Blog Profile / Chris Blattman's Blog


URL :http://chrisblattman.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Political Science
Posts on Regator:2069
Posts / Week:5
Archived Since:July 25, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Mathematicians mapped the social network of Game of Thrones to find the main character

And who says we won’t have enough things to do after the robots make everything? Full story The post Mathematicians mapped the social network of Game of Thrones to find the main character appeared first on Chris Blattman.

IPA’s weekly links

Guest post by Jeff Mosenkis of Innovations for Poverty Action. Bloomberg Businessweek’s How to Hack an Election profiles Andrés Sepúlveda, who has been manipulating elections in Latin America for a decade. IPA is funding research into financial services for the poor … Continue reading ? The post IPA’s weekly links appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Harvard’s general examination in the Department of Economics, in 1953

Question 5 is as follows: “Future historians may well write the epitaph of our civilization as follows: From freedom and science came rapid growth and change. From rapid growth and change came economic instability. From instability came...Show More Summary

Thrilled to announce I’ll be joining the Trump campaign to advise on development and humanitarian assistance…

…Is the most common April Fools joke I am seeing in my Facebook and Twitter feed. We really did all wake up with the same idea this morning. The thing is, somebody really does need to start advising him. The … Continue reading ? TheShow More Summary

These are the greatest teaching evaluation comments, ever

A professor friend on Facebook writes: My teaching evals are in; for your enjoyment, I have picked out the top 5 nuggets: (5) I would be lying to you if I said I ever thought about Africa outside of class … Continue reading ? The post These are the greatest teaching evaluation comments, ever appeared first on Chris Blattman.

An open letter to Senator Chuck Grassley from an Iowan high school student

The argument many Republicans are making is that Barack Obama is a “lame duck” president, and, because “the people have not spoken,” he should not be allowed to nominate a replacement for Justice Antonin Scalia. However, you are running...Show More Summary

Everything I need to know about democratization I can learn from Wikipedia

In February 2002, just one year after its launch, Wikipedia was rising quickly, but it was still officially an experimental project of the for-profit company Bomis.com. When then-CEO Jimmy Wales mused on the Wikipedia email list whether...Show More Summary

This blogger might be the only thing that makes sense of this election season (and help you keep your sanity)

Move over Nate Silver, some of the election season’s most accurate election forecasts are coming from blogger and pundit, Carl Diggler, the fake persona created by two comedians who forecast primary winners based on their the worst caricatures...Show More Summary

IPA’s weekly links

Guest post by Jeff Mosenkis of Innovations for Poverty Action. Evans, Goldstein, Jakiela, O’Sullivan, Montalvão, & Ozier, once again do an amazing job boiling down 120+ papers from Oxford’s Center for the Study of African Economies into one-sentence summaries, broken … Continue reading ? The post IPA’s weekly links appeared first on Chris Blattman.

How many decimals of pi do we actually need?

How many decimals does NASA use to make it’s calculations? This was a question posed to NASA engineers. The full answer is amazing. We can bring this down to home with our planet Earth. It is 7,926 miles in diameter … Continue reading ? The post How many decimals of pi do we actually need? appeared first on Chris Blattman.

One of the world’s largest cities in 1500 I’d never heard of

Situated on a plain, Benin City was enclosed by massive walls in the south and deep ditches in the north. Beyond the city walls, numerous further walls were erected that separated the surroundings of the capital into around 500 distinct … Continue reading ? The post One of the world’s largest cities in 1500 I’d never heard of appeared first on Chris Blattman.

What to do when your pre-tenure review leaves you on shaky ground

I had my third-year review in the spring of 2013, and it was rough. I wasn’t publishing enough and my future at the University of Texas at Austin was uncertain. As my very nice, very supportive chair sat across from … Continue reading ? The post What to do when your pre-tenure review leaves you on shaky ground appeared first on Chris Blattman.

The war on drugs explained by a Nixon adviser

Americans have been criminalizing psychoactive substances since San Francisco’s anti-opium law of 1875, but it was Ehrlichman’s boss, Richard Nixon, who declared the first “war on drugs” and set the country on the wildly punitive and counterproductive path it still … Continue reading ? The post The war on drugs explained by a Nixon adviser appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Please stop using “novel” and “unique” in your abstract

I love this. Three researchers picked 20 top biomedical journals and searched all titles and abstracts since 1975 for positive, negative, neutral, and random words. The absolute frequency of positive words increased from 2.0% (1974-80)...Show More Summary

Was the greatest contribution to American prosperity the resettling of refugees?

Andrew Grove died yesterday. From the New York Times obituary, the former Intel engineer and chief was “chosen Man of the Year by Time magazine as the person most responsible for the amazing growth in the power and the innovative … Continue reading ? The post Was the greatest contribution to American prosperity the resettling of refugees? appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Links I liked

My colleague Jeff Lax answers questions on filling the Supreme Court vacancy Retraction watch (in PLOS One): “Following publication, readers raised concerns about language in the article that makes references to a ‘Creator’, and about the overall rationale and findings … Continue reading ? The post Links I liked appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Karl Marx’s seven habits of highly effective people?

Via Ken Opalo and Stéphane Helleringer this reportedly from a Prussian spy who visited Karl Marx in the 1850s: In private life he is an extremely disorderly, cynical human being, and a bad host. He leads the existence of a … Continue reading ? The post Karl Marx’s seven habits of highly effective people? appeared first on Chris Blattman.

IPA’s weekly links

Happy St. Patrick’s day, how about some qualitative macroeconomic research explaining Irish attitudes towards austerity? (Summary: early on, the Irish public was surprisingly accepting of austerity measures, which may come down to an Irish Catholic moral principle of “you should … Continue reading ? The post IPA’s weekly links appeared first on Chris Blattman.

How the GOP defeated David Duke in 1991

Back in 1991, Duke finished second to Democrat Edwin Edwards in the state’s multiparty primary. In the ensuing run-off between Duke and Edwards, GOP incumbent Buddy Roemer—the third-place finisher in the primary—endorsed Edwards, not Duke. Show More Summary

Links I liked

The madness of elite airline status (first world 1% problems) Should English be the only official language of the EU? Tim Burton confirms Beetlejuice 2 is a go A nice example of classy replication/criticism and a classy response in Science: … Continue reading ? The post Links I liked appeared first on Chris Blattman.

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