Blog Profile / Chris Blattman's Blog


URL :http://chrisblattman.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Political Science
Posts on Regator:1690
Posts / Week:4.8
Archived Since:July 25, 2008

Blog Post Archive

“Here’s where the world’s 19.6 billion chickens are”

Part of an oddly fascinating Vox post by Brad Plumer:I expect some PhD student to use this as an instrumental variable soon. If I knew for what maybe I’d be writing the paper right now… The post “Here’s where the world’s 19.6 billion chickens are” appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Will my job soon be replaced by robots?

A new robot just discovered that a mixture of elements that can fight cancer can also treat malaria. Will artificial intelligence be able to unearth life-saving drugs quicker and more inexpensively than humans can? Each day, the robot scientist checks … Continue reading ? The post Will my job soon be replaced by robots? appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Links I liked

Slow runners live longest (I should live to 120) Can US foreign aid buy hearts and minds? Create a font from your own handwriting The Netflix teaser trailer for Daredevil Make your own Walking Dead selfie The post Links I liked appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Work for me as a Research Assistant in New York for up to 2 years

The job posting is here. It is through Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) and J-PAL Please only apply or ask questions via the instructions on the IPA website, and not by emailing me, as I only see the short list … Continue reading ? The post Work for me as a Research Assistant in New York for up to 2 years appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Social science is not a real science because it only published positive results?

Joachim Voth points me to a paper that looks for a “hierarchy of science” according to whether or not the discipline publishes null results. Here’s how a sample of papers perform, by discipline: You can quibble with sampling, sampleShow More Summary

“The end of privacy”

That’s the theme of the latest Science issue, which is ungated for a very short while. then ironically it will be private again. The post “The end of privacy” appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Kung Fu ‘Metrics

I assign Angrist and Pischke’s Mostly Harmless Econometrics in virtually all of my graduate courses in economics and political science, largely because it’s one of the best, most practical, and most readable guides to causal inference out there. But it’s still … Continue reading ? The post Kung Fu ‘Metrics appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Is this the most exciting or depressing document I read all week? (Mining conglomerates edition)

The OECD has gotten mining companies together to sign an agreement on what they will and won’t do. Joan Esteban pointed me to Annex 2, on the lists of things the companies commit not to do: While sourcing from, or operating … Continue...Show More Summary

The causes and consequences of the Ebola hysteria

Readers may recall the debate on this blog about whether or not the Ebola hysteria was indeed hysterical and counterproductive, or a necessary and sensible response to an out-of-control crisis. Yesterday, in the New York Times, Rachel...Show More Summary

What does it say about my blog that about 4 gazillion people have emailed me this cartoon?

That statement has a p>.1. It is from xkcd, the greatest nerd comic strip in history. The post What does it say about my blog that about 4 gazillion people have emailed me this cartoon? appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Andrew Gelman’s mistrust of behavioral economics

Gelman, a Columbia statistician and political scientist, voices his discomfort with the behavioralist research and policy attitudes of recent years: I see a common thread in a lot of the counterintuitive, tabloid, Psychological-Science-type...Show More Summary

Picture of the day #2: Piggy and Kermit visit The Empire Strikes Back

There are more.   The post Picture of the day #2: Piggy and Kermit visit The Empire Strikes Back appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Picture of the day #1: If Frodo had Google Maps

Missing: alternate routes, street view, and (thank you commenter) orc traffic. Source. Hat tip to @TimHarford The post Picture of the day #1: If Frodo had Google Maps appeared first on Chris Blattman.

The deal with “Serial”

I’ve been training, planing, taxi-ing, and busing around Europe for conferences and talks, which turned out to be the perfect amount of time to listen to the twelve podcast episodes. (Free!) In case you are not sure what I mean, … Continue reading ? The post The deal with “Serial” appeared first on Chris Blattman.

“Why is terror Islamist?”

Stephen Fish from Berkeley asks this question in the Washington Post Monkey Cage. The core of his answer: …the truth is, in the contemporary world, Christians won big. And the frustration and humiliation that Muslims now feel as a result can … Continue reading ? The post “Why is terror Islamist?” appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Just say no, redux

Here’s a more extreme version of the same principle. Adopt a rule that no new task can be deferred: if accepted, it must be the new priority. Last come, first served. The immediate consequence is that no project may be … Continue reading ? The post Just say no, redux appeared first on Chris Blattman.

The New York Times takes an early lead for correction of the year

An earlier version of this article misstated the name of the country whose army chased Tommy Caldwell’s kidnappers. As the article correctly noted elsewhere, Caldwell was in Kyrgyzstan, not Kyrzbekistan, which does not exist. Source....Show More Summary

Grading Bill and Melinda Gates’ annual letter

It’s my second year, so this makes it a tradition. I take the conceit of grading it like one of my development class exams. But this year I do it in the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog. The letter makes a “big … Continue reading ? The post Grading Bill and Melinda Gates’ annual letter appeared first on Chris Blattman.

What the cost of your wedding says about the chances you divorce

Specifically, the study found that women whose wedding cost more than $20,000 divorced at a rate roughly 1.6 times higher than women whose wedding cost between $5,000 and $10,000. And couples who spent $1,000 or less on their big day … Continue reading ? The post What the cost of your wedding says about the chances you divorce appeared first on Chris Blattman.

Links I liked

Russ Roberts interviews Josh Angrist, king of causality Does LaTeX lead to more paper errors than R? (I prefer LyX) (Hat tip to Development Impact blog for the last two) AEJ Applied has an astonishingly good special issue devoted to microfinance … Continue reading ? The post Links I liked appeared first on Chris Blattman.

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