Blog Profile / The Millions


URL :http://www.themillionsblog.com/
Filed Under:Entertainment / Books
Posts on Regator:10910
Posts / Week:28.4
Archived Since:February 11, 2009

Blog Post Archive

The Ultimate Intimacy: On Neil Gaiman’s ‘The View from the Cheap Seats’

For Gaiman, the writing memoir is less about how to write and more about why we need writing. The post The Ultimate Intimacy: On Neil Gaiman’s ‘The View from the Cheap Seats’ appeared first on The Millions.

Beyond the Individual Self

Momina Mela writes on the gendered misconceptions about confessional poetry. As she puts it, “In comparison to female confessional poets, male confessional poetry has been regarded with less ridicule as accusations of being merely therapeutic. Show More Summary

The Age-Old Tradition

Scientists are using x-ray to read fragments of 1,300-year-old manuscripts that have been reused as bookbindings. Pair with this Millions essay on private libraries and what books reveal about their readers. The post The Age-Old Tradition appeared first on The Millions.

An Act of Courage

Year in Reading alumnus Alexandre Chee writes about the courage of being queer. As he puts it, “I am sure the 49 patrons who died at Pulse that night didn’t necessarily think of themselves as brave for being there. But they were.” Pair with Claire Cameron’s Millions interview with the author. The post An Act of Courage appeared first on The Millions.

Let’s Not Get It On: The Indefensible Sex Scene

How can you take me there if the word “loins” is used even once? How can you take me there if you won’t admit that there are smells? And pubic hairs that must occasionally be plucked from the tip of your tongue or hocked up discreetly in the shower sometime later. The post Let’s Not Get It On: The Indefensible Sex Scene appeared first on The Millions.

In Today’s Terms

Recommended Reading: On queer terminology and writing queer history. The post In Today’s Terms appeared first on The Millions.

Help Me Choose My Next Beach Read

My beach read should help me forget the roaming packs of half-feral children who will no doubt be kicking sand in my eyes and screeching like wounded monkeys. So I don’t want to read Lord of the Flies or Blood Meridian. The post Help Me Choose My Next Beach Read appeared first on The Millions.

Memoirs of Damage

“I was being paranoid, but those of us who write memoirs should never underestimate the damage they can cause. I’ve seen close relationships rocked by a memoir. I’ve seen parents stop speaking to their children for years. Memoirs pose...Show More Summary

Avoiding Unnecessary Punctuation

Over at The Washington Post, Jeff Guo makes a case against periods. As he puts it, “When we get excited, the pauses between our sentences shrink. We speak in run-ons. […] A period feels too weighty.” Also check out this Millions piece on the benefits of excising quotation marks. The post Avoiding Unnecessary Punctuation appeared first on The Millions.

Allies Respond

Writers John Keene, Dawn Martin Lundy, and others respond to the mass shooting in Orlando. “Homophobia, transphobia, and ideologically-nurtured hatreds of all kinds, coupled with semi-automatic weapons, provide the fuel for terror, in this case literally,” says Keene. The post Allies Respond appeared first on The Millions.

I Will Never Sing Adviser Karaoke at Yearbook Camp

In some ways, yearbook camp felt like an extended Tony Robbins seminar. Each morning we met in the auditorium, where one of the staff led us in a group chant to get us fired-up for the day. I am from New Jersey, and only get fired-up for pizza and pork roll sandwiches. The post I Will Never Sing Adviser Karaoke at Yearbook Camp appeared first on The Millions.

Bibliotherapy for Fiction Lovers

Ceridwen Dovey asks, can reading make you happier? The post Bibliotherapy for Fiction Lovers appeared first on The Millions.

Tuesday New Release Day: Proulx; Gay; Ausubel; Notaro; de Botton; Cline

Out this week: Barkskins by Annie Proulx; Hunger by Year in Reading alumna Roxane Gay; Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty by Ramona Ausubel; I’m Just a Person by Tig Notaro; The Course of Love by Alain de Botton;  and The Girls by Emma Cline (which we reviewed). Show More Summary

Like It or Love It?

Recommended Reading: A very long (and informative) piece on Tom Vanderbilt’s new book, You May Also Like, and why people enjoy the things they do in the Age of the Internet. The post Like It or Love It? appeared first on The Million...

Prepare for Departure

What’s the best book Mary Roach has read recently? Tim Johnston’s first novel, Descent: “I read the last 30 pages in an airport, 10 feet from the gate, and did not notice the boarding announcements. I missed my flight for literature.”...Show More Summary

Sex, Drugs, and Literary History

Will anyone read Chuck Klosterman in a hundred years? Jonathan Russell Clark explores the possibility over at The Literary Hub: “What fate awaits the author of books so rooted in a given era? Can the accomplishment of capturing now remain...Show More Summary

Maylis de Kerangal: France’s Unlikely Literary Rebel

Maylis de Kerangal is threatening a segment of the French literary establishment — and questioning what it means to be a fiction writer in France. The post Maylis de Kerangal: France’s Unlikely Literary Rebel appeared first on The Millions.

Ramsquaddled and Pixellated

Are you familiar with the term, “clatterdevengeance”? It’s the favorite word of Jonathon Green, purveyor of the internet’s newest dirty slang dictionary, which seeks to document some of the more hilarious (and uncouth) experiments in the English language. The post Ramsquaddled and Pixellated appeared first on The Millions.

The Paper Trail

What writers are actually earning money? Over at Electric Literature, Lincoln Michel takes a look at the new Author Earnings report, which scours Amazon bestseller lists and extrapolates the data to make claims about the state of publishing and self-publishing. Show More Summary

Knowledge Porn: On Helen DeWitt’s ‘The Last Samurai’

When Ludo takes his magnificent brain to public school for the first time, and discovers the exquisite agony of being misunderstood by a world of simpletons, I feel like Helen DeWitt “gets” me. The post Knowledge Porn: On Helen DeWitt’s ‘The Last Samurai’ appeared first on The Millions.

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC