Discover a new way to find and share stories you'll love… Learn about Reading Desk

Blog Profile / Symmetry Breaking


URL :http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/breaking/
Filed Under:Academics / Physics
Posts on Regator:1278
Posts / Week:4
Archived Since:December 20, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Jokes for nerds

Webcomic artist Zach Weinersmith fuels ‘Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal’ with grad student humor and almost half of a physics degree. Zach Weinersmith, creator of popular webcomic “Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal,” doesn’t know all...Show More Summary

Q&A: Katherine Freese

The new director of the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics talks neutrinos, women in science, and the hunt for dark matter. Katherine Freese admits she didn’t do well in her first college physics course, but her impressive resume...Show More Summary

‘CERN People’ series tells it like it is

A new video series about scientists at CERN pulls back the curtain on what it’s like to be a physicist during a pivotal time in the field. American director and documentary film maker Liz Mermin has traveled from beauty schools in Afghanistan to Bollywood movie sets in India filming people at their work. Show More Summary

Science Hack Day

Astrophysicists inspire space-related projects at a 24-hour hack-a-thon in San Francisco. As the space flick Gravity plays on large monitors in the open office space of a San Francisco tech company, nearly 175 people fight off sleepShow More Summary

500-mile neutrino experiment up and running

Construction is complete for NOvA, the longest-distance neutrino experiment in the world. It’s the most powerful accelerator-based neutrino experiment ever built in the United States, and the longest-distance one in the world. It’s called...Show More Summary

To catch a gravitational wave

Advanced LIGO, designed to detect gravitational waves, will eventually be 1000 times more powerful than its predecessor. Thirty years ago, a professor and a student with access to a radiotelescope in Puerto Rico made the first discovery...Show More Summary

Daya Bay places new limit on sterile neutrinos

The Daya Bay experiment, famous for studying neutrino mixing, is branching into a new area of neutrino physics. The experiment that produced the latest big discovery about ghostly particles called neutrinos is trying its hand at solving...Show More Summary

Accelerating the fight against cancer

As charged-particle therapies grow in popularity, physicists are working with other experts to make them smaller, cheaper and more effective—and more available to cancer patients in the United States. Once physicists started accelerating...Show More Summary

CERN turns 60

CERN celebrates six decades of peaceful collaboration for science. Today, CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is blowing out 60 candles at an event attended by official delegations from 35 countries. Founded in 1954,...Show More Summary

CERN gets new Guinness World Records title

The global authority on superlatives celebrates a tiny particle found in a massive machine. The Higgs boson now holds a seat next to “world’s longest tongue” and “most swords swallowed underwater.” The latest version of the GuinnessShow More Summary

When research worlds collide

Particle physicists and scientists from other disciplines are finding ways to help one another answer critical questions. When particle physics and other fields of science meet, interesting things happen. Cosmic rays are put to use studying cloud formation. Show More Summary

Cosmic dust proves prevalent

Space dust accounts for at least some of the possible signal of cosmic inflation the BICEP2 experiment announced in March. How much remains to be seen. Space is full of dust, according to a new analysis from the European Space Agency’s...Show More Summary

Pursuit of dark matter progresses at AMS

A possible sign of dark matter will eventually become clear, according to promising signs from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment. New results from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment show that a possible sign of dark matter is within scientists’ reach. Dark matter is a form of matter that neither emits nor absorbs light. Show More Summary

XKCD creator answers ‘What if?’

Randall Munroe, author of the webcomic xkcd, has found another outlet for his inquisitive nature. Relentless curiosity is the driving force behind Internet phenomenon Randall Munroe’s new book, What If? Serious Scientific Answers ToShow More Summary

Science gets social

If you like your science with a cup of coffee, a pint of beer or a raucous crowd, these events may be for you. With an explosion of informal science events popping up around the world, it’s easier than ever to find ways to connect with...Show More Summary

Sci-fi writers, scientists imagine the future

A new project pairs science fiction authors with scientists to envision worlds that are both inspiring and achievable. A few years ago, structural engineering professor Keith Hjelmstad received an unusual phone call. On the line was Neal Stephenson, author of futuristic thrillers such as Snow Crash and Cryptonomicon. Show More Summary

Astrophysics at the edge of the Earth

Conducting research at the South Pole takes a unique level of commitment. The sun sets but once a year at the South Pole, and it is a prolonged process. During a recent stay at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, postdoctoral researcher Jason Gallicchio saw it hover along the horizon for about a week before dropping out of sight for six months. Show More Summary

What Hawking really meant

Fermilab physicist Don Lincoln explains the idea of a metastable universe, what it has to do with the Higgs boson, and why we're still in good shape. If you’re a science enthusiast, this week you have likely encountered headlines claiming...Show More Summary

True tales of science

When two theoretical physicists crossed paths at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in New York, the Story Collider was born. When storyteller Margot Leitman asked students at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in New York to describe...Show More Summary

Forecasting the future

Physicists and other scientists use the GEANT4 toolkit to identify problems before they occur. Physicists can tell the future—or at least foresee multiple possible versions of it. They do this through computer simulations. Simulations...Show More Summary

Copyright © 2011 Regator, LLC