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Blog Profile / Rogue Classicism


URL :http://rogueclassicism.com/
Filed Under:History / Ancient History
Posts on Regator:13483
Posts / Week:37.7
Archived Since:February 17, 2008

Blog Post Archive

RepiTitiationes ~ 10/31/14

All Hallow’s Eve Classical Blogosphere and other tweetery: #clsblgs ~ Dorothy King's PhDiva: Vampires and Garlic … http://t.co/1PpdmNKhJQ — rogueclassicist (@rogueclassicist) October 31, 2014 #clsblgs ~ Le monde romain de 70 av. J.-C. Show More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 10/30/14

Around the Classical Blogo/Twittersphere yesterday: #clsblgs ~ Épigrammes grecs des terres bulgares. | Spartokos a lu http://t.co/lIZRrUxyu9 — rogueclassicist (@rogueclassicist) October 30, 2014 Ancient Greek heroine has modern relevance...Show More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 10/29/14

Yesterday in the Classical Blogo-twittersphere … Bleckmann, Stickler (ed.), Griechische Profanhistoriker des fünften nachchristlichen Jahrhunderts.BMCR : 2014.10.52 http://t.co/Yjv2TTKI2M — rogueclassicist (@rogueclassicist) OctoberShow More Summary

Possibly a New Feature ~ repiTitiationes

I was thinking it might be useful to post a summary of my Titiationes from time to time … much is done in Twitter now that I used to post here … The equipment of the Roman soldier/marine found on the beach at Herculaneum – sadly not generally on display pic.twitter.com/pYmb2kw2Uh — Adrian Murdoch (@adrianmurdoch) […]

Sphinx Head from Amphipolis? Maybe … Maybe Not

The twittersphere was all agog yesterday as the Ministry of Culture released photos of a head found by the archaeologists which is being touted as the heads of one of the headless sphinges guarding the entrance to the tomb at Amphipolis. Here’s the offical photos released by the Ministry Kathimerini’s coverage provides the relevant info […]

Implications of the Hades/Persephone Mosaic at Amphipolis

As most rogueclassicism readers know by now, a spectacular mosaic depicting the abduction of Persephone by Hades was revealed last week at Amphipolis and is causing quite a stir for a number of reasons, not least of which is that such things have not been depicted in Macedonian tomb before, much less a royal Macedonian […]

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem viii idus octobres

ante diem viii idus octobres ludi Augustales scaenici (day 4 — from 11-19 A.D. and post 23 A.D.) ludi Augustales scaenici (day 6 — from 19-23 A.D.)

This Day in Ancient History: pridie nonas octobres

 pridie nonas octobres ludi Augustales scaenici (day 2 — from 11-19 A.D. and post 23 A.D.) — — festival in honour of Augustus involving primarily mime and pantomime theatrical displays ludi Augustales scaenici (day 4 — from 19-23 A.D.) 105 B.C. — the Cimbri inflict a massive defeat on Roman legions at Arausio 68 B.C. […]

Classical Query: Trees Are Alphabets??

Please help Matthew McGowan, who writes in with a query: I received a note from a poet friend about the Roland Barthes quotation from his “Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes” book (1977, p. 41): “According to the Greeks, trees are alphabets.” I assumed it might be from Aristotle or Theophrastus, but have not been able […]

Catching Up With Developments at Amphipolis

It’s been almost a month since our last major post on the excavations at Amphipolis (Amphipolis Tomb Possibly Looted in Antiquity? I am Officially Confused!) and nearly as long since we speculated on who (if anyone) might be eventually found in the tomb (Thinking Out Loud About the Amphipolis Tomb ~ The Rogueclassicist Speculates). School has […]

Thinking Out Loud About the Amphipolis Tomb ~ The Rogueclassicist Speculates

School starts tomorrow so I don’t know whether I’ll have time to flesh this out today, but I want to put this suggestion out there. It actually builds on assorted things proposed by plenty of folks but adds something original, I think. Here’s my speculation on the tomb based on recent things: 1. It is […]

Podcast ~ Drunk Archaeology: Trafficking Culture: Looting/Illicit Trade

The official description: YAY! Here’s the second episode of the Drunk Archaeology podcast! In this 65-min program, Donna Yates of anonymousswisscollector.com, Meg Lambert of traffickingculture.org, and Sarah Parcak of the Laboratory for Global Observation talk about looting and the illicit trade of antiquities. Show More Summary

Is this to-be-auctioned Inscription to Vitiris Known?

Before I get the blogosphere posts up, I need to ask about an eBay auction that distracted me last night. It concerns this stone: The text reads: DEO SAN CTO VITIRI LVNARIS VL VSLM As of today, it’s an ebay listing at: Ancient Roman Stone Votive Altar For The God Vitris – 3rd Century AD […]

Wooden Toilet Seat from Vindolanda

From a Vindolanda Trust press release: Finding something that you can relate to is always a special moment on an archaeological dig. At Vindolanda this is a common occurrence, a site where the special qualities lie not only in the discovery of gold and silver or artefacts which relate to the military might of the […]

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem v kalendas septembres

ante diem v kalendas septembres rites in honour of Sol and Luna near the Circus Maximus 29 B.C. dedication of the ara Victoriae in the Curia 430 A.D. — death of St. Augustine 1797 — birth of Karl Otfried Muller (Classical scholar and archaeologist)

Amphipolis Tomb Possibly Looted in Antiquity? I am Officially Confused!

In my precaffeinated minutes this a.m. I was jarred awake by a typically hyperbolating Daily Mail headline proclaiming: Game over for Greece’s mystery grave: Tomb raiders plundered site in antiquity – dashing hopes of finding artefacts dating back to Alexander the Great’s reign. Inter alia, a number of times the mantra was repeated, but here’s […]

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem vii kalendas septembres

ante diem vii kalendas septembres 55 B.C. — Julius Caesar invades Britain, but doesn’t stick around very long 1875 — Birth of John Buchan, 1st Baron of Tweedsmuir and Governor-General of Canada … and author of a decent biography of Augustus

The Iliad Abides …

Nice little opEd  in the Irish Times by Helen Meany on the enduring appeal of the Iliad … here’s the first bit: Amid the remembrance of the first World War, a poignant detail emerges. Many soldiers went to the Western Front carrying a copy of Homer’s Iliad. One soldier, Patrick Shaw-Stewart, inscribed a poem of […]

August 21 at Amphipolis ~ From the Ministry of Culture

HUGE tip o’ the pileus to Peggy Ringa (on facebook) for pointing me to the Ministry’s press releases. Here’s today’s activity in Greek (skinny to follow): ???????????? ?? ??????????? ???????? ??? ?????? ???????, ???? ????? ????? ??? ??? ?? ??????? ???????????? ??? ???????? ???????????, ???? ????????. ??????, ??????????????, ?? ???? ???????, ?????? ?? ????? ?????????? […]

This Day in Ancient History:

ante diem xii kalendas septembres Consualia — festival involving games/chariot races in honour of Consus and other assorted divinities; one of the races apparently featured chariots pulled by mules 753 B.C.(?) – rape of the Sabine women (which traditionally happened during the celebration of the above)

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