switch to a new water source in April 2014....

The muscularity of Hillary Clinton

A reporter for The Atlantic got in trouble recently for agreeing, in 2009, to receive an advance copy of a Hillary Clinton speech in return for calling it “muscular.” A reporter for The New York Times also used the word “muscular” for the same speech, but told the public editor that there was no deal. “My use of the word...

Podcasts and community

Clayton is the host of BuzzFeed’s Another Round podcast, during which she and co-host Heben Nigatu laugh and drink their way through an hour of camaraderie, interviews, and commentary, touching on a range of topics loosely centered around race, gender, and pop culture. Show More Summary

Political journalists reacted with smart, thoughtful coverage following Antonin Scalia’s death

Antonin Scalia’s passing over the weekend was just the second death of a sitting Supreme Court justice since 1954. What’s more, it comes during a presidential election year, a fact that is invigorating judicial activists and propelling both Republicans and Democrats into a breakneck feud over who should get to nominate Scalia’s replacement. Show More Summary

Donald Trump’s media domination and what it could mean for future candidates

In some ways, it's surprising Donald Trump took so long to call one of his political opponents a pussy. He was repeating the words of a supporter, to be fair. But in a campaign whose success in attracting media attention relies on shock and awe, it was a logical step forward. Familiar players took familiar battle stations after Trump’s profane...

What the media really should focus on with the release of Hillary Clinton's emails

A federal judge—fed up with constant State Department delays—ordered another batch of Hillary Clinton last week, which meant we yet again got to find out how many of the dozens of new emails were held back because they’re classified. Or should I say “classified.” Given that it is the Central Intelligence Agency that has been, once again, handed the power to determine what...

With Turkey, the shame game isn't enough

Rohat Akta?, a reporter for a regional Kurdish newspaper, was shot in the arm last month and has been pinned down in Cizre for weeks, unable to get medical help. Another reporter, Refik Tekin, was shot in the leg while filming the gruesome massacre of civilians evacuating the dead and wounded. The incident prompted U.N. High Commissioner for Human...

Here’s what happened when a local reporter's coverage was turned into a play

Mike McGraw has witnessed a lot in 40 years of reporting. One thing he never expected to see: a stage production based on his work. But that’s exactly what’s happening this month in downtown Kansas City, Missouri, where a local theater group is staging a one-act play based on McGraw’s years-long investigation into a 1988 explosion that killed six firefighters....

Could collaborating with scientists be the next step for investigative reporting?

For decades, investigative reporters have approached stories with a similar mindset: Find the bad guys. We collect examples of wrongdoing, we put the examples in a pile, and if the pile becomes big enough, we have a story. If the story is compelling enough, maybe someone will call for change. This approach works well, and I have used it frequently...

When it comes to drug busts, journalists often don’t ask the right questions

It’s a proud day for, well, whichever town this happens to be. Stone-faced cops take the podium to announce their big drug bust, toting a few kilos of heroin or cocaine and a pyramid of mugshots. Officers describe the investigation, pledge their commitment to safe streets, and warn any drug dealers out there to watch their backs. Reporters, meanwhile, return...

Jon Caramanica's lexicon of sound

Jon Caramanica has an ear for physicality. The New York Times pop music critic is known for his inventiveness when describing the texture of vocals and instrumentals in many genres, and that’s best exhibited when he reviews hip-hop and R&B. To give a sense of that sensibility, below are 77 descriptors that Caramanica has used since the start of last year....

Why student journalists at University of Kansas filed a federal lawsuit

Here’s an unfortunate fact of life: On college campuses, it’s not uncommon for the people who control university funds to be accused of using that power to punish or coerce their journalistic critics in some way. At the Student Press Law Center, a leading advocacy organization, “that's a call we probably take a dozen times a year,” says Frank LoMonte,...

How local media coverage is forcing Cleveland to try to finally fix its lead problem

Rachel Dissell lives in one of Cleveland’s “high risk” neighborhoods for lead exposure, a place where the state mandates screenings for small children. Still, when a blood test in late 2012 revealed that her young son had elevated levels in the aftermath of a home renovation, Dissell, a reporter for The Plain Dealer, was horrified--she hadn’t fully realized the scope...

Amid populist upheaval, A.O. Scott reviews criticism

A.O. Scott’s new book asserts that criticism is a “fundamentally democratic undertaking.” That’s a surprisingly populist sentiment coming from one of the two chief film critics at The New York Times. Criticism is surely no longer an oligarchy, where writers can claim a monopoly on taste, nor a dictatorship, where they can control hits and flops. But in the eyes...

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