Blog Profile / Brain Blogger


URL :http://brainblogger.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Neuroscience
Posts on Regator:946
Posts / Week:2.4
Archived Since:January 19, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Does Moderate Alcohol Consumption Improve Brain Function?

It is well documented that excessive consumption of alcohol is linked to various serious health problems. Heavy drinking is a known risk factor for diseases such as cardiovascular problems, some types of cancer, cirrhosis, dementia,Show More Summary

Is Being Clever Dangerous For Your Health?

The idea that how smart you are might be connected with how healthy you are is not new. Those who studied social sciences have probably seen the published works on the subject dating back to 1980s. The problem is not so easy to study academically, though. It is hard to separate the influence of various […]

Huntington’s Disease – A High-Tech Solution?

Huntington’s disease is a genetic disorder that causes the progressive death of brain’s nerve cells. This gradually results in to the loss of functional abilities and ultimately causes severe movement and cognitive impairments. The disease often strikes during a person’s prime working years and to date, there is no known cure. However, new developments in […]

Link Between Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

Rates of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are rising worldwide, and research on the subject, particularly risk factors and correlation with cognitive impairment and decline are among the most important and applicable. Among those, data suggests that diet seems to be the most important risk factor to target. For instance, is a very well-known fact that when […]

Best and Worst of Psychology and Psychiatry – July 2016

It’s a meta-analysis month again. Meta-analysis, when approached rigorously, can provide much more confidence in research findings by combining and analysing data from multiple studies. This month I will report more than the standard...Show More Summary

Best and Worst of Neuroscience and Neurology – July 2016

Hundreds of articles published this month further advanced our knowledge of neuroscience. Lots of new discoveries published in July relate to some of the most fundamental processes in the brain that shape our daily life, as well as to the practical problems doctors have to deal with on a regular basis. The selection of articles […]

The Empirical, Direct Route to One’s Own Mind

I came across a thought-provoking opinion piece written by Alex Rosenberg in The New York Times July 18, 2016 edition of The Stone, entitled Why You Don’t Know Your Own Mind. The Stone is a series moderated by philosopher Simon Critchley for the use of contemporary thinkers in various cognitive and social science to present […]

Stress Shortens Life

In today’s increasingly high-paced world, stress has become part and parcel of our lives. It is well-known that chronic stress and depression are detrimental to our well-being and we are often able to tell its physical manifestation in a loved one or close friend. Can we take that one step further and claim that stress […]

Can Technology Change How Our Brain Works?

Smartphones and other electronic devices have changed the way we communicate and the way we interact with the world. But to what extent can technology change us? Most importantly, can it change our brain? When neurons communicate with each other they generate brain waves. These are the result of the synchronized rhythmic activity of thousands […]

Hallucinations vs Delusions – What’s the Difference?

Delusions are a symptom of some mental disorder, such as schizophrenia, delusional disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophreniform disorder. Hallucinations, on the other hand, tend to only appear in people with schizophrenia or a psychotic disorder. Show More Summary

Mindfulness for Children May Prevent Anxiety and Mental Illness

Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric conditions for children and teens. While antidepressants are frequently used to treat youth with anxiety disorders, sometimes, antidepressants may be poorly tolerated in children who are at high risk of developing bipolar disorder. A new study by researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) explores how cognitive […]

Diabetes-Associated Cognitive Impairment – Not Just For the Elderly

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is on the rise; it can actually be regarded as an epidemic propagating as a consequence of poor lifestyle choices – bad feeding habits and sedentarism. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) estimates that there are over 380 million cases of diabetes throughout the world and predict that it may […]

Education Linked to Brain Tumor Risk

Education and socioeconomic status have been linked with cancer outcomes, but a new study now links higher education with the development of certain types of cancer. The large observational study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, reports that a high level of education is associated with an increased risk of brain tumors. […]

Stop Procrastinating Before You Even Start using Emotional Control

For readers looking to jump into the deep end of understanding procrastination, I highly recommend the recent volume edited by James Gross, Handbook of Emotion Regulation. This collection of chapters provides the most current and thorough review of the research literature in the area. Because I have put such emphasis in my own writing on […]

Complaining and the Brain – How “Bad Karma” Is Created

It is intuitive that a negative attitude and constant complaining are bad for us – but can it really affect our brain? It turns out that there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that negativity can alter our perception of life by changing the connection of the neurons in our brain. This would then […]

Cannabinoids Hold Promise for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition and the most common form of dementia worldwide, accounting for around 70% of dementia cases. Deposition of the amyloid-beta (A-beta) peptide in the form of amyloid plaques is one of the hallmarks of the disease, occurring early in the development of this condition. As disease progresses, degenerative changes […]

Nurturing The Brain – Part 10, Ketogenic Diets

Fasting has been used as a form of therapy for epilepsy throughout the history of medicine. But in 1921, Dr Woodyatt at Rush Medical College in Chicago observed that that there were a couple of ketone molecules that appeared in the blood of subjects undergoing starvation or low-carbohydrate/high-fat content diets, while Dr Wilder at the […]

How Does The Brain Organize Memories Across Time?

Research on the organization of our memory has long been a topic of fascination among neuroscientists given that this could lead to treatments for reversing cognitive impairments. Here, we review some recent findings on how memory is organized which show the importance of a coordinated “wave” of neuronal activity in spatial navigation, and the temporal […]

An Ecological Model for Dysfunction

In previous essays, I’ve discussed a way to look at mental disorders, not as discrete medical entities, but as attempts to describe types or patterns of psychosocial problems. I’ve called these dysfunctions that can be placed on dimensions of dysfunction. Dimensions have no breaks between normal and abnormal, between sane and mentally ill; only more […]

Best and Worst in Health and Healthcare – June 2016

In June, the beneficial effects of exercise were on the spotlight again, along with a few potentially effective new therapies. On the down side, there were a number of studies highlighting the negative side-effects of commonly used drugs. Here is the best and worst news of June. THE BEST Consensus on the effect of physical […]

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