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Blog Profile / Dani Rodrik's Weblog


URL :http://rodrik.typepad.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Political Science
Posts on Regator:279
Posts / Week:0.8
Archived Since:July 25, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Services, manufacturing, and new growth strategies

I gave a talk yesterday on New Growth Strategies at the World Bank, which was more or less an elaboration of this short piece. I argued that industrialization had pretty much run out of steam as a growth strategy, that...

Back to sanity on economic convergence

It’s been interesting to watch how the conventional wisdom on rapid convergence – developing countries closing the gap with the advanced economies – has been changing over the last few years. It wasn’t so long ago that the world was...

My moonlighting career of the last 4 years

At long last, Turkey's consitutional court has reversed the conviction of the more than 200 officers previously found guilty in the bogus Sledgehammer coup plot, leading to the release on June 19th of all those in jail (including my father...

Joining Global Policy as general editor

David Held is one of the most thoughtful researchers and commentators on global issues, so I am thrilled and honored to be joining forces with him as joint general editor of Global Policy. The journal publishes a range of exciting.....

Erdogan’s Coup

Daron Acemoglu wrote what seemed like a surprising upbeat piece on Turkish democracy a few days ago. His argument seems to be that democracy required power to be wrested away from the secularists who had erected authoritarian structures, and Erdogan...

Today’s structural transformation is a more mixed story than in the past

Guest post by Uma Lele[1] How quickly and how well are developing countries transforming their economies and with what effects on inter-sectorial growth and distribution? A group of us studied structural transformation looking at evidence from 109 countries over 30...

Globalization and premature deindustrialization

Arvind Subramanian has a nice post, which provides additional evidence on the phenomenon of premature industrialization that I have talked about and documented previously. Arvind works with data on industry rather than manufacturing per se, which I prefer. But the...

Higher food prices are good for the poor ... in the long run

Guest post by Derek Headey A few years ago Dani very kindly let me guestblog on some of my work on the global food crisis (see here and also Dani’s much earlier comments here). In that earlier work I used...

If the rest of the world really want to help Turkey

Here is the one paragraph version of what is happening in Turkey. During the last decade in which he has been in power, Erdogan has allowed the Gulen movement to take control over the police, judiciary, and large parts of...

Economics as craft

I have an article in the IAS’s quarterly publication, the Institute Letter, on the state of Economics. Despite the evident role of the economics profession in the recent crisis and my critical views on conventional wisdom in globalization and development,...

On premature deindustrialization

Traditional economies grow and develop first by industrializing, and then by moving into services. This has been the classic path to economic and political modernity. A few non-Western countries have been able to replicate this path: Japan, Taiwan, and South...

Goodbye Harvard, hello Institute for Advanced Study

So big changes ahead for me. This is my last week at Harvard, as I am moving to the Institute for Advanced Study as the Albert O. Hirschman professor in the School of Social Science. Here is the Institute’s official...

Prospects for future economic growth

Tyler Cowen refers to some of my work in his NYT piece on dimming prospects for high growth in emerging market economies. Coincidentally, the brand new Global Citizen Foundation has just published my more substantial paper on this topic, titled...

How well did the Turkish economy do over the last decade?

There has been much discussion in Turkey in recent days about the performance of the economy under the AKP government, occasioned in part by an exchange I had with Minister of Finance Mehmet ?im?ek. The Turkish government likes to claim...

Turkey’s Protests Send a Strong Message, But Will Not Bring Democracy

What follows below is the original, unedited version of my oped in the Financial Times today, for those who cannot access it. __ The protests that engulfed Turkey in recent days caught by surprise even those observers who, like me,....

What is wrong (and right) in economics?

The World Economics Association recently interviewed me on the state of economics, inquiring about my views on pluralism in the profession. You can find the result on the WEA's newsletter here (the interview starts on page 9). I reproduce it...

Experts, knowledge and advocacy

This is so absolutely brilliant and important: “One thing that experts know, and that non-experts do not, is that they know less than non-experts think they do.” It comes from Kaushik Basu, currently chief economist at the World Bank and...

What the BRICS could do

My newest Project Syndicate column is on the BRICS. These countries – Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa – have little in common. Most prognostications suggested they would agree on very little. Yet they have surprised the world by...

The IMF a convert to Growth Diagnostics?

It’s surprising how the language of growth diagnostics and binding constraints springs up in all kinds of unexpected places. The latest example is the IMF’s new report on jobs and growth. The IMF’s analysts say all the usual things about...

On ideas, interests, and political economy

This column on “The Tyranny of Political Economy” quickly rose to become the most-read piece on Project Syndicate – quite to my surprise, as it deals essentially with an academic subject. I take the recent rational-choice political economy to task...

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