Blog Profile / A Walk in the Words

Filed Under:Academics / Linguistics
Posts on Regator:453
Posts / Week:1.3
Archived Since:December 8, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Five of the Best Hotels in Whistler

Smack dab in the middle of two awe-inspiring mountains lies the resort village of Whistler. When you take a stroll down its pedestrian-only walkway, you can’t help but feel the energy and excitement in the air. The mountains, Whistler and Blackcomb, are well-known for their incredible skiing and snowboarding, but the village has much to offer too. Show More Summary

Cities Less Traveled: Beat a New Path in Chicago

If you are the type of person who delights in discovering the not-so-well-known attractions in a city, you might be surprised to know that Chicago, with all of its famous attractions, actually has several frequently overlooked attractions. Show More Summary

Tips on Staying and Playing in Chicago on the Cheap

A trip to Chicago will provide you with joyous and heartwarming memories to last a lifetime. No matter what time of year you go, there is always something special about the city. During the winter holidays, the magical, twinkling lights and colorful, festive displays are truly something to behold. Show More Summary

Chicago has Razzmatazz and More

It doesn't have to be a pipe dream; you can enjoy the razzmatazz Chicago has to offer and be on cloud nine.Believe it or not, three of the words in the previous sentence were created in Chicago, and Chicago has contributed many words to the English language. Show More Summary

Traveling Dialects

“I’m so New Orleans, when I go out of town people ask me if I’m Canadian.” A joke, right? No, it seems that, contrary to all expectations, a certain Canadian pronunciation is beginning to emerge in the Big Easy. This is an excerpt from an interesting Lingua Franca piece by Allan Metcalf. Check out O Canada! in New Orleans to read the rest.

Travel Language

There is an interesting post on Language Log about the following image.

Travel Articles

I have added a page titled "Travel Articles" where I will soon be sharing some exciting exciting posts for the Hipmunk City Love Project. Please be sure to check back soon.


"The face of a child can say it all. Especially the mouth part of the face." - Jack Handey

No Interruptions, Please

Hilarious. I cam across this video while doing research for a reading class I am teaching.

I want to pass you and URNDWAY

While the contradiction itself is humorous, this photo also would have been a perfect photo to go with last Friday's post. Image via 22 Words.


My first thought upon seeing this plate from a distance was, "underway, cute and appropriate." As I got closer, I noticed I had mixed up the order of the letters initially. When I realized what it was intended to say, I had a good laugh. Show More Summary

A Variation on a Homonym

It's not a homonym; it is a drawmonym. From one of my favorite cartoonists, John Atkinson at Wrong Hands. A visual homonym: drawings that look the same but have different meanings.

The Heron Ate the Herring

Where did the red herring go? The red heron wasn't distracted by it; I believe the red heron ate it. The substitution of red heron for red herring is called an eggcorn. I came across this eggcorn in the wild yesterday on the geocaching...Show More Summary

Astounded, Shocked, Astonished, Confounded and Stupefied

That is how I felt when I learned that a Yahoo survey found one of the top ten most searched terms for 18- to 35-year-olds is: What is a synonym? Survey info via The Week magazine, September 13, 2013 Image credit:

Subway's Poor Portmanteau Choice

Am I the only one who has a problem with the name of Subway's new menu item? There are just too many options for the phonetic realization of the neologism. To start with, where are the syllable breaks? Is it fla/ti/za or flat/iz/a? Which...Show More Summary

SpecGram Essential Guide to Linguistics - A Book Review

No... Click here. I recently had the excruciating pleasure of reading an advance copy of The Speculative Grammarian's Essential Guide to Linguistics. For the rare few who are unfamiliar with Speculative Grammarian, it is, and I quote,...Show More Summary

Retronymic Tea

A retronym is a term consisting of a noun and a modifier which specifies the original meaning of the noun. Examples include: black and white television, acoustic guitar, cloth diaper, and bar soap.

Semantic Choices

Pick one or the other. A recent Wrong Hands comic that I enjoyed.

Stinky Portmanteaus

A semantically spot-on portmanteau - Spotted on If Companies Had Realistic Slogans at BuzzFeed.

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