Blog Profile / RealClimate


URL :http://www.realclimate.org/
Filed Under:Issues & Causes / Climate Change
Posts on Regator:360
Posts / Week:0.9
Archived Since:November 10, 2008

Blog Post Archive

The Soon fallacy

As many will have read, there were a number of press reports (NYT, Guardian, InsideClimate) about the non-disclosure of Willie Soon’s corporate funding (from Southern Company (an energy utility), Koch Industries, etc.) when publishing results in journals that require such disclosures. There are certainly some interesting questions to be asked (by the OIG!) about adherence […]

The mystery of the offset chronologies: Tree rings and the volcanic record of the 1st millennium

Guest commentary by Jonny McAneney Volcanism can have an important impact on climate. When a large volcano erupts it can inject vast amounts of dust and sulphur compounds into the stratosphere, where they alter the radiation balance. While the suspended dust can temporarily block sunlight, the dominant effect in volcanic forcing is the sulphur, which […]

Noise on the Telegraph

I was surprised by the shrill headlines from a British newspaper with the old fashioned name the Telegraph: “The fiddling with temperature data is the biggest science scandal ever”. So what is this all about? The story makes serious allegations, however Victor Venema explains why the Telegraph got it wrong in Variable Variability, and makes […]

Thoughts on 2014 and ongoing temperature trends

Last Friday, NASA GISS and NOAA NCDC had a press conference and jointly announced the end-of-year analysis for the 2014 global surface temperature anomaly which, in both analyses, came out top. As you may have noticed, this got much more press attention than their joint announcement in 2013 (which wasn’t a record year). In press […]

A new sea level curve

The “zoo” of global sea level curves calculated from tide gauge data has grown – tomorrow a new reconstruction of our US colleagues around Carling Hay from Harvard University will appear in Nature. That is a good opportunity for an overview over the available data curves. The differences are really in the details, the […]

Unforced Variations: Jan 2015

This month’s open thread. Sorry for the slow start – you know what it’s like after the holidays…

Diagnosing Causes of Sea Level Rise

Guest post by Sarah G. Purkey and Gregory C. Johnson University of Washington / NOAA I solicited this post from colleagues at the University of Washington. I found their paper particularly interesting because it gets at the question of sea level rise from a combination of ocean altimetry and density (temperature + salinity) data. This […]

Absolute temperatures and relative anomalies

Most of the images showing the transient changes in global mean temperatures (GMT) over the 20th Century and projections out to the 21st C, show temperature anomalies. An anomaly is the change in temperature relative to a baseline which usually the pre-industrial period, or a more recent climatology (1951-1980, or 1980-1999 etc.). With very few […]

Clarity on Antarctic sea ice.

I’ve always been a skeptic when it comes to Antarctic sea ice. I’m not referring here to the tiresome (and incorrect) claim that the expansion of sea ice around Antarctica somehow cancels out the dramatic losses of sea ice in the Arctic (NB: polar bears don’t really care if there is sea ice in Antarctica […]

AGU 2014

Once more unto the breach! Fall AGU this year will be (as last year) …the largest Earth Science conference on the planet, and is where you will get previews of new science results, get a sense of what other experts think about current topics, and indulge in the more social side of being a scientist. […]

Ten Years of RealClimate: Where now?

The landscape for science blogging, the public discourse on climate and our own roles in the scientific community have all changed radically over the last 10 years. Blogging is no longer something that stands apart from professional communications, the mainstream media or new online start-ups. The diversity of voices online has also increased widely: scientists […]

Ten years of Realclimate: By the numbers

Start date: 10 December 2004 Number of posts: 914 Number of comments: ~172,000 Number of comments with inline responses: 14,277 Minimum number of total unique page visits, and unique views, respectively: 19 Million, 35 Million Number of guest posts: 100+ Number of mentions in newspaper sources indexed by LexisNexis: 225 Minimum number of contributors and […]

Ten years of RealClimate: Thanks

As well as the current core team – David Archer, Eric Steig, Gavin Schmidt, Mike Mann, Rasmus Benestad, Ray Bradley, Ray Pierrehumbert, Stefan Rahmstorf – this blog has had input from many others over the years: The 90+ guest contributors who bring a necessary diversity of experience and expertise to the blog: Abby Swann, Alan […]

Ten Years of RealClimate

In the spring of 2004, when we (individually) first started talking to people about starting a blog on climate science, almost everyone thought it was a great idea, but very few thought it was something they should get involved in. Today, scientists communicating on social media is far more commonplace. On the occasion of our […]

The most popular deceptive climate graph

The “World Climate Widget” from Tony Watts’ blog is probably the most popular deceptive image among climate “skeptics”.  We’ll take it under the microscope and show what it would look like when done properly. So called “climate skeptics” deploy an arsenal of misleading graphics, with which the human influence on the climate can be down […]

Recent global warming trends: significant or paused or what?

As the World Meteorological Organisation WMO has just announced that “The year 2014 is on track to be the warmest, or one of the warmest years on record”, it is timely to have a look at recent global temperature changes. I’m going to use Kevin Cowtan’s nice interactive temperature plotting and trend calculation tool to […]

Unforced variations: Dec 2014

This month’s open thread. Think history, Lima, and upcoming additions of a single data point to timeseries based on arbitrary calendrical boundaries.

A clearer picture how climate change affects El Niño?

I still remember the first time I was asked about how climate change affects El Niño. It was given as a group exercise during a winter school in Les Houghes (in France) back in February 1996. Since then, I have kept thinking about this question, and I have not been the only one wondering about […]

Unforced variations: Nov 2014

This month’s open thread. In honour of today’s New York Marathon, we are expecting the fastest of you to read and digest the final IPCC Synthesis report in sub-3 hours. For those who didn’t keep up with the IPCC training regime, the Summary for Policy Makers provides a more accessible target. Also in the news, […]

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