Blog Profile / The Pump Handle

Filed Under:Health / Epidemiology
Posts on Regator:442
Posts / Week:1.1
Archived Since:November 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Worth reading: Tuberculosis activism, “locker room talk,” and Clean Air Act enforcement

Recent pieces address activism to improve the fight against tuberculosis; speaking up against sexual harassment and assault; and more.

EPA announces first chemicals for “fast-track” under new chemical law – Selection highlights law’s limitations and continuing role for states

EPA's first major action under new TSCA highlights the law’s limitations and points to continuing role for states in protecting the public from toxic exposures.

New York farmworker, worker centers sue for organizing rights: ‘This would be a huge victory’

In September 2015, New York farmworker Crispin Hernandez was fired after his employers saw him talking with local workers’ rights advocates. But instead of backing down, Hernandez filed suit against the state. And if he prevails, it could help transform the often dangerous and unjust workplace conditions that farmworkers face to put food on all of our tables.

CDC: Cases of sexually transmitted diseases reach highest number ever

In troubling public health news, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported just yesterday that combined cases of gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia in the U.S. have climbed to the highest number on record.

Study finds dozens of health, medical organizations take soda company money

After years of alarming increases in child and adult obesity and billions spent to treat related medical problems, one might think health organizations and soda companies would be on firmly opposite sides of the fence. But a new study...Show More Summary

Roughneck’s serious injury: “It changes everything”

The profile of an injured worker in Wyoming puts a face on the issues raised in a recent Labor Department report.

When adults forgo their immunizations, it costs the nation billions in care

Another day, another study on the benefit of vaccines. This time, it’s a study on the economic cost of vaccine-preventable diseases among U.S. adults — a cost that likely surpasses your wildest guesses.

Study: Despite ACA’s success, consistent insurance coverage still a problem for many Americans

If you look at the numbers, there’s no doubt that the Affordable Care Act is making a positive difference. In fact, just last month, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that the nation’s uninsured rate had hit a record low. At the same time, the health reform law wasn’t intended as a silver bullet and a number of problems remain. One of those problems is known as “churning.”

In wake of Chevron Richmond fire, California aims to improve refinery safety

Safety advocates say, if done right, this has potential to improve process safety management nationwide.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Denver Post reporters investigate the lives and deaths of Colorado's oil and gas workers; employees from Donald Trump's California golf club say he only wanted to hire "pretty" women; cobalt mining in Congo comes with dangerous risks for adult and child workers; and Harvard's dining staff goes on strike for living wages.

Congress approves long-overdue Zika response funding

Just before the end of its September session, Congress finally did what public health officials had been begging it to do for more than seven months and approved substantial funding for Zika response efforts. That delay has entailed serious costs for public health.

Report: Black students, students with disabilities bear brunt of corporal punishment

Corporal punishment in America’s public schools seems like a relic of the past — a practice we had surely banned long ago. The reality, however, is that it’s perfectly legal to physically discipline students as young as preschoolers in 19 states. And according to a new report, corporal punishment is most often used against black students and students with disabilities.

Does workers’ comp fulfill its obligation to injured workers?

A Labor Department report describes the ways in which our state-based workers' compensation system is failing injured workers. Will the report become a roadmap for reform or another government report that collects dust?

Chemical Safety Board’s missed opportunity to build public confidence, push reforms

Charleston, WV residents lost confidence in government officials when they received conflicting information about the January 2014 contamination of their tap water. The Chemical Safety Board missed an opportunity last week to restore some of that trust.

Study: U.S. rate of babies born addicted to opioids has doubled

By now, the enormity of America’s opioid abuse and overdose epidemic is common knowledge. With 78 Americans dying every day from an opioid overdose and with enough painkillers prescribed to give just about every U.S. adult their own bottle of pills, there’s hardly a community that’s gone untouched by the deadly problem. Show More Summary

Project TENDR: A call to action to protect children from harmful neurotoxins

Just 10 years ago, it wouldn’t have been possible to bring leading physicians, scientists and advocates together in a consensus on toxic chemicals and neurological disorders in children, says Maureen Swanson. But with the science increasing “exponentially,” she said the time was ripe for a concerted call to action.

Farmworker advocates ask EPA to ban widely used, highly toxic pesticide

Farmworker and health groups submitted a petition to EPA urging the agency to immediately suspend the use of chlorpyrifos, a neurotoxic pesticide implicated in acute farmworker poisonings.

Occupational Health News Roundup

New Jersey's growing temp industry is rife with labor violations, worker mistreatment; advocates in North Carolina demand safer conditions for poultry plant workers; former Wells Fargo workers sue over aggressive sales quotas that led to fraud; and an investigation into northern California's marijuana industry finds rampant sexual abuse and assault.

Worth reading: Antibiotic resistance, invisible workforce, and detectives dismissing rape allegations

Recent pieces adress how the UN plans to address antibiotic resistance; New Jersey's temp worker industry; Baltimore detectives' dismissals of rape allegations with insufficient investigation; and more.

Report: New York City’s paid sick leave law had virtually no negative impact

Despite all the concern about shuttered businesses, fired employees and lost profits, a new report has found that New York City’s paid sick leave law was pretty much a “non-event” for most employers.

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