Blog Profile / Science Daily


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Filed Under:Academics / General Science
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Archived Since:September 10, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Lobster-eye imager detects soft X-ray emissions

A group of scientists have described developing and launching their imager, which centers on "Lobster-Eye optics," as well as its capabilities and future applications in space exploration.

Link between intestinal bacteria, depression found

The complex mechanisms of interaction and dynamics between the gut microbiota and its host have been illuminated by recent research. Data show that relatively minor changes in microbiota profiles or its metabolic activity induced by neonatal stress can have profound effects on host behavior in adulthood.

A new litmus test for chaos?

Researchers have come up with a new definition of chaos that applies more broadly than Lyapunov exponents and other previous definitions of chaos. The new definition fits on a few lines, can be easily approximated by numerical methods, and works for a wide variety of chaotic systems.

Origins of life: New model may explain emergence of self-replication on early Earth

One question of the origin of life in particular remains problematic: what enabled the leap from a primordial soup of individual monomers to self-replicating polymer chains? A new model proposes a potential mechanism by which self-replication could have emerged. Show More Summary

Link between mood, pain in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Depressive symptoms and mood in the moment may predict momentary pain among rheumatoid arthritis patients, according to researchers. Individuals in the study who reported greater depressive symptoms in general also reported more common pain and restrictions in daily life. This effect of depressive symptoms was not due to differences in day-to-day mood.

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according to the new research.

Humpback whale recovery in Australia: A cause for celebration

Australia has one of the highest rates of animal species that face extinction in the world. However, over the last decade, there have been animals that are rebounding. One example is the conservation success story of the recovery of the humpback whales that breed in Australian waters. Show More Summary

Study finds unexpected biases against teen girls' leadership

Are today's teen girls poised to close the gender gap tomorrow? A new research report suggests that teen girls face a powerful barrier to leadership: gender bias.

'Seeing' molecular interactions could give boost to organic electronics

For the first time, researchers have directly seen how organic molecules bind to other materials at the atomic level. Using a special kind of electron microscopy, this information can lead to increasing the life span of electronic devices, for example.

Race, institutional factors play an important role in pharmacogenomic trial participation

The participation rate of patients in pharmacogenomic trials has been the focus of recent study. The research has concluded that there are a number of factors at the patient, physician, institution and community level that serve as incentives or hindrances for clinical trial participation, including beliefs and attitudes, awareness, opportunities and resources.

Stress hormone reduces heroin cravings

Every addiction is characterized by a strong desire for a certain addictive substance, be it nicotine, alcohol or other drug. Researchers recently conducted a study on heroin addiction and demonstrated that the stress hormone cortisol can reduce addictive cravings.

Washington, DC sinking fast, adding to threat of sea-level rise

New research confirms that the land under the Chesapeake Bay is sinking rapidly and projects that Washington, DC, could drop by six or more inches in the next century -- adding to the problems of sea-level rise.

Fire seasons have become longer

A new analysis of 35 years of meteorological data confirms fire seasons have become longer. Fire season, which varies in timing and duration based on location, is defined as the time of year when wildfires are most likely to ignite, spread, and affect resources.

Identifying ever-growing disturbances leading to freak waves

Physicists now better understand wave systems exhibiting unusual disturbances by identifying growing localized patterns as early indicators of such disturbances.

Arrow of time: New understanding of causality, free choice, and why we remember the past but not the future

Theoretical physicists have developed a fully-symmetric formulation of quantum theory which establishes an exact link between asymmetry and the fact that we can remember the past but not the future.

Report documents an unmet need for expanded family planning services at CHCs

As part of a unique survey of nearly 2,000 women of childbearing age who receive health care at the nation's community health centers, 90 percent reported that they were not actively seeking to become pregnant in the next 12 months. Yet more than three out of 10 were not using contraceptives at the time of the survey.

UV light can kill foodborne pathogens on certain fruits

The growing organic produce industry may soon have a new way to ensure the safety of fresh fruits. Scientists have shown that ultraviolet C light is effective against foodborne pathogens on the surface of certain fruits.

Technology helps personalized medicine, enabling epigenomic analysis with a mere 100 cells

A new technology is improving the efficiency of the studies in epigenomics. The examination of epigenomes requires mapping DNA interactions with a certain protein in the entire genome. This epigenomic characterization potentially allows...Show More Summary

New treatment may help neonatal liver disease associated with parenteral nutrition

Exogenous glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) treatment may help fight neonatal parenteral nutrition associated liver disease (PNALD), a new study suggests.

Omega-3 fatty acids may help improve treatment, quality of life in cancer patients

Adding omega-3 fatty acids to anti-tumor medications may improve treatment response and quality of life for cancer patients according to a new study. The study examined 50 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

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