Blog Profile / The Pump Handle


URL :http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/
Filed Under:Health / Epidemiology
Posts on Regator:402
Posts / Week:1
Archived Since:November 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Study finds Berkeley soda tax led to a huge decrease in sugary drink consumption

On the question of whether a soda tax can actually reduce the amount of sugary drinks people consume, a new study finds the resounding answer is “yes.”

Protecting those most vulnerable to chemical exposures: How will the EPA decide who gets protected under the new TSCA?

The newly passed Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to protect those most vulnerable to chemical exposures. Exactly who it will protect and how the EPA will interpret this requirement remains to be seen.

Worth reading: Politics and public health

Recent pieces address Congress's failure to address Zika (by a pregnant Miami reporter), political parties' different approaches to public health, pregnancy-related deaths in Texas, and more.

Not an “accident”: Rick Simer, 64, suffers fatal work-related injury in Denver, CO

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, August 9, in Denver, CO

Improving TSCA: The job’s not done yet and new rules are key to protecting public health

While the Lautenberg Chemical Safety Act for the 21st Century was signed into law with considerable fanfare, the job of improving U.S. chemicals policy in is far from complete. During two EPA stakeholder meetings this month, we heard a familiar script fom the chemical industry.

Cherry-picked workplace injury statistics hides the toll of injuries, illness and deaths in California

A closer look at the latest available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that injury and illness stats for California show the state has worse, not better, rates of worker injuries and illnesses than national levels or the performance of other major industrial states. Show More Summary

Occupational Health News Roundup

Farmworkers in south Texas continue to struggle 50 years after historic worker strike; Illinois governor signs Domestic Workers Bill of Rights; Samsung Electronics accused of withholding deadly chemical exposure information from workers; and OSHA fines a Tyson chicken plant after a worker loses a finger.

Yearbooks on US Occupational Health and Safety, 2012 – 2016

Beginning on Labor Day 2012, we have published a yearbook on U.S. occupational health and safety. Here are the links to each year’s report: Yearbook 2012 Yearbook 2013 Yearbook 2014 Yearbook 2015

Whopping exaggeration by coal industry about black lung regulations

The coal industry made wild claims about its inability to comply with a proposed MSHA regulation to protect miners from developing black lung disease. Two years after the rules took affect, we see the magnitude of the industry's exaggeration.

Death on water slide at Schlitterbahn follows worker death

When I heard the news about the 10 year old who died on Sunday at the Schlitterbahn water park in Kansas City, I couldn’t help but remember Nico Benavides, 20. Benavides died in March 2013 while a lifeguard at Schlitterbahn’s park on San Padre Island, TX. Benavides and a co-worker were assigned to do maintenance on the…

Multiple chronic conditions and Medicaid expansions

A new study in MMWR reports that 25.7% of US adults have been diagnosed with multiple chronic conditions. Three of the states with the highest prevalence of multiple chronic conditions haven't accepted the Medicaid expansion, and one that expanded Medicaid may drop it.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Slate investigates a little-used Fair Labor Standards Act provision that could improve conditions for farmworkers; Syrian child refugees face exploitation in Turkey's textile industry; OSHA cites a Wisconsin shipyard for exposing workers to high levels of lead; and researchers offer new insights into the effects of Seattle's $15 minimum wage law.

Medical malpractice at Pilgrim’s Pride…the poultry company?

It sounds like malpractice to me. That’s what I’ve been thinking ever since learning how the injuries sustained by poultry workers are treated (and not treated) at the company nursing stations.

The more researchers look for colistin-resistant bacteria, the more they find

A gene that makes bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic colistin, mcr-1, has been found in 32 countries, and has been in the US since at least May 2015. Researchers in Belgium and Italy have additional alarming discoveries on related genes.

Florida reports first locally transmitted Zika cases; advocates push Congress to act on funding

This morning, the Florida Department of Health reported a “high likelihood” of the first localized transmission of Zika virus from mosquito to person in the United States.

Fatal work injury that killed Kevin Purpura, 39, was preventable, OSHA cites Woda Construction and Sandow Development

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Kevin Purpura, 39, could have been prevented had Woda Construction Inc. and Sandow Development followed worker safety regulations.

New survey finds many Americans are open to discussing gun safety with their doctors

Every year in the U.S., more than 32,000 people die due to gun-related violence, suicide and accidents. That number includes the deaths of seven children and teens every day. So it’s not surprising that health care providers — those who witness the tragic results of gun violence — are often vocal proponents of gun safety reform. Show More Summary

Worth reading: Racism, fighting epidemics, and environmental justice in Cleveland

Recent pieces address racism, stress, and mortality; an interview with CDC Director Tom Frieden on Zika; why mocking environmental justice in Cleveland is especially inappropriate; and more.

Not an “accident”: Timothy Dubberly, 58, suffers fatal work-related injury in Fernandina Beach, FL

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, July 16, in Fernandina Beach, FL.

Convenience store operators snub crime-prevention ordinances

Dallas and Houston have city ordinances in place to reduce the risk of violence perpetrated against convenience store clerks. NIOSH researchers found that few establishments comply with the law.

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