Blog Profile / The Pump Handle


URL :http://scienceblogs.com/thepumphandle/
Filed Under:Health / Epidemiology
Posts on Regator:366
Posts / Week:0.9
Archived Since:November 9, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Hospital lab technicians’ breast cancer deemed work-related

Canada's Supreme Court ruled on June 24 that breast cancer can be considered work-related under the country’s workers’ compensation law. Three women who were employed as lab technicians at a hospital in British Columbia argued that the hormone-mimicking chemicals in their workplace was a factor in developing breast cancer.

Study: Higher minimum wages tied to better infant health and survival

A couple months ago, we reported on a study that found raising the minimum wage to $15 could have prevented thousands of premature deaths in New York City alone. Now comes more science on the life-saving benefits of higher wages — this one found that just a modest increase in the minimum wage could have saved the lives of hundreds of babies. Show More Summary

Puzzling OSHA regulatory agenda for last 6 months of Obama term

OSHA added five new topics to its regulatory agenda despite being tardy completing its current rulemaking activities. Reading the agenda brings several questions to mind.

Obama calls out asbestos at TSCA signing ceremony

President Obama called out asbestos as the key example of why the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act is needed. He signed it into law today.

Occupational Health News Roundup

An in-depth look at how lobbyists squashed an Illinois bill to prevent discriminatory hiring practices in the temp industry; thousands of coal miners in Kentucky rally to save their health benefits and pensions; Chicago gets closer to a sick leave ordinance; and two workers lose their lives in the Bakken oil fields in the span of a few days.

Study finds success in scaling up hospitals’ infection prevention efforts

Researchers report encouraging initial results from a program designed to reduce cathether-associated urinary tract infections at hospitals nationwide.

The Donald ignorant on public health, too: Asbestos widow schools Trump about the “magic mineral”

Donald Trump is ignorant about many things and we can add asbestos to the list. Linda Reinstein's husband died too young from cancer caused by asbestos. She schools Trump about exposure to the deadly mineral.

Bringing the anti-asbestos movement into the future: A conversation with two young worker safety advocates

The road toward eliminating the threat of asbestos has been long, slow-moving, incredibly frustrating and littered with significant hurdles. Thankfully, advocates like Linda Reinstein, who lost her husband to asbestos-related disease in 2003, refuse to get discouraged.

Fatal work injury that killed Kenneth Schultz was preventable, Cal-OSHA cites Labor Ready

The fatal work-related injuries that killed Kenneth Schultz could have been prevented had his employer followed worker safety regulations.

Worth reading: Inaction in the face of mass shootings and fixing a broken mental health system

Recent pieces address inaction in the face of mass shootings, insufficient funds for fighting Zika, proposals to fix a broken mental health system, and more.

Study: Prescription drug monitoring programs lead to less opioid prescribing

In 2014, more than 28,000 people in the U.S. died from an opioid overdose. That same year, more Americans died from drug overdoses than during any other year on record, with the escalating numbers fueled by opioid abuse. Solutions to...Show More Summary

Shrugging shoulders, holding noses on passage of TSCA reform bill

Many environmental, health and consumer groups are shrugging their shoulders about the TSCA reform bill headed to President Obama's desk for his signature. Their reaction---the silence---is striking.

Coal miner, newly retired, but not as miners’ safety rep

Flip Wilson retired months ago after 40 years as a coal miner. Co-workers designated him as their safety representative. He drives 70 miles roundtrip to accompany mine inspectors and ensure the company is following the law.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Reveal investigates the toll of nuclear testing on the country's "atomic vets"; federal labor officials propose new mining safety rules; D.C. officials vote in support of a $15 minimum wage; and an Amazon employee writes a first-person account from inside one of the company's warehouses.

Study documents links between sexual trauma, suicide among veterans

In the first large-scale study of its kind, researchers report that sexual trauma is indeed a risk factor for suicide among military veterans and are calling on veteran health providers to continue including such trauma in suicide prevention strategies.

Not an “accident”: Agrey Emile Coudakpo, 32, suffers fatal work-related injury in Jessup, MD

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on Friday, May 27, in Jessup, MD.

US researchers find bacteria resistant to last-resort drug

MCR-1, the easily transferable gene that makes bacteria resistant to last-resort antibiotic colistin, has been found in bacteria from a Pennsylvania woman and in a sample from a pig intestine.

More good news from the ACA: Big gains in the state with the most uninsured

Everything’s bigger in Texas — including the number of Texans without health insurance. But thanks to the Affordable Care Act, the percentage of uninsured Texas residents has dropped by 30 percent. That means the Texas uninsured rate has hit its lowest point in nearly two decades.

State, local public health loses critical funding because Congress fails to act on Zika: ‘Yes, we should be scared’

“In my darker hours when I’m sleeping at night, that’s where I go.” Those are words from Eric Blank, senior director for public health systems at the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), talking about the enormous difficulties that public health labs faced in keeping up with the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic. Show More Summary

Yellow fever, Zika virus, and lessons we have to keep learning

Federal investment in controlling infectious diseases has saved lives and averted economic losses in the past. But without sustained support for public health and preparedness, we’ll remain at risk.

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