Blog Profile / The Pump Handle


URL :http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/
Filed Under:Health / Epidemiology
Posts on Regator:424
Posts / Week:1
Archived Since:November 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Report: New York City’s paid sick leave law had virtually no negative impact

Despite all the concern about shuttered businesses, fired employees and lost profits, a new report has found that New York City’s paid sick leave law was pretty much a “non-event” for most employers.

My hot mail carrier, his boss’ air conditioned sedan

The temperature yesterday in Austin, TX was 97 and the heat index was 104. My USPS mail carrier was feeling the heat in more ways than one.

Global supply chains still full of sweatshops

In the early 1990s, sports apparel giant Nike became the “poster child” for sweatshops in its global supply chain – child labor, forced labor (mandatory overtime), wage theft, confiscation of migrant workers’ passports, sexual harassment of women workers, and unsafe and unhealthy working conditions. Jump ahead 25 years, vast global supply chains with multiple tiers…

Polio cases in Nigeria are bad news for eradication effort

Last summer, Nigeria celebrated having gone a year without a case of polio. But then last month, two children in Nigeria were diagnosed with polio paralysis, in Borno state (in northeastern Nigeria) in areas liberated from Boko Haram militants.

Study: Fracking chemicals linked to reproductive health abnormalities in mice

In a new study — the first of its kind — researchers fed water laced with fracking chemicals to pregnant mice and then examined their female offspring for signs of impaired fertility. They found negative effects at both high and low chemical concentrations, which raises red flags for human health as well.

Not an “accident”: Emilio Dodd, 55, suffers fatal work-related injury in Lewisville, TX

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, September 6, in Lewisville, TX

Dangerous chemicals, dangerous technology – Industry’s persistent push to protect asbestos

Users of asbestos in the chlor-alkali industry do not want EPA to list asbestos as one of its priority chemicals. They claim it can be used safely. The industry's record of controlling hazards does not support their assertion.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Oklahoma Supreme Court rules against state's opt-out workers' compensation law; asbestos removal companies accused of discriminatory hiring; new research finds New York City's paid sick leave law barely impacted businesses and hiring; and researchers predict that raising Colorado's minimum wage will pump millions into the local economy.

US uninsurance rate continues to decline, but state actions threaten gains

New estimates from CDC's National Center for Health Statistics show the uninsurance rate has continued to decline -- but actions in some states threaten Medicaid expansion gains.

Labor Day report: ‘The worker justice movement is on a winning streak’

Earlier this week, we published our annual report, “The Year In U.S. Occupational Health & Safety: Fall 2015 – Summer 2016,” chronicling the victories, setbacks and struggles taking place in the American workplace. But it was just about...Show More Summary

Defending their toxics – Industry pushes to protect its preferred chemicals under the new TSCA

As the EPA begins implementing the Frank Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act, the chemical industry is already busy pushing the agency to limit scrutiny of various widely used but highly toxic chemicals.

Fatal work injury that killed Harold Felton, 36, was preventable, Washington-OSHA cites Alki Construction

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Harold Felton, 36, could have been prevented had Alki Construction followed worker safety regulations.

Reset the Doomsday Clock?

Both Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump have suggested their respective administration's would have more aggressive nuclear weapons policies. Knowing that, I wonder if it's time to consider moving the hands of the Doomsday Clock closer to midnight.

Will Congress (belatedly) do the right thing on Zika?

Since Congress left for recess seven weeks ago without approving funding to address the Zika virus, the Obama administration has declared a public health emergency in Puerto Rico and the Florida Health Department has identified two areas in Miami-Dade County with local transmission of Zika.

Labor Day report highlights some of the year’s best news reporting, research

From the weakening of workers’ compensation to the lives of America’s nuclear plant workers, it was another year of stellar news reporting on worker health and safety.

A Labor Day Tradition: Yearbook on US Occupational Health & Safety 2016

The fifth edition of The Year in U.S. Occupational Health and Safety recaps the key events over the last 12 months in government agencies, notable publications by academic researchers and public interest organizations, and exceptional reporting by investigative journalists.

EPA and the new TSCA – Stakeholders push agency in divergent directions  

As EPA begins work under the Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act, more striking divisions are emerging between what environmental health advocates and what chemical manufacturing and industry groups want from the law.

Federal oversight of Cal/OSHA – What is it good for?

The most recent annual Federal OSHA evaluation report of Cal/OSHA highlights progress made in some areas, but continuing failure to meet several minimum federal benchmarks as well as requirements of California law.  The underlying causes of these ongoing problems are chronic understaffing of field compliance officers and a lack of political will in the agency’s leadership. 

Occupational Health News Roundup

Restaurant workers in California experience severe injuries and disability; OSHA pushes back against a judge's ruling in poultry plant inspection case; Gov. Chris Christie vetoes a $15 minimum wage bill; and the women making Nike products in Vietnam often earn poverty wages and face grueling production expectations.

Two decades after welfare reform, more deep poverty and fewer college degrees

Two decades ago, President Bill Clinton signed the “Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act” (PRWORA) and heralded the end of “welfare as we know it.” The law lived up to that promise, but the outcomes for families who depend on it have been problematic.

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