Blog Profile / Science Daily


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Archived Since:September 10, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Silk bio-ink could help advance tissue engineering with 3-D printers

Advances in 3-D printing have led to new ways to make bone and some other relatively simple body parts that can be implanted in patients. But finding an ideal bio-ink has stalled progress toward printing more complex tissues with versatile functions -- tissues that can be loaded with pharmaceuticals, for example. Show More Summary

Two-color X-rays give scientists 3-D view of the unknown

Scientists can now get a high-resolution view of a sample or the details of the first steps in ultra-fast processes, thanks to new research.

Flu study, on hold, yields new vaccine technology

Vaccines to protect against an avian influenza pandemic as well as seasonal flu may be mass produced more quickly and efficiently using new technology.

Only above-water microbes play a role in cave development

Only the microbes located above the water's surface contribute to the development of hydrogen-sulfide-rich caves, suggests an international team of researchers. Since 2004, researchers have been studying the Frasassi cave system, an actively developing limestone cave system located 1500 feet underground in central Italy.

Super solar cells collect higher energy photons 30 times better

A team of scientists have created solar cells that collect higher energy photons at 30 times the concentration of conventional solar cells, the highest luminescent concentration factor ever recorded.

Seeing the forest and the trees, all three trillion of them

A new international study estimates that there are more than 3 trillion trees on Earth, about seven and a half times more than some previous estimates. But the total number of trees has plummeted by roughly 46 percent since the start of human civilization. Show More Summary

Change in environment can lead to rapid evolution

A new study is showing that rapid evolution can occur in response to environmental changes.

The symmetry of the universe

Why did anti-matter disappear almost completely from our universe, whereas matter did not? Scientists are attempting to solve this mystery at the European research institute at CERN. Now they published the most precise measurement of the properties of light atomic nuclei and anti-nuclei ever made.

Cooperative carbon capture by a novel material that mimics a plant enzyme

Scientists discovered a material that exhibits an unprecedented mechanism for carbon dioxide capture-and-release with only small shifts in temperature. The material’s structure closely resembles an enzyme found in plants that captures carbon dioxide for conversion into nutrients.

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered

A group of scientists using computer generated simulation have predicted the existence of a new two-dimensional carbon material, a 'patchwork.'

Reversible Writing with Light

The medium is the message. Scientists have now given new meaning to this maxim: An innovative method they have now demonstrated for getting nanoparticles to self-assemble focuses on the medium in which the particles are suspended; these assemblies can be used, among other things, for reversibly writing information.

Evidence that Earth's first mass extinction was caused by critters not catastrophe

The Earth's first mass extinction event 540 million years ago was caused not by a meteorite impact or volcanic super-eruption but by the rise of early animals that dramatically changed the prehistoric environment.

Making fuel from light

Photosynthesis has given life to the planet. While scientists have been studying and mimicking the natural phenomenon in the laboratory for years, understanding how to replicate the chemical process behind it has largely remained a mystery -- until now.

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base

If two-dimensional boron can be made at all, the material's substrate will have a significant impact on its final form, according to scientists.

Feeling blue and seeing blue: Sadness may impair color perception

The world might seem a little grayer than usual when we're down in the dumps and we often talk about 'feeling blue' -- new research suggests that the associations we make between emotion and color go beyond mere metaphor. The results of two studies indicate that feeling sadness may actually change how we perceive color.

Study provides insights into the mechanisms of fine-tuning of wheat to diverse environments

A researcher has helped identify the last major vernalization gene in wheat. Vernalization genes define when the plant begins to flower and is critical for adaptation to different environments. The finding will help wheat breeders design wheat varieties that can adapt and thrive in changing environments around the world.

New symptom may help identify sleep apnea in older women

Obstructive sleep apnea may be underdiagnosed in postmenopausal women. A new study strongly associates the condition's traditional risk factors with nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting), suggesting that it may be an additional screening factor for doctors to consider.

3D printing revives bronze-age music

An archaeologist has 3D-printed a replica of an iron-age artifact to revive a rich musical culture in ancient Ireland, uncovering evidence that the artifact may have been a mouthpiece from an iron-age horn and not a spear-butt as previously thought.

Marine creature's magic trick explained

Crystal structures on the sea sapphire's back appear differently depending on the angle of reflection, scientists report, solving an unanswered question about this creature.

Study uses internet, social media to show how fracking documentary influenced public perception, political change

A new study is the first to use the Internet and social media to systematically show how a documentary film reshaped public perception and ultimately led to municipal bans on hydraulic fracking.

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