Blog Profile / RealClimate


URL :http://www.realclimate.org/
Filed Under:Issues & Causes / Climate Change
Posts on Regator:371
Posts / Week:0.9
Archived Since:November 10, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Nenana Ice Classic 2015

Unsurprisingly to anyone looking at the exceptionally warm winter on the West Coast of North America, the Nenana Ice Classic had another near-record early breakup on Friday, netting some lucky winner(s) around $300,000 in prizes. As I’ve discussed previously (last year and an update), the Ice Classic is a lottery that has been run every […]

The return of the iris effect?

Guest commentary from Andy Dessler (TAMU) When a new scientific hypothesis is published, two questions always occur to me: Did the authors convincingly show the hypothesis was correct? If not, is the hypothesis actually correct? The answers to these two questions may not be the same. A good example is Wegener’s theory of continental drift […]

An Online University Course on the Science of Climate Science Denial

Guest post from John Cook, University of Queensland For many years, RealClimate has been educating the public about climate science. The value of climate scientists patiently explaining the science and rebutting misinformation directly with the public cannot be overestimated. When I began investigating this issue, my initial searches led me here, which was invaluable in […]

A Scientific Debate

Guest posting from Bill Ruddiman, University of Virginia Recently I’ve read claims that some scientists are opposed to AGW but won’t speak out because they fear censure from a nearly monolithic community intent on imposing a mainstream view. Yet my last 10 years of personal experience refute this claim. This story began late in 2003 […]

Unforced Variations: April 2015

April already? Time for a new climate science open thread…

Reflections on Ringberg

Constraining climate sensitivity turns out to depend on subtle non-linearities and cloud feedbacks.

A hypothesis about the cold winter in eastern North America

The past winter was globally the warmest on record. At the same time it set a new cold record in the subpolar North Atlantic – and it was very cold in the eastern parts of North America. Are these things related? Two weeks ago NOAA published the following map of temperature anomalies for the past […]

What’s going on in the North Atlantic?

The North Atlantic between Newfoundland and Ireland is practically the only region of the world that has defied global warming and even cooled. Last winter there even was the coldest on record – while globally it was the hottest on record. Our recent study (Rahmstorf et al. 2015) attributes this to a weakening of the […]

Climate Sensitivity Week

Some of you will be aware that there is a workshop on Climate Sensitivity this week at Schloss Ringberg in southern Germany. The topics to be covered include how sensitivity is defined (and whether it is even meaningful (Spoiler, yes it is)), what it means, how it can be constrained, what the different flavours signify […]

Severe Tropical Cyclone Pam and Climate Change

Guest post by Kerry Emanuel In the past 16 months, two exceptionally intense tropical cyclones, Haiyan and Pam, have struck the western Pacific with devastating effect. Haiyan may have had the highest wind speeds of any tropical cyclone on record, but we will never know for sure because we do a poor job estimating the […]

Unforced variations: March 2015

This month’s open thread. We’ve burned out on mitigation topics (again), so please focus on climate science issues this month…

The Soon fallacy

As many will have read, there were a number of press reports (NYT, Guardian, InsideClimate) about the non-disclosure of Willie Soon’s corporate funding (from Southern Company (an energy utility), Koch Industries, etc.) when publishing results in journals that require such disclosures. There are certainly some interesting questions to be asked (by the OIG!) about adherence […]

The mystery of the offset chronologies: Tree rings and the volcanic record of the 1st millennium

Guest commentary by Jonny McAneney Volcanism can have an important impact on climate. When a large volcano erupts it can inject vast amounts of dust and sulphur compounds into the stratosphere, where they alter the radiation balance. While the suspended dust can temporarily block sunlight, the dominant effect in volcanic forcing is the sulphur, which […]

Noise on the Telegraph

I was surprised by the shrill headlines from a British newspaper with the old fashioned name the Telegraph: “The fiddling with temperature data is the biggest science scandal ever”. So what is this all about? The story makes serious allegations, however Victor Venema explains why the Telegraph got it wrong in Variable Variability, and makes […]

Thoughts on 2014 and ongoing temperature trends

Last Friday, NASA GISS and NOAA NCDC had a press conference and jointly announced the end-of-year analysis for the 2014 global surface temperature anomaly which, in both analyses, came out top. As you may have noticed, this got much more press attention than their joint announcement in 2013 (which wasn’t a record year). In press […]

A new sea level curve

The “zoo” of global sea level curves calculated from tide gauge data has grown – tomorrow a new reconstruction of our US colleagues around Carling Hay from Harvard University will appear in Nature. That is a good opportunity for an overview over the available data curves. The differences are really in the details, the […]

Unforced Variations: Jan 2015

This month’s open thread. Sorry for the slow start – you know what it’s like after the holidays…

Diagnosing Causes of Sea Level Rise

Guest post by Sarah G. Purkey and Gregory C. Johnson University of Washington / NOAA I solicited this post from colleagues at the University of Washington. I found their paper particularly interesting because it gets at the question of sea level rise from a combination of ocean altimetry and density (temperature + salinity) data. This […]

Absolute temperatures and relative anomalies

Most of the images showing the transient changes in global mean temperatures (GMT) over the 20th Century and projections out to the 21st C, show temperature anomalies. An anomaly is the change in temperature relative to a baseline which usually the pre-industrial period, or a more recent climatology (1951-1980, or 1980-1999 etc.). With very few […]

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