Blog Profile / Illicit Cultural Property


URL :http://illicit-cultural-property.blogspot.com/
Filed Under:Arts
Posts on Regator:464
Posts / Week:1.3
Archived Since:January 18, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Bonneau on nonrepresentational art

Sonya G. Bonneau, a Professor of Legal Research and Writing at Georgetown, has posted a working paper: “Ex Post Modernism: How the First Amendment Framed Nonrepresentational Art” to SSRN. Here’s the abstract: Nonrepresentational art repeatedly surfaces in legal discourse as an example of highly valued First Amendment speech. Show More Summary

Marion True Resurfaces

Geoff Edgers managed to snag an interview with Marion True, former curator of antiquities at the Getty Museum, and the subject of an antiquities-trafficking trial in Rome. A trial that even Paolo Ferri admits was only to “show an example of what Italy could do.” I don’t imagine many will change their view of True […]

Metal Detecting Permits up in Greece

Nick Romeo reports for National Geographic that the economic downturn in Greece may be leading to a spike in looting of ancient sites. Apparently there has been an increase in the applications for permits to use metal detectors: As the Greek economic crisis has intensified over the past five years, police detectives with the Greek […]

Chechi on human rights and restitution

Alessandro Chechi, a post-doctoral researcher at the Art-Law Centre in Geneva has published a thoughtful discussion on human rights and restitution. From the abstract: The legal and political discourse over cultural heritage is today dominated by a number of sophisticated conceptions. First, the term cultural heritage is used to focus attention on the manifestations that […]

John Henry Merryman and Art Law

I’m sad to relay the news that John Henry Merryman passed away on August 3. He was 95. No single individual did more to establish the field of art law, and I’m not sure any work on art or cultural heritage law can be written without accounting for his groundbreaking scholarship. He will certainly be […]

Picasso Work Seized in Corsica

French customs officials seized this work by Pablo Picasso from a yacht off the coast of Corsica. It was reportedly about to be flown to Switzerland on a private jet. Henry Samuel reported for the Telegraph that:   The work Picasso painted in 1906 and valued at “more than €25 million” is the property of […]

Cultural Heritage Conservation Easements

Jessica Owley of SUNY Buffalo has posted a piece examining the use of conservation easements in the context of Cultural Heritage Protection. From the abstract: Conservation easements are quickly becoming a favored tool for protection of cultural heritage. Perpetual encumbrances on the use of private land, most cultural heritage conservation easements are held by private […]

Profile of Syrian Preservation Group

“A human life doesn’t have much value without culture to go with it” says Markus Hilgert, director of the Pergamon Museum. He’s interviewed in a CNN profile of Heritage for Peace, a group working to document the destruction taking place there. The group walks a delicate line, trying not to take a stand in the […]

A Polke Painting Discovered in Thrift Shop?

A thrift store called The Guild Shop in Houston may have sold an original work by Sigmar Polke in May. It had been sitting in the shop for 100 days until Ray Riley bought the work for $90. On bringing the work home discovered the letters “S Polke” written on a corner of the frame. […]

Roodt and Benson on Databases for Stolen Art

  Christa Roodt, of the University of Glasgow and the University of South Africa, and Bernadine Benson, of the University of South Africa have an article in the June issue of the South Africa Crime Quarterly examining databases for stolen art with a particular emphasis on the South African position post-Apartheid. They make a good […]

The lack of options to combat heritage loss in Syria

In remarks marking the opening of the 39th session of the World Heritage Committee in Bonn, Germany yesterday, UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova asked for help from the international community: Heritage is under attack today. In Syria, Iraq, Libya and Yemen, we see the brutal and deliberate destruction of heritage on an unprecedented scale. This is […]

UK Pledges to Ratify 1954 Hague Convention (again)

The UK seems poised to ratify the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. The Convention responded to the horrible theft and destruction which took place during World War II. The UK Government has at various points in the past indicated ratification of the Convention was imminent, including in […]

Palmyra as Propaganda Success

“We must try... to remain calm”. So says Stefan Weber, Director of the Museum of Islamic Art in Berlin in an interview with Sönje Storm of DW. The entire interview is well worth a read, but of particular note are his comments on how we can prepare for the time after the armed conflict […]

Richard Prince’s Appropriation Isn’t New

The terrific daily JSTOR points out that Richard Prince and his appropriation of Instagram photos is nothing new, in fact some argued his ideas weren’t even new 25 years ago: Prince’s artistic practice has always been challenged by critics, though likewise his very forthright practice and process challenges viewers, gallerists, art patrons, and the public at large to […]

5Pointz Suit Continues

The legal battle over 5Pointz has entered a new phase this week, as a complaint by some of the artists whose works were destroyed when the building was whitewashed has been filed in Federal Court. Though this may seem to be a new suit or new proceeding, it really should be viewed as a continuation […]

Bauer on the Implications of the Destruction in Syria and Iraq

Alexander Bauer, Chief Editor of the International Journal of Cultural Property has written an editorial arguing the destruction in Iraq and Syria though tragic also allows new approaches which can move beyond the old entrenched cultural property arguments. From the introduction: In the dozen years I have edited the IJCP, I have chosen not to […]

25 Objects Returned to Italy, 0 Arrests

    In a ceremony this week officials from the United States and Italy announced the return of 25 looted objects to Italy. The various press releases from the U.S. and Italian authorities have details on all the returns. But I want to highlight one object which fascinates:this 6th-century BC Kalpis, likely looted from near […]

Student Note on Underwater Heritage in the Dominican Republic

Lydia Barbash-Riley, a student and Editor-in-Chief of the Indiana Jouranal of Global Legal Studies has an interesting piece examining the impact of globalization on underwater cultural heritage management in the Dominican Republic: This Note addresses the management of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (UCH) in the Dominican Republic as a case study of the effects of […]

Rome Convention: 20 Years after the UNIDROIT Convention

I’m very much looking forward to participating in this Friday’s conference at the Capitoline Museum in Rome marking the 20th Anniversary of the UNIDROIT Convention on Stolen and Illegally Exported Cultural Property. If you haven’t registered yet, and happen to be in Rome, I’m afraid registration is closed. But I’ll be offering some thoughts on the […]

Opposing Papers on Numismatic Law

I happened on two opposing viewpoints on the import restrictions on ancient coins in my inbox this afternoon. The first, written by Nathan Elkins, critiques from an archaeological perspective the test case brought by the Ancient Coin Collectors Guild. The case attempted to challenge the breadth of import restrictions against the import of ancient coins, “Ancient […]

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