Blog Profile / The Pump Handle


URL :http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/
Filed Under:Health / Epidemiology
Posts on Regator:471
Posts / Week:1.1
Archived Since:November 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

CDC: Health care workers report highest rates of asthma

More than 2 million U.S. adults may be living with workplace-related asthma, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Free on-line course on “decent work in global supply chains” offered by the Global Labour University

A free, two-month course on global supply chains is being offered on-line by the Global Labour University starting on January 12, 2017. The course is being taught in English by Penn State University Professor Mark Anner, one the leading labor-oriented researchers on the global economy.

EPA beats Congress’ deadline, names first 10 chemicals for action under new law

EPA met its first major milestone under the new chemical safety law passed by Congress this past June. It announced its list for the first 10 chemicals for which it will prepare risk evaluations. Those evaluations could lead to restrictions on use or phase-outs of chemicals that presents an unreasonable risk to humans and the environment.

Even after the Rana Plaza disaster it is hard to get international clothing brands to do the right thing

A new report by four leading workers’ rights group shows just how hard it is to get international clothing brands to fix problems in their global supply chains despite the fact that 1,100 workers were killed in an instant in an unsafe...Show More Summary

Study: U.S. still lags behind on health care affordability and access

The percentage of Americans who reported cost-related barriers to health care dropped from 37 percent in 2013 to 33 percent in 2016 — a change that directly corresponds to insurance expansions under the Affordable Care Act, a new study reports. On the flip side, Americans are still more likely than peers in other high-income nations to face financial obstacles to health care.

Teen birth rates drop nationwide, but more slowly in rural counties

New data from CDC's National Center for Health Statistics show that the US teen birth rate dropped substantially between 2007 and 2015, but it has declined most slowly in rural areas.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Advocates sound off on whether worker safety will survive under Trump; an intimate interview with a waitress highlights inconsistent income and sexual harassment; a court blocks Obama's overtime rule from taking effect; and United Food and Commercial Workers pushes for health and safety training for California's marijuana workers.

An era of racism and xenophobia

Polling data and early appointment decisions suggest we're looking at worsening racism and xenophobia in the US.

Butterball turkey plant: an “injury-free” workplace yet plenty of walking wounded

Writing for Slate, Gabriel Thompson spent time in northwest Arkansas investigating working conditions in a Butterball turkey plant. You would be wise to disregard the poultry industry's claims about record-low injury rates.

Florida’s Stand Your Ground law led to sharp increase in homicides

In 2005, Florida legislators passed the nation’s first “Stand Your Ground” law, expanding legal immunity for residents to use lethal force when they believe they’re being threatened. A decade later, a new study finds that Florida has experienced a significant increase in homicides, while states without such laws have not.

Two reports profile low-wages, grim conditions for workers in the food industry

Oxfam's "Women on the Line" and the Food Chain Workers' Alliance's "No Piece of the Pie" provide more evidence of the low wages, harsh conditions, and disrespect experienced by millions of workers in the U.S. food industry.

Study: Depression increasing among American teens, young adults

More and more of America’s adolescents and young adults are struggling with depression, especially young women, according to a study released earlier this week.

A Tribute to Steve Wing

by Jill Johnston Steve and I were driving down a long stretch of two lane highway in eastern North Carolina. The six-hour round-trip journey happened frequently so Steve could visit residents most impacted by the industrial hog industry. Today, we were visiting a family concerned about their water quality and recent results they received from…

A reminder that advocates for health and justice are ready to fight

Three days out from the election and many of us are still trying to adjust to this new reality. It’s been a very rough week.

Haiti sees surge in cholera cases after Hurricane Matthew; UN admits moral responsibility

Months after a severe earthquake devastated Haiti in 2010, UN peacekeeping troops exacerbated Haitians’ suffering by introducing cholera to the island. After Hurricane Matthew, cholera cases are surging again, and the UN admits it has a moral responsibility to address the situation.

Johns Hopkins faces class-action lawsuit for defrauding miners with black lung disease

The families of two coal miners are charging that Johns Hopkins University's Black Lung Program with intent to defraud hundreds of workers from federally earned benefits for work-related disabling lung disease. Appropriate for today's holiday, both men were U.S. veterans.

Honduran women’s and labor rights organization wins APHA Occupational Health and Safety Section’s International Award

The Honduras Independent Monitoring Team (EMIH) won the 2016 International Award of the Occupational Health and Safety Section of the American Public Health Association at the APHA’s annual conference in Denver.  Lynda Yanz, Executive Director of the Maquila Solidarity Network, based in Toronto, Canada, accepted the award on behalf of EMIH at the November 1st awards luncheon. 

Occupational Health News Roundup

Hispanic hotel workers in Las Vegas are becoming a powerful political force; families of miners who died from black lung disease sue Johns Hopkins Hospital; Milwaukee officials approve a living wage ordinance for county workers; and women in France and Iceland walk off the job to protest the gender wage gap.

“Hazards of the gig economy” – Temp workers at greater risk for workplace injury but poorly protected, say labor advocates

During the week when OSHA renewed its alliance with the American Staffing Association, National COSH held a press call to draw attention to the temp industry’s failure to adequately address health and safety problems faced by temp workers.

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