Blog Profile / The Pump Handle


URL :http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/
Filed Under:Health / Epidemiology
Posts on Regator:273
Posts / Week:0.7
Archived Since:November 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Achoo!!  No paid sick leave for 91% of Arkansas poultry workers

On the day that Arkansas-based Tyson Foods announced $461 million in quarterly profits, a survey of Arkansas poultry workers found 91% did not have paid sick leave.

States that invest more in social services and public health have lower rates of HIV/AIDS

For public health workers, it’s no surprise that social, economic and political conditions shape the distribution and burden of disease. They’ve always known that it takes much more than medicine to keep people healthy. Still, when public...Show More Summary

Not an “accident”: Harold Felton, 36, suffers fatal work-related injury in Seattle, WA

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Tuesday, February 26 in Seattle, WA.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Federal laws fail to protect workers left out of state workers' comp systems; electronics recycling workers and their families face dangerous lead poisoning risks; California farmworkers join forces with low-wage food service workers for better pay; and a worker who died during preparations for the Super Bowl is remembered.

More evidence that high-deductible health plans don’t lead to smarter shopping

Economists have suggested that people with traditional insurance coverage over-consume healthcare because each doctor visit or lab test requires a relatively low co-payment. If we paid more for each service – had “skin in the game” – the thinking goes, we’d be more judicious about the healthcare we consume and shop around for the best value. Show More Summary

Study: Higher gun ownership rates up the risk of a woman being murdered

In the midst of another national debate over gun safety regulations, some argue that higher rates of gun ownership will protect people from dangerous strangers with deadly intentions. Physician and public health researcher Michael Siegel set out to study that argument. Show More Summary

Researchers link high exposure to air pollution to increased risk of premature birth

Each year, the U.S. spends $26.2 billion on costs associated with preterm birth — that’s birth before 37 weeks of pregnancy. Beyond the costs, babies born too early experience immediate and long-term problems, from developmental disabilities to asthma to hearing loss. Show More Summary

Amputations abound at Tyson Foods, OSHA records give me a peek under the shades of industrial food production

OSHA now requires employers to report when a work-related amputation occurs. In the first nine months under the new regulation, how many amputations did one of the country's largest food manufacturers report to OSHA?

Appeals Court rejects coal industry complaints, upholds health protections for miners

In a decision issued yesterday, the US Court of Appeals rejected the National Mining Association's legal challenge to a Labor Department regulation to better protect coal miners from developing black lung disease.

The spread and toll of Zika

Zika virus has been linked to thousands of cases of microcephaly (infants born with abnormally small brains and heads) and is spreading throughout the Americas.

Study: Nearly half of U.S. counties now home to ticks that transmit Lyme disease

It’s been nearly two decades since the last publication of a nationwide survey on the distribution of blacklegged ticks — the primary transmitters of Lyme disease. That survey, released in 1998, reported the tick in 30 percent of U.S. counties. Today, a new study using similar surveillance methods has found the tick in more than 45 percent of counties.

Not an “accident”: Kevin Purpura, 39, suffers fatal work-related injury in Wheeling, WV

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Wednesday, January 15 in Wheeling, WV.

Worth reading: Zika and mutated genes

Recent stories address the Zika virus, which is linked to babies born with small heads; a reporter with advanced cancer covering the assisted-suicide movement; and more.

Occupational Health News Roundup

The Center for Investigative Reporting exposes discriminatory hiring practices within the temporary staffing industry; a worker dies in another chemical facility explosion in Houston; a new Amnesty International report links tech giants to child labor; and Amazon is cited for failing to report workplace injuries.

Study: Lessons from a successful lockout/tagout intervention could save a worker’s life

Think about all the objects you use every day that are made with pieces of metal. Before that object got to you, a worker in the metal manufacturing industry used a machine to cut, saw, bend and assemble the metal pieces into the countless products that make our lives easier. Show More Summary

Tale of two cities: public transit drivers and bathroom breaks

The transit authorities in Washington DC and Houston TX have different attitudes and approaches to address bus drivers' needs to use access toilets during their workshifts. If I was a bus driver, I'd want a program like Houston's.

Not an “accident”: Justin ‘J.D.’ Jorgensen, 30, suffers fatal work-related injury in Altoona, Iowa

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Wednesday, January 6 in Altoona, IA.

Study: Night shift workers face dangerous risks on the drive home

Scientists are finding that night shift work comes with a range of particular health risks, from heart disease to diabetes to breast cancer. This month, another study joined the pack — this one on the risk of traffic crashes among those who head home from work at sunrise.

Congress (finally) allows use of federal funds for needle exchanges

The omnibus spending bill includes a measure that allows the use of federal funds for state and local needle-exchange program -- and it was championed by Kentucky Republicans.

New CDC data on opioid abuse: ‘The opioid overdose epidemic is worsening’

These days, there’s a lot of attention on finding new and creative ways to turn around the nation’s opioid abuse and overdose problem. And it’s attention that’s very much needed because the problem is only getting worse.

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