Blog Profile / Dani Rodrik's Weblog


URL :http://rodrik.typepad.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Political Science
Posts on Regator:210
Posts / Week:0.5
Archived Since:July 25, 2008

Blog Post Archive

I'm profiled...

by the IMF, in their magazine Finance & Development. Here is the link. The piece is written by the IMF's Prakash Loungani, who has gone back and fished out vignettes that even I had forgotten. Here is the opening: The...

More on the political trilemma of the global economy

Martin Sandbu of the Financial Times has a very thoughtful discussion of my globalization trilemma, as it applies to Brexit among other things. Sandbu argues that “thinking critically about Rodrik’s trilemma should lead us to more optimistic conclusions.” I largely...

"Economics Rules" included in FT's list of Best Economics Books of 2015

Martin Wolf's take on the book is characteristically to the point, and the best short summary I have seen as yet: After the financial crisis, economics is in the doghouse. Rodrik, one of the world’s most perceptive policy analysts, wants...

An update on Economics Rules

My Economics Rules: The Rights and Wrongs of the Dismal Science has been out now for more than a month, and I am quite pleased by the early reactions. Here is the review in The New York Times Book Review...

The Chronicle of Higher Education Does Sledgehammer

I have written here frequently about the sham trials that Turkey’s strongman Recep Tayyip Erdogan used – along with his then allies, the Gülen movement – to topple the secularist establishment and solidify his hold on power. Among those targeted...

Trade within versus between nations

I am doing one of the “Conversations with Tyler” events on September 24th, and in preparation for that, Tyler Cowen asked his blog readers to submit possible questions. As of this writing, there was a terrific list of challenging questions...

The War of Trade Models

There is an interesting debate going on in Europe about the likely consequences of the TTIP (Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership). Much of the real debate is (or should be) about the proposed Investor-State dispute resolution (ISDS) and the desirability...

Turkish economic myths

Preparing for a panel discussion on Turkey gave me the opportunity of putting together some notes and slides on the country’s economy. That Turkey is not doing well at the moment, economically or politically, is well known. But the roots...

Premature deindustrialization in the developing world

Mention “deindustrialization,” and the image that comes to mind is that of advanced economies making their way into the post-industrial phase of development. In a new paper,[1] I show that the more dramatic trend is one of deindustrialization in the...

Grek elections, democracy, political trilemma, and all that

Two-and-a-half years ago I wrote a short piece titled "The End of the World as We Know It" which began like this: Consider the following scenario. After a victory by the left-wing Syriza party, Greece’s new government announces that it...

Levels of intellectual responsibility

This piece on “Erdogan’s Willing Enablers” prompts me to put down a few thoughts on the role that various members of the Turkish media and intelligentsia have played in enabling the steady deterioration of the political climate in Turkey over...

Services, manufacturing, and new growth strategies

I gave a talk yesterday on New Growth Strategies at the World Bank, which was more or less an elaboration of this short piece. I argued that industrialization had pretty much run out of steam as a growth strategy, that...

Back to sanity on economic convergence

It’s been interesting to watch how the conventional wisdom on rapid convergence – developing countries closing the gap with the advanced economies – has been changing over the last few years. It wasn’t so long ago that the world was...

My moonlighting career of the last 4 years

At long last, Turkey's consitutional court has reversed the conviction of the more than 200 officers previously found guilty in the bogus Sledgehammer coup plot, leading to the release on June 19th of all those in jail (including my father...

Joining Global Policy as general editor

David Held is one of the most thoughtful researchers and commentators on global issues, so I am thrilled and honored to be joining forces with him as joint general editor of Global Policy. The journal publishes a range of exciting.....

Erdogan’s Coup

Daron Acemoglu wrote what seemed like a surprising upbeat piece on Turkish democracy a few days ago. His argument seems to be that democracy required power to be wrested away from the secularists who had erected authoritarian structures, and Erdogan...

Today’s structural transformation is a more mixed story than in the past

Guest post by Uma Lele[1] How quickly and how well are developing countries transforming their economies and with what effects on inter-sectorial growth and distribution? A group of us studied structural transformation looking at evidence from 109 countries over 30...

Globalization and premature deindustrialization

Arvind Subramanian has a nice post, which provides additional evidence on the phenomenon of premature industrialization that I have talked about and documented previously. Arvind works with data on industry rather than manufacturing per se, which I prefer. But the...

Higher food prices are good for the poor ... in the long run

Guest post by Derek Headey A few years ago Dani very kindly let me guestblog on some of my work on the global food crisis (see here and also Dani’s much earlier comments here). In that earlier work I used...

If the rest of the world really want to help Turkey

Here is the one paragraph version of what is happening in Turkey. During the last decade in which he has been in power, Erdogan has allowed the Gulen movement to take control over the police, judiciary, and large parts of...

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