Blog Profile / Illicit Cultural Property

Filed Under:Arts
Posts on Regator:479
Posts / Week:1.3
Archived Since:January 18, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Muddling Artist’s Moral Rights

The National Historic Preservation Act has come to the rescue of this mural from 1976, which is badly in need of conservation. But in the process a federal court has muddled the Moral Rights of Artists moving forward. The mural on the Prado Dam near Corona, California was painted by High School students from Corona … Continue reading Muddling Artist’s Moral Rights

Colbert on naughty parts in art

Stephen Colbert has fun with art and network censors:

Legal Questions over the acquisitions by the Museum of the Bible were inevitable

Steve Green has amassed 40,000 objects since 2009 for his Museum of the Bible. His name may be familiar, he’s President of Hobby Lobby (and one of the major funders of a successful Supreme Court challenge which allows employers to opt out of paying for insurance on religious grounds, which pays for some health care). Show More Summary

On that funerary statue seized in the UK

Janet Ulph has given a helpful overview of the seizure by UK Customs of this funerary statue. The statue was seized after Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs said the statue was “misdeclared”. It was declared as a statue from Turkey, with an estimated value of $110,000. Show More Summary

Leaked records hint at how much ISIS makes on antiquities

On Monday, on the blog Jihadology, we got some fresh insight into how ISIS makes its money. They have a short-term financial strategy that relies primarily on seizures and confiscations they classify as taxes. Relatively little comes even from oil revenues, and an even smaller amount comes from the sale of antiquities. Show More Summary

Buccafusco on Copyright authorship

Christopher Buccafusco, a Professor at Cardozo Law School has posted on SSRN a draft of his work forthcoming in the Virginia Law Review titled “Copyright Authorship”. From the abstract: The U.S. Constitution gives Congress the powerShow More Summary

The ICC has dramatically increased the profile of heritage crime

The International Criminal Court may be on the verge of dramatically increasing the profile of cultural heritage crimes. Perhaps even ushering in a new era of thinking about international criminal law’s role in the destruction of cultural heritage. Show More Summary

Special Heritage issue of Near Eastern Archaeology

The Journal of Near Eastern Archaeology has a special issue covering the “Cultural Heritage in the Middle East”. There are ten contributions covering Iraq, Syria, Egypt, Libya, and Afghanistan. All of the contributions are available on JSTOR. Show More Summary

Student Note on the Scythian Gold from Crimea

Maria Nudelman in a student note for the Fordham International Law Journal discusses “Who Owns the Scythian Gold? The Legal and Moral Implications of Ukraine and Crimea’s Cultural Dispute”. From the introduction: The current political...Show More Summary

The Menil and the Lysi Frescoes

I’ve posted on SSRN a short paper discussing the Menil Foundation’s stewardship of the Lysi Frescoes. Given how much art is in jeopardy in the middle-East at the moment, it may be worth revisiting the Menil Foundation’s courageous decision to purchase, restore, and return these frescoes. Show More Summary

CBS report: Antiquities Smuggling from Syria to Istanbul

CBS News has some terrific first-hand reporting of antiquities smuggling from Apamea to Istanbul in this video report. Nothing here comes as much of a surprise sadly, but it confirms what we all suspect has been happening. A Roman mosaic,...Show More Summary

Registration Open for DePaul’s Cultural Heritage Law Competition

Applications are now open for the terrific Cultural Heritage Moot Court competition. This is a very well-run competition, and a lot of fun every year: DePaul University College of Law and the Lawyers’ Committee for Cultural HeritageShow More Summary

Newshour updates the bad antiquities news from Palmyra

It includes interviews with Archaeologist Michael Danti, and Agent Brenton Easter from ICE:

Vadi on Global Cultural Governance

Valentina Vadi, a reader in Law at Lancaster University has published an article in the Boston University International Law Journal titled “Global Cultural Governance by the Investment Arbitral Tribunals: The Making of a Lex Administrativa Culturalis“. Show More Summary

Op-Ed: Syria will need its culture

In yesterday’s Houston Chronicle, I argued that Museums and arts patrons need to follow the example of the Menil Foundation and offer safe harbor for works of art: Addressing the Islamic State’s destruction of the temple of Baal Shamin...Show More Summary

Bonneau on nonrepresentational art

Sonya G. Bonneau, a Professor of Legal Research and Writing at Georgetown, has posted a working paper: “Ex Post Modernism: How the First Amendment Framed Nonrepresentational Art” to SSRN. Here’s the abstract: Nonrepresentational art repeatedly surfaces in legal discourse as an example of highly valued First Amendment speech. Show More Summary

Marion True Resurfaces

Geoff Edgers managed to snag an interview with Marion True, former curator of antiquities at the Getty Museum, and the subject of an antiquities-trafficking trial in Rome. A trial that even Paolo Ferri admits was only to “show an example of what Italy could do.” I don’t imagine many will change their view of True […]

Metal Detecting Permits up in Greece

Nick Romeo reports for National Geographic that the economic downturn in Greece may be leading to a spike in looting of ancient sites. Apparently there has been an increase in the applications for permits to use metal detectors: As the Greek economic crisis has intensified over the past five years, police detectives with the Greek […]

Chechi on human rights and restitution

Alessandro Chechi, a post-doctoral researcher at the Art-Law Centre in Geneva has published a thoughtful discussion on human rights and restitution. From the abstract: The legal and political discourse over cultural heritage is today dominated by a number of sophisticated conceptions. First, the term cultural heritage is used to focus attention on the manifestations that […]

John Henry Merryman and Art Law

I’m sad to relay the news that John Henry Merryman passed away on August 3. He was 95. No single individual did more to establish the field of art law, and I’m not sure any work on art or cultural heritage law can be written without accounting for his groundbreaking scholarship. He will certainly be […]

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