Blog Profile / RealClimate

Filed Under:Issues & Causes / Climate Change
Posts on Regator:306
Posts / Week:0.8
Archived Since:November 10, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Going with the wind

A new paper in Nature Climate Change out this week by England and others joins a number of other recent papers seeking to understand the climate dynamics that have led to the so-called “slowdown” in global warming. As we and others have pointed out previously (e.g. here), the fact that global average temperatures can deviate [...]

Unforced variations: Feb 2014

A little late starting this month’s open thread – must be the weather…

Exploring CRUTEM4 with Google Earth

Guest commentary by Tim Osborn and Phil Jones The Climatic Research Unit (CRU) land surface air temperature data set, CRUTEM4, can now be explored using Google Earth. Access is via this portal together with instructions for using it (though it is quite intuitive). We have published a short paper in Earth System Science Data to [...]

New climate science MOOCs

Along with David’s online class a number of new climate science MOOCs are now coming online. A new online course from MIT, “Global Warming Science”, introduces the basic science underpinning our knowledge of the climate system, how climate has changed in the past, and how it may change in the future. The course focuses on [...]

Global temperature 2013

The global temperature data for 2013 are now published. 2010 and 2005 remain the warmest years since records began in the 19th Century. 1998 ranks third in two records, and in the analysis of Cowtan & Way, which interpolates the data-poor region in the Arctic with a better method, 2013 is warmer than 1998 (even [...]

If You See Something, Say Something

Gavin provided a thoughtful commentary about the role of scientists as advocates in his RealClimate piece a few weeks ago. I have weighed in with my own views on the matter in my op-ed today in this Sunday’s New York Times. And, as with Gavin, my own views have been greatly influenced and shaped by [...]

Thames Barrier raised again

Back in 2007 I wrote a post looking at the closures of the Thames Barrier since construction finished in 1983. Since then there has been another 7 years of data and given that there was a spate of closures last week due to both river and tidal flooding, it seems a good time to revisit [...]

A Bit More Sensitive…

by Michael E. Mann and Gavin Schmidt This time last year we gave an overview of what different methods of assessing climate sensitivity were giving in the most recent analyses. We discussed the three general methods that can be used: The first is to focus on a time in the past when the climate was [...]

Unforced Variations: Jan 2014

First open thread of the new year. A time for ‘best of’s of climate science last year and previews for the this year perhaps? We will have an assessment of the updates to annual indices and model/data comparisons later in the month.

AGU talk on science and advocacy

We have often discussed issues related to science communication on this site, and the comment threads frequently return to the issue of advocacy, the role of scientists and the notion of responsibility. Some videos from the recent AGU meeting are starting to be uploaded to the AGU Youtube channel and, oddly, the first video of [...]

The global temperature jigsaw

Since 1998 the global temperature has risen more slowly than before. Given the many explanations for colder temperatures discussed in the media and scientific literature (La Niña, heat uptake of the oceans, arctic data gap, etc.) one could jokingly ask why no new ice age is here yet. This fails to recognize, however, that the [...]

AGU 2013 preview and participation

So, it’s that time of year again. Fall AGU is the largest Earth Science conference on the planet, and is where you will get previews of new science results, get a sense of what other experts think about current topics, and indulge in the more social side of being a scientist. The full scientific program [...]

A failure in communicating the impact of new findings

I was disappointed by the recent summary for policymakers (SPM) of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC) assessment report 5, now that I finally got around to read it. Not so much because of the science, but because the way it presented the science. The report was written by top scientists, so what went [...]

Unforced Variations: Dec 2013

This month’s open thread. It’s coming to the end of the year and that means updates to the annual time series of observations and models relatively soon. Suggestions for what you’d like to see assessed are welcome… or any other climate science related topic.

Arctic and American Methane in Context

Lots of interesting methane papers this week. In Nature Geoscience, have published a substantial new study of the methane cycle on the Siberian continental margin of the Arctic Ocean. This paper will get a lot of attention, because it follows by a few months a paper from last summer,, which claimed a strong (and [...]

Sea-level rise: What the experts expect

In the long run, sea-level rise will be one of the most serious consequences of global warming. But how fast will sea levels rise? Model simulations are still associated with considerable uncertainty – too complex and varied are the processes that contribute to the increase. A just-published survey of 90 sea-level experts from 18 countries [...]

Statistics and Climate

Do different climate models give different results? And if so, why? The answer to these questions will increase our understanding of the climate models, and potentially the physical phenomena and processes present in the climate system. We now have many different climate models, many different methods, and get a range of different results. They provide [...]

Global Warming Since 1997 Underestimated by Half

A new study by British and Canadian researchers shows that the global temperature rise of the past 15 years has been greatly underestimated. The reason is the data gaps in the weather station network, especially in the Arctic. If you fill these data gaps using satellite measurements, the warming trend is more than doubled in [...]

Simple physics and climate

No doubt, our climate system is complex and messy. Still, we can sometimes make some inferences about it based on well-known physical principles. Indeed, the beauty of physics is that a complex systems can be reduced into simple terms that can be quantified, and the essential aspects understood. A recent paper by provides an example [...]

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