Blog Profile / Brain Blogger

Filed Under:Academics / Neuroscience
Posts on Regator:968
Posts / Week:2.4
Archived Since:January 19, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Scholarship for College Students Living with a Neurological Disorder

Bella Soul is a charity that empowers college students faced with chronic illness, physical disabilities, and disease through scholarships and emotional support. I have partnered with them to serve on and advise their scholarship committee on a voluntary basis. Their First Annual Luke G. Neurological Scholarship will award $500 to $1,000 to full-time students enrolled […]

Can Our Immune System Drive Social Behavior?

The immune system is our main defense mechanism against disease. Dysfunctions in the immune system are therefore associated with a myriad of complications, including several neurological and mental disorders. Yet, for a long time the brain and the immune system were considered to be isolated from each other – it was believed that the brain […]

Artificial Light and Circadian Rhythm – Are We Messing It Up?

The day-night cycle is one of the most defining patterns of life as we know it. We live in a cyclic environment and circadian rhythms are an essential element in the biology of living organisms. Many physiological processes are synchronized with the day-night cycle, being modulated by environmental timing cues such as sunlight. Our biological […]

Can Stroke be Prevented By Lifestyle Changes?

Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability. But can stroke be prevented? Probably not totally, but it sure is possible to drastically reduce the odds of having a stroke. A huge international study on the risk factors for stroke recently published in The Lancet has shown that the majority are potentially modifiable behaviors. […]

Money Cant Buy Child Health Without Parent Affection

Growing up in a well-off home can benefit a child’s physical health even decades later, but a lack of parent-child warmth, or the presence of abuse, may eliminate the health advantage of a privileged background, according to a Baylor University study. Assistant professor of sociology at Baylor University, Matthew A. Andersson, Ph.D., explains: Previous research […]

Projection – When Narcissists Turn the Blame on You

Ah, projection. The fine art of making me guilty of your vices. Projection No one projects better or more frequently than a narcissist. They’ve practiced, honed and refined projection to a fine art. Whatever they’re up to, by some mental “abracadabra,” suddenly they’re innocent and you’re actually the one up to no-good. Deep In The […]

Best Strategy to Manage Stress Depends on the Person

People use different coping strategies to deal with stressful events, and some people use coping strategies more than others. Three techniques for keeping perspective through the ups and downs of life that have been studied are: Mindfulness: Staying aware in the present moment Reappraisal: Finding ways of reinterpreting negative events to give them more positive […]

Happy Family Linked with Leisure Time at Home

Family fun often means new activities and destinations but a new study suggests leisure time spent at home in familiar pastimes may be a better route to happiness. The lead author of a newly published study in the World Leisure Journal, Dr. Karen K. Melton, assistant professor of child and family studies at Baylor University […]

Challenging Goal? Improve Focus by Engaging Your Brain

New research confirms anecdotal observations that people can easily be distracted if they want to be, and that the ability to concentrate on a task and stay disciplined is best accomplished when an individual is interested. Investigators say their findings provide evidence that one’s motivation is just as important for sustained attention to a task […]

New Target in Brain for Treating Depression — The BMP Pathway

A significant number of patients do not respond to antidepressant drugs, and some even feel worse, a somber fact that emphasizes the urgent need to find other treatment options. In a new study on mice, scientists at Northwestern Medicine have discovered a pathway in the brain that may be a promising new drug target for […]

New Game-like Technology Helps Assess Concussions

In August, the FDA approved two medical devices that can assess cognitive function immediately after a suspected brain injury or concussion. These tests are the first of their kind that the FDA has allowed to be marketed. The tests – Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) and ImPACT Pediatric – are the first devices […]

Diabetes Drug for Addiction Treatment

A relatively new class of drugs, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, have had much success in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Now, these drugs may offer support in the treatment of addiction and drug abuse. A new study, published in Translational Psychiatry, reports that GLP-1 receptors may be a target for treating drug abuse. […]

“I’ll Do It Later” – Brain Connectivity Predicts Procrastination

Procrastination — we are all guilty of it. Irrationally delaying a task in day-to-day life can have minor effects, such as lost sleep from staying up late to meet a deadline, but it can also be detrimental. From a health perspective, waiting to go to the doctor until an illness becomes severe could be fatal. […]

Best and Worst of Neuroscience and Neurology – August 2016

This article summarizes some interesting publications that came out in August. As usual, there were many interesting developments, both in fundamental neuroscience and neurology, and in practical aspects of dealing with and treating brain-related diseases and disorders. Show More Summary

Best and Worst in Health and Healthcare – July & August 2016

The northern hemisphere’s summer is ending and that is definitely bad news. The good news is that this was not a silly season in health and healthcare research. Here’s the best and worst news of the summer. The best Drug repurposing screening reveals possible candidates for anti-Zika therapy Developing a new drug is a long […]

How to Deal with Destination Memory Issues – Did I already tell you?

Have you ever realized or been informed that the person you are talking to has already heard the joke or story you are telling? I already told your this? If you have been in this situation, you are not alone. You are dealing with what experts call, destination memory. Destination memory is the ability to […]

9/11 Survivors – Prolonged Mental and Physical Health Problems

Emerging research discovers significant health problems continue to affect people exposed to hazards 15 years after the terror attacks of 9/11 and the collapse of the World Trade Center towers. Dr. Steven Stellman, a professor of epidemiology at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health is co-author of four new studies through the World Trade Center […]

Best and Worst in Psychology and Psychiatry – August 2016

Every month we scour the 1000s of new research publications in psychology and psychiatry for trending and field progressing findings. Making the top five best findings this month include the influence our bank balance has on our mental state, and how our mental state can also help empty our bank balance. The worst findings, the […]

Happy Retirement – 5 Ways to Prolong the Golden Years

After a lifetime of hard work, thousands of baby boomers are retiring in record numbers across the globe. Like any life transition, embarking on the transition from working life to retirement can be wrought with challenges and stressors, especially for those forced into retirement. Yet, it also opens up a window of opportunity to take […]

Can You Improve Physical Skills While Dreaming?

Can we significantly improve physical skills by practicing them while we sleep? Yes, scientists say. New research published in the Journal of Sports Sciences confirms that practicing motor skills while lucid dreaming can lead to real life improvements in skill performance that can be equivalent to practice in waking life. Lucid dreaming is when the […]

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC