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Blog Profile / Free Exchange


URL :http://www.economist.com/blogs/freeexchange/
Filed Under:Business & Finance / Economics
Posts on Regator:5607
Posts / Week:17.1
Archived Since:June 7, 2008

Blog Post Archive

How a minnow became a giant

This week: The latest economic news from China, Banco Santander's future after the death of its executive chairman, and a new study on bankers' pay

Hiding in plain sight

THE ECONOMIST attended a lecture by Andy Haldane, the chief economist of the Bank of England. Mr Haldane is known for his work on financial regulation but this lecture was about something quite different: volunteering. The lecture had a simple message. Show More Summary

Big problems for little countries

IN THE last five years growth in the rich world has been measly. From 1990 to 2007 high-income countries managed an inflation-adjusted per-capita GDP growth of about 2.3% per year. From 2008 to 2013, though, the total growth was only 2%. Show More Summary

A plea for more data

IN AMERICA, one in three workers does some work on the weekend. Europeans are more likely to treat Saturday and Sunday as sacred: only one in five workers in France, Germany and the Netherlands buck the trend. American workers are rather nocturnal, too. Show More Summary

Fizz in the bond markets

This week: The US economy and employment figures, corporate borrowing and what to expect from the Alibaba IPO

ECB, heal thyself

Europe does not yet have its equivalent of Japan's Abenomics, but Mario Draghi, president of the European Central Bank, pretty much advocated as much in his press conference last week. Europe, he said, needs fiscal, monetary and structural policy working together, the three arrows of Abenomics. Show More Summary

Counting catastrophe's costs

THIS month marks the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. It also marks the sixth anniversary of the collapse of Lehman Brothers. Both types of disaster can wreak havoc on an economy. But which is worse, a cyclone or a banking crisis?...Show More Summary

Busy, busy

THE European Central Bank responded today to a flatlining economy and a fall in inflation to just 0.3% with two new measures. First, its governing council lowered the bank’s main lending rate from 0.15% to a new low of 0.05%. It also...Show More Summary

A productive decade

Central banks rarely let economies run at full speed

Potentially interesting

The debate over just how much spare capacity remains in the American economy continues

From ink to clink

WE RECENTLY wrote about how a tattoo affects your job prospects. A paper from Kaitlyn Harger, a PhD student at West Virginia University, takes it a step further. Ms Harger found data from Florida and looked at what happened to people when they left prison. Show More Summary

A new growth crisis

THIS week: Central bank meetings and the performance of real wages

The dollar's sterling work

A FORTHCOMING paper in the Journal of Development Economics looks at the dollar’s ascendancy to global reserve currency. Barry Eichengreen, of the University of California, Berkeley, and two economists from the ECB up-end the conventional history of when the dollar became top dog. Show More Summary

Learn, and be less unequal

IN THIS week’s Free exchange column, we look at why globalisation may not reduce inequality in developing countries. Lots of theories have been proposed. We discuss one, outlined by Eric Maskin of Harvard University. Mr Maskin has been working for over a decade on this theory, which he is developing alongside Michael Kremer, a Harvard colleague. Show More Summary

A less dovish Yellen, a more dovish Draghi

The contradictory signals generated by American labour market data in the last year have provided grist for both hawks and doves at the Federal Reserve. For hawks, the rapid decline in the unemployment rate shows slack in the economy is disappearing so the Fed should tighten soon. Show More Summary

New numbers, same conclusion

THE ECONOMIST recently published an article about the costs and benefits of various kinds of zero- and low-carbon energy, “Sun, wind and drain”. The article was based on research by Charles Frank of the Brookings Institution (whose paper is here). Show More Summary

Kidneys and housing bubbles

WE ARE covering the 5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences, held in a small, pretty Bavarian town. It is a unique event, with about half the living Nobel laureates in attendance. Each gives a talk about their research and then leads a small class to a select group of young economists. Show More Summary

Economics for the masses

Once thought of as a staid profession, economists are increasingly repackaging themselves for public consumption. The rise of data journalism has helped catapult practitioners of the dismal science into the public domain. However, the gap between economists’ thinking and public opinion is often large. Show More Summary

Fad or fact?

Has something more fundamental gone wrong than the usual down-phase of the business-cycle?

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