Blog Profile / Evo and Proud


URL :http://www.evoandproud.blogspot.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Anthropology
Posts on Regator:244
Posts / Week:0.7
Archived Since:October 4, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Guess who first came to America?

Semang from the Malayan Peninsula, Wikicommons Before the Europeans came, the Americas were settled by three waves of people from northeast Asia: the oldest wave beginning some 12,000 to 15,000 years ago, which gave rise to most Amerindians,...Show More Summary

Survival of the nicest-smelling?

The Perfume Maker, Rudolf Ernst (1854-1932) (Wikicommons) It has long been known that we vary not only in our sensitivity to different smells but also in our preferences for them—the degree to which they seem pleasant or unpleasant.Show More Summary

Not everyone does it

Un homme et une femme, 1891, Stephan Sinding (1846-1922). Almost as fun as sex. All humans love to kiss, so kissing must go back to early hominids and even chimps and bonobos. This is how ethologists and evolutionary psychologists think when they write about the subject. Show More Summary

The puzzle of European hair, eye, and skin color

Mary Magdalene, Frederick Sandys (1829-1904). Is the physical appearance of Europeans solely or even mainly an adaptation to climate? The Russian online magazine Kultura VRNhas published an article I wrote on the "puzzle of European hair, eye, and skin color." The following is the original English text. Show More Summary

The Jews of West Africa?

Bronze vessel in the form of a snail shell, 9th century, Igbo-Ukwu (Wikicommons). The Igbo developed metallurgy much earlier than the rest of West Africa. There has been much talk here about Chanda Chisala's article "The IQ gap is no...Show More Summary

Young, male, and single

The Babylonian Marriage Market, by Edwin Long (1829-1891). There are too many young men on the mate market, particularly in the White American community. It sucks being young, male, and single. Don't think so? Go to the Interactive Singles Map of the United States and see how it looks for the 20 to 39 age group. Show More Summary

Gender reassignment of children. Does it really help?

"Flower boy" (on the right) - In 70-80% of cases, gender confusion will clear up on its own (Wikicommons: Recoplado). I remember feeling some attraction to girls in Grade 2, but it really wasn't until Grade 8 that everything fell into place. Show More Summary

Feeling the other's pain

In the Reign of Terror, by Jessie Macgregor (1891). We don’t respond equally to signs of emotional distress in other people (Wikicommons) We like to think that all pe ople feel empathy to the same degree. In reality, it varies a lot from one person to the next, like most mental traits. Show More Summary

Imagining the future, imagining death

On Star Trek, African Americans were underrepresented among guest actors, who were just as likely to be part-Asian actresses like France Nuyen (Wikicommons) Only six years separate the production of Logan's Run (1976) from that of Blade Runner(1982), yet those intervening years form a watershed in how science fiction imagined the future. Show More Summary

The monster in the mirror

Cyborg She, a love story about a female android and a shy young man (credit: Gaga Communications, for use in critical commentary) Can humans and robots get along together? Actually, they already do in a wide range of applications from surgery to assembly lines. Show More Summary

Birth of a word

Memorial service for Walter Rathenau (Wikicommons - German Federal Archives). His assassination introduced a new word into French and, shortly after, into English. A reader has written me about my last post: It is extremely unlikely that "racism" is an attempt at translating something like Völkismus. Show More Summary

Age of reason

Rally in Sydney (Wikicommons). Antiracists see themselves as open-minded individuals at war with hardline ideologues. The interwar years gave antiracism a new lease on life, thus reversing a long decline that had begun in the late 19th century. Show More Summary

Behaviorism and the revival of antiracism

John B. Watson conditioning a child to fear Santa Claus. With a properly controlled environment, he felt that children can be conditioned to think and behave in any way desired After peaking in the mid-19th century, antiracism fell into decline in the U.S., remaining dominant only in the Northeast. Show More Summary

Impressions of Russia

The Battle for Sevastopol, now showing in Russian theatres The young man shook his head. “No, I can’t say I’m pro-Putin. There’s too much corruption in Russia, with too much money going to the wrong people. We should become more Western. Show More Summary

More on the younger Franz Boas

As a professor at Columbia, Franz Boas encountered the elite liberal culture of the American Northeast, one example being Mary White Ovington, a founder of the NAACP (Wikicommons) Antiracism has roots that go back to early Christianity and the assimilationist Roman and Hellenistic empires. Show More Summary

The hidden past of Claude Lévi-Strauss

Claude L évi-Strauss, 1973 (Wikicommons) The anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss died six years ago, leaving behind a treasure trove of correspondence and unpublished writings. We can now trace where his ideas came from and how they evolved. Show More Summary

How many were already fathers?

Hanging outside Newgate Prison (Wikicommons) In England, executions peaked between 1500 and 1750 at 1 to 2% of all men of each generation. Were there genetic consequences? Were propensities for violence being removed from the gene pool?...Show More Summary

In the wrong place at the wrong time?

Dick Turpin was convicted of robbery but had also been guilty of a string of murders (Wikicommons) In each generation from 1500 to 1750, between 1 and 2% of all English men were executed either by court order or extra-judicially (at the scene of the crime or while in prison). Show More Summary

Coming home

Photo by Shawn Dear readers, I have returned to my old website, after being expelled from The Unz Review. The immediate cause was my decision to close commenting on my last column. A catfight was developing between myself and Ron Unz in the comments, and I wanted to give the two of us time to cool off. Show More Summary

Moving on ...

Dear readers,I've decided to complete my move to The Unz Review (www.unz.com), so there will be no further blogging at this site. I'm doing this partly to reduce my workload of supervising two websites and partly to gain more control over my posts at TUR (commenting, correction of errors in the post, etc.). Show More Summary

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC