Blog Profile / The Pump Handle


URL :http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/
Filed Under:Health / Epidemiology
Posts on Regator:385
Posts / Week:1
Archived Since:November 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Worth reading: Racism, fighting epidemics, and environmental justice in Cleveland

Recent pieces address racism, stress, and mortality; an interview with CDC Director Tom Frieden on Zika; why mocking environmental justice in Cleveland is especially inappropriate; and more.

Not an “accident”: Timothy Dubberly, 58, suffers fatal work-related injury in Fernandina Beach, FL

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, July 16, in Fernandina Beach, FL.

Convenience store operators snub crime-prevention ordinances

Dallas and Houston have city ordinances in place to reduce the risk of violence perpetrated against convenience store clerks. NIOSH researchers found that few establishments comply with the law.

Occupational Health News Roundup

An in-depth look at the troubling experiences of women in the trucking industry; a group of Teamsters are stopped by police for leafleting in Georgia; new National Labor Relations Board ruling a win for temp workers; and researchers reveal a big gender wage gap among physicians in academic medicine.

President Obama on the ACA: Many achievements, much left to do

In a Special Communication published in JAMA, President Obama assesses the Affordable Care Act's progress and recommends additional steps for elected officials to take to improve US healthcare.

Worker survey finds chemicals, poor air quality among top health concerns on the job

In a new national survey, about one in every four U.S. workers rates their workplace as just “fair” or “poor” in providing a healthy working environment. And employees in low-paying jobs typically report worse working conditions than those in higher-paying jobs — in fact, nearly half of workers in low-paying jobs say they face “potentially dangerous” conditions on the job.

Is OSHA expecting too little from violators?

One year an amputated foot. Another year two amputated legs. Could OSHA's deal after the first incident done more to prevent the second one?

Kudos to open government groups for new FOIA law

Our democracy is much stronger when watchdogs have access to agency records to expose mismanagement, ineptitude, and abuse of power. Kudos to advocates and lawmakers who persisted in making improvements to FOIA.

NIOSH’s metal/nonmetal miner health effort seeks new data sources, collaborators

Mining is one of the most dangerous jobs in America, with more than 600 workers dying in fatal workplace incidents between 2004 and the beginning of July. And many more miners die long after they’ve left the mines from occupational illnesses such as black lung disease, while others live with the debilitating aftermath of workplace injuries. Show More Summary

Obesity, sexual orientation, and getting to a “healthy weight”

When a group of researchers supported by the HHS Office on Women's Health set about designing a weight-loss intervention for lesbian and bisexual LB women, they ran into a challenge: Many lesbian and bisexual women are averse to the idea of weight loss.

Disease outbreak guarantees: A proposal to build public health capacity in developing nations

In 2005, the World Health Assembly adopted a revised version of its International Health Regulations, a legally binding treaty among 196 nations to boost global health security and strengthen the world’s capacity to confront serious disease threats such as Ebola and SARS. Show More Summary

Gun violence epidemic: let’s try a public health approach

Addressing violence requires looking upstream at social determinants of health, including racism and economic inequality. It's the uncomfortable task we continue to avoid.

Whole Woman’s Health decision important but not a fix-all

The 5-3 Supreme Court decision in Whole Woman's Health v. Hellerstedt last week was a welcome step for women's health, but resulted in the removal of only some of the barriers many US women still face in accessing abortion services.

Higher OSHA penalties ahead, discounts on danger remain

Congress fixed a loophole and OSHA penalties will now be adjusted regularly to account for inflation. But if Labor Secretary Perez is serious about leveling the playing field for those who follow the law, he should consider what's being called OSHA's "discount on death."

Three BNSF rail workers killed in head-on collision

Three railroad workers were killed on June 29 when two BNSF locomotives crashed head-on into each other. "Positive train control" could have prevented the collision, but regulatory deadlines were delayed by industry lobbying.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Detroit Free Press reporters investigate Michigan's flawed worker safety oversight system; workers in China's fireworks factories face life-threatening conditions; New Mexico farmworkers win major workers' comp victory; and OSHA rules in worker's favor in asbestos retaliation case.

Study: U.S. health care system a top global emitter of greenhouse gas emissions

Dr. Jodi Sherman wants to expand the medical profession’s understanding of patient safety far beyond the exam room and hospital bed. For Sherman, the oft-heard medical mantra of “first do no harm” should also push the health care system to do more to reduce its harmful air emissions and their impact on people’s health.

Are low wages an occupational health hazard? Two public health researchers say ‘yes’

Low wages certainly impact a person’s health, from where people live to what they eat to how often they can visit a doctor. And low and stagnant wages certainly contribute to poverty, which is a known risk factor for poor health and premature mortality. But should low wages be considered an occupational health hazard?

Fatal work injury that killed Eric McClellan was preventable, Virginia-OSHA cites Reynolds Metals

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Eric McClellan could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Hospital lab technicians’ breast cancer deemed work-related

Canada's Supreme Court ruled on June 24 that breast cancer can be considered work-related under the country’s workers’ compensation law. Three women who were employed as lab technicians at a hospital in British Columbia argued that the hormone-mimicking chemicals in their workplace was a factor in developing breast cancer.

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