Blog Profile / Evo and Proud


URL :http://www.evoandproud.blogspot.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Anthropology
Posts on Regator:250
Posts / Week:0.7
Archived Since:October 4, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Rotherham: The search for answers

A Bangladeshi youth gang in Tower Hamlets, London. (Source: Wikimedia Commons, Bangali71). Is this the kind of assimilation you had in mind? In my last post, I discussed the revelations from Rotherham, England. In a town of some 250,000 people, at least 1,400 school-age girls have been "groomed" for prostitution by organized gangs. Show More Summary

A nice place to raise your kids

Rotherham (source: Stanley Walker, geograph project, Wikimedia Commons) The English town of Rotherham has been in the news. Between 1997 and 2013, at least 1,400 school-age girls were "groomed" for prostitution—a process that begins with seduction and ends with confinement, trafficking, and serial rape. Show More Summary

Does Natural Law exist?

A widow about to be buried alive in her husband's grave (Wikimedia Commons). Do we all share the same sense of right and wrong? What, ultimately, is the basis for morality? In a comment on a previous post, fellow columnist Fred Reed argued that some things are self-evidently wrong, like torture and murder. Show More Summary

How modular is intelligence?

Great at reading or recognizing faces? You might not do so well on an IQ test. Source: Histoire naturelle générale et particulière avec la Description du Cabinet du Roy (1749) (Wikicommons) The English psychologist Charles Spearman was the first to argue that a single factor, called "g," explains most of the variability in human intelligence. Show More Summary

Getting the babes but not the babies

Still from the film Is Matrimony a Failure?(1922). Who's making more babies? "Good boys" or "bad boys"? Originally, the good boys were, thanks to parental monitoring of relations between single men and single women. The pendulum then swung toward the bad boys in the 1940s, only to swing back after the 1960s. Show More Summary

The agricultural revolution that wasn't

Originally from south China, Austronesians spread successively outward to Taiwan, Southeast Asia, and Oceania. Was farming the secret of their success? Or was it their mental makeup? (source: French Wikipedia - Maulucioni) About 10,000 years ago, the pace of human genetic evolution rose a hundred-fold ( Hawks et al., 2007 ). Show More Summary

Dear Fred

In a recent post, Fred Reed asks: Why should I not indulge my hobby of torturing to death the severely genetically retarded? This would seem beneficial. We certainly don't want them to reproduce, they use resources better invested in healthy children, and it makes no evolutionary difference whether they die quietly or screaming. Show More Summary

A new start

When geneticist Davide Piffer examined IQ-enhancing alleles at seven different genes, he found that their average prevalence differed among human populations, being highest in East Asians and lowest in Mbuti Pygmies (photo used with author's approval) My weekly posts are now appearing on The Unz Review ( http://www.unz.com/ ). Show More Summary

From Nazi Germany to Middletown: ratcheting up the war on racism

Licensed under public domain via Wikimedia Commons Ruth Benedict (1887-1948), much more than Franz Boas, would define the aims of Boasian anthropology for postwar America. When Franz Boas died in 1942, the leadership of his school of anthropology passed to Ruth Benedict and not to Margaret Mead. Show More Summary

The Franz Boas you never knew

The anthropologist Franz Boas is remembered for moving the social sciences away from genetic determinism and toward environmental determinism. In reality, he felt that genes do contribute substantially to mental and behavioral differences... Show More Summary

The origins of guilt: Darwin and Freud

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How universal is empathy?

Bronislaw Malinowski with natives on the Trobriand Islands (1918 - source). Pro-social behavior seems to be a human universal, but is the same true for full empathy? What is empathy? It has at least three components: - pro-social behavior,...Show More Summary

Negotiating the gap. Four academics and the dilemma of human biodiversity

I’ve published a second article in Open Behavioral Genetics: “Negotiating the gap. Four academics and the dilemma of human biodiversity.” You can read it as a PDF here or as a caliber ebook here. The foreword is reproduced below. Comments are welcome. Show More Summary

A hair-color allele of Neanderthal origin?

Taiwanese aboriginal children, Bunun village (source: Jeremy Kemp). 60-70% of Taiwanese aborigines have a loss-of-function allele at the main hair color gene, MC1R, yet their hair is as black as humans with the original “African” allele. Show More Summary

A new allele for blond hair

Geographic prevalence of the new allele for blond hair ( Guenther et al., 2014 ). Just one of many alleles that create the European palette of hair and eye colors. There is a widespread belief that whatever made Europeans fair-skinned also gave them their unique palette of hair and eye colors. Show More Summary

Rice farming and gene-culture co-evolution

Rice paddies, China, circa 1917-1923 (source). To grow rice, you must cooperate with neighbors for irrigation and labor. Today, even with the shift to a post-agricultural society, Chinese from rice-farming areas display less individualism and more interdependence than Chinese from wheat-farming areas. Show More Summary

The puzzle of European hair, eye, and skin color

T aylor Swift (photo by David Shankbone). The physical appearance of Europeans seems to result from a selection pressure that acted primarily on women and only secondarily on men. This is especially true for highly visible traits on or near the face—the focus of visual attention. Show More Summary

Another Robert Chambers?

Robert Chambers (1802-1871). His anonymously published book, Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation (1844), helped pave the way for public acceptance of Darwin’s theory of evolution. (source) I haven't yet read Nicholas Wade's book A Troublesome Inheritance. Show More Summary

A pathway to pro-social behavior

The digit ratio is the length of the index finger (2 nd finger) divided by the ring finger (4 th finger). It correlates with the degree of androgenization or estrogenization of fetal tissues, including the fetal brain. (source) As small...Show More Summary

What happened in the 1980s to reaction time?

A steady increase in reaction time seems to begin circa 1980 in Sweden, Great Britain, and the United States (h/t to hbd chick) Has reaction time been steadily increasing from generation to generation? This was the finding of a paper last year, which argued that mean IQ had fallen in Britain by 13 points since Victorian times (Woodley et al., 2013). Show More Summary

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