Blog Profile / Symmetry Breaking


URL :http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/breaking/
Filed Under:Academics / Physics
Posts on Regator:1108
Posts / Week:2.5
Archived Since:December 20, 2008

Blog Post Archive

2016 year in particle physics

Scientists furthered studies of the Higgs boson, neutrinos, dark matter, dark energy and cosmic inflation and continued the search for undiscovered particles, forces and principles. Working together, particle physicists from the US and...Show More Summary

The ABCs of Particle Physics board book

The ABCs of Particle Physics is currently available at public libraries and stores near Fermilab and SLAC. For lovers of rhymes and anthropomorphic Higgs bosons, Symmetry presents its first published board book, The ABCs of Particle Physics. Show More Summary

Physics books of 2016

As 2016 comes to a close, Symmetry writer Mike Perricone takes us through the latest additions to his collection of popular science books related to particle physics. The year 2016 brought us books on topics such as gravitational waves, the...Show More Summary

Science with sprinkles

Holiday guests will gravitate toward these physics cookies. Want your holiday cookies to stand out this year among the usual snowflakes and Santa Clauses? Show your smarts with these scientific cookie decorations. Gravitational waveShow More Summary

SESAME to open in 2017

The first synchrotron radiation source in the Middle East is running tests before its planned 2017 start. Scientists and engineers at the first synchrotron radiation source in the Middle East have begun commissioning, a major milestone...Show More Summary

A syllabus in cosmic rays

What have scientists learned in five years of studying cosmic rays with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment? On May 19, 2011, astronauts used a remote-controlled robotic arm to attach a nearly 17,000-pound payload to the side of the International Space Station. Show More Summary

Deep learning takes on physics

Can the same type of technology Facebook uses to recognize faces also recognize particles? When you upload a photo of one of your friends to Facebook, you set into motion a complex behind-the-scenes process. An algorithm whirs away, analyzing the pixels in the photo until it spits out your friend’s name. Show More Summary

Viewing our turbulent universe

Construction has begun for the CTA, a discovery machine that will study the highest energy objects and events across the entire sky. Billions of light-years away, a supermassive black hole is spewing high-energy radiation, launching it far outside of the confines of its galaxy. Show More Summary

Hacking for humanity

THE Port humanitarian hackathon at CERN brings people from multiple industries together to make the world a better place. In October, scientists, humanitarian workers and people across various industries came together at CERN for an annual hackathon to develop solutions to some of today’s pressing humanitarian issues. Show More Summary

Q&A: What more can we learn about the Higgs?

Four physicists discuss Higgs boson research since the discovery. More than two decades before the discovery of the Higgs boson, four theoretical physicists wrote a comprehensive handbook called The Higgs Hunter’s Guide. The authors—Sally Dawson of the Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory; John F. Show More Summary

What to do with the data?

Physicists and scientific computing experts prepare for an onslaught of petabytes. Rapid advances in computing constantly translate into new technologies in our everyday lives. The same is true for high-energy physics. The field hasShow More Summary

The origins of dark matter

Theorists think dark matter was forged in the hot aftermath of the Big Bang. Transitions are everywhere we look. Water freezes, melts, or boils; chemical bonds break and form to make new substances out of different arrangements of atoms.  The universe itself went through major transitions in early times. Show More Summary

Is there a dark energy particle?

A theoretical particle that adapts to its surroundings could explain the accelerating expansion of our universe. Our universe grows a little bigger every day. Empty space is expanding, sweeping galaxies further and further apart. Even...Show More Summary

#AskSymmetry Twitter chat with Leonardo Senatore

See theorist Leonardo Senatore’s answers to readers’ questions about parallel universes. [View the story "#AskSymmetry Twitter Chat with Leonardo Senatore 10/31/16" on Storify]

In search of a parallel universe

What are parallel universes, and why do we think they might exist? Theoretical physicist Leonardo Senatore from the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology explains. Video of 7CIWKnbxNZM Have a burning question aboutShow More Summary

A bright idea

Can a biochemistry technique win the battle against background for scientists studying the nature of neutrinos? While we read, think, move or just perceive the world around us, thousands of neurons fire in our brain. Ions, like little messengers, jump from neuron to neuron and create a cascade of information transfer. Show More Summary

A primer on gravitational-wave detectors

Physicists are searching for gravitational waves all across the spectrum. Gravitational waves, or ripples in the fabric of space-time, have captured the imagination of physicists since Albert Einstein first predicted them in 1916. But...Show More Summary

99 percent invisible

With a small side project, astronomers discover a new type of galaxy. In 2011, astronomers Pieter van Dokkum and Roberto “Bob” Abraham found themselves in a restaurant in Toronto nursing something of a mid-life crisis. Abraham, a professor...Show More Summary

It came from the physics lab

Settle in for a physics-themed Halloween movie marathon. Looking for a way to celebrate Halloween? Has 2016 got you too spooked to go outside? Pop some corn and sample Symmetry’s little-known series of physics horror films instead. (Actual...Show More Summary

Citizen scientists join search for gravitational waves

A new project pairs volunteers and machine learning to sort through data from LIGO. Barbara Téglás was looking to try something different while on a break from her biotechnology work. So she joined Zooniverse, a website dedicated toShow More Summary

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