Blog Profile / Chris Blattman's Blog


URL :http://chrisblattman.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Political Science
Posts on Regator:1715
Posts / Week:4.8
Archived Since:July 25, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Links I liked

Steven Lubet questions whether Alice Goffman’s On the Run is all true, and Alex Tabarrok’s impression that Lubet’s making mountains out of molehills. I lean to Alex’s impression and if I ever have the time will blog about Goffman’s book. It’s an important book. Did you … Continue reading ? The post Links I liked appeared first on Chris Blattman.

How do people defend eating meat?

This study asked students and adults in the United States why they find it OK to eat meat.  The largest category used to justify their choice was that that it is “necessary” followed by the other three categories. Typical comments … Continue reading ? The post How do people defend eating meat? appeared first on Chris Blattman.

How to break the Internet: cute animals plus Star Wars

The Ottawa Humane Society wanted to do something different than the usual cute adoption pictures. More here. Hat tip to Whitney Shinkle.   The post How to break the Internet: cute animals plus Star Wars appeared first on Chris Blatt...

The geek heretic

My first job abroad was helping to roll out rural Internet in India, by radio. It was 2001, the peak of the dot com boom, but before the ubiquity of mobile phones. Connecting remote villages in India to the Internet … Continue reading ? The post The geek heretic appeared first on Chris Blattman.

I have an idea for another get-out-the-vote experiment

An Arizona woman was sentenced to three-and-a-half years in prison for running over her husband because he failed to to cast a vote about who would spend the next four years in the White House. Holly Nicole Solomon, 31, hit … Continue reading ? The post I have an idea for another get-out-the-vote experiment appeared first on Chris Blattman.

If you want people to believe your research, write it in Baskerville font?

We have entered a new, unexpected landscape. Truth is not typeface dependent, but a typeface can subtly influence us to believe that a sentence is true. Could it swing an election? Induce us to buy a new dinette set? Change … Continue reading ? The post If you want people to believe your research, write it in Baskerville font? appeared first on Chris Blattman.

What should social science learn from the faked Science study on gay marriage?

Not much. If you haven’t heard about the article, the apparent fraud, and the aftermath, follow the links. The duped coauthor, Don Green, speaks to New York Magazine here. It’s a great interview. My view: Asking what social science should...Show More Summary

IPA’s weekly links

Guest post by Jeff Mosenkis of Innovations for Poverty Action. The NYTimes’ Nick Kristof writes about the new and very real findings in Science about helping the ultra-poor, in “The Power of Hope” today. On the Development Impact blog, there’s … Continue reading ? The post IPA’s weekly links appeared first on Chris Blattman.

These weak states of America (aid and corruption edition)

A special treat for my sky-is-falling-from-corruption nemeses. An excerpt from an ODI briefing paper on risks involved in using cash in humanitarian emergencies: The largest documented case of fraud in a humanitarian program providing money is from the United States. Show More Summary

Help me stop being an Africanist? (Colombia bleg)

I’m ready for a change of scenery, so I plan to spend several weeks in Colombia this summer looking for new research ideas and opportunities. I always thought of myself as a political economist who happened to work in Africa … Continue reading ? The post Help me stop being an Africanist? (Colombia bleg) appeared first on Chris Blattman.

These weak states of America (Waco edition)

A new series, to remind us that the developed world is not as distant from the rest as we’d like to think. From yesterday’s New York Times: The gunfire erupted about 12:15 p.m. outside a Twin Peaks Restaurant, where members of … Continue reading ? The post These weak states of America (Waco edition) appeared first on Chris Blattman.

The new Peace & Recovery program at Innovations for Poverty Action

The mission is “Evidence for Stability and Development” and I will be the new academic lead. In the coming decades, most of the poor will live in fragile states, yet, in spite of the studies already conducted, the rigorous evidence … Continue reading ? The post The new Peace & Recovery program at Innovations for Poverty Action appeared first on Chris Blattman.

When the long term data tell you hope is lost, wait for the long long run data

Everyone thought the Perry preschool program was a loss, until they saw the long run data on the children as adults. Now one of the other great American social experiments is showing a surprising turnaround: The Moving to Opportunity...Show More Summary

Heart of darkness, Manhattan edition

Wednesday Martin treks into darkest Manhattan, the Upper East Side, to dwell amongst the Glam SAHM tribe (for glamorous stay-at-home-moms). Sex segregation, I was told, was a “choice.” But like “choosing” not to work, or a Dogon woman in Mali’s … Continue reading ? The post Heart of darkness, Manhattan edition appeared first on Chris Blattman.

IPA’s weekly links

Note this is a guest post by Jeff Mosenkis of Innovations for Poverty Action. A new IPA/J-PAL six-country randomized controlled trial looking at the ultra-poor (people living on less than what $1.25 would buy in the US, about 1 in … Continue reading ? The post IPA’s weekly links appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Links I liked

Unreal interview with Seymour Hersh Jason Furman on the evidence for social safety welfare programs in the US Machine learning methods for estimating heterogeneous causal effects Great review of the crime and economics literature by Draca and Machin (though I selfishly … Continue reading ? The post Links I liked appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Will modern agriculture will turn more of America back to nature?

Agriculture has always been the greatest destroyer of nature, stripping and despoiling it, and reducing acreage left. Then, in about 1940, acreage and yield decoupled in the United States. Since then American farmers have quintupledShow More Summary

America’s 21st century elite is covert

Shamus Khan, a sociologist colleague here at Columbia, returned to his elite secondary school as a teacher cum ethnographer. I have finally gotten around to reading his book, Privilege, which is superb. The main reason to read the book, other … Continue reading ? The post America’s 21st century elite is covert appeared first on Chris Blattman.

“Please Like Me”

You have probably not heard of this show. An Australian comedy about sad things, including mental illness. It stars an aimless, kind of sad, bitterly witty young gay man. Maybe one of my favorite TV shows of the last couple … Continue reading ? The post “Please Like Me” appeared first on Chris Blattman.

IPA’s weekly links

This is guest post by Jeff Mosenkis of Innovations for Poverty Action. The New York Times Dealbook has a review of the new book, Misbehaving, by Richard Thaler, discussing how behavioral economics developed in contrast to the “rational choice” perspective of … Continue reading ? The post IPA’s weekly links appeared first on Chris Blattman.

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