Blog Profile / The Millions


URL :http://www.themillionsblog.com/
Filed Under:Entertainment / Books
Posts on Regator:11980
Posts / Week:28.3
Archived Since:February 11, 2009

Blog Post Archive

The Cruelest Joke: Laughing Through Tragedy

It’s cathartic to hear David Cross rip Donald Trump to shreds. Just as it’s cathartic to listen to Louis C.K. make fun of himself. Just as it’s cathartic to escape in Mitch Hedberg jokes instead of thinking about the sick person I just spoke to on the phone. Show More Summary

Arrival Is a Movie About Movies (Not Language)

Because the plot of Ted Chiang’s story is so intricately meshed with its medium — the very words that comprise a short story, and the way that we process a linear narrative as we read it off the page — it would be impossible to make a film that engages with language in the same way. The post Arrival Is a Movie About Movies (Not Language) appeared first on The Millions.

Against Readability

“Readable” has become the chosen term of praise in our times precisely because so many of us find ourselves unable to concentrate as we once could or still aspire to. But to praise readability is to embrace the vicious feedback loop that our culture now finds itself in. The post Against Readability appeared first on The Millions.

Tuesday New Release Day: Coetzee; Li; Enriquez; Hoffman; Hogan; Puchner; Shepard

Out this week: The Schooldays of Jesus by J.M. Coetzee; Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life by Yiyun Li; Things We Lost in the Fire by Mariana Enriquez; Running by Cara Hoffman; The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan; Last Day On Earth by Eric Puchner; and The World to Come by Jim Shepard. Show More Summary

Five Ways ‘Homo Deus’ by Yuval Noah Harari Changed My Life

I am an avalanche of electric signals fired by billions of neurons that stimulate glands to secrete hormones and make my muscles contract in such a way that chocolate finds its way to my mouth. The post Five Ways ‘Homo Deus’ by Yuval Noah Harari Changed My Life appeared first on The Millions.

The Transcendent Power of Triangular Fiction

I believe that fiction should work on at least three levels of interpretation: The personal, the conceptual, and the philosophical. In other words, the shape of the core of great works of fiction must be triangular -- it must be emotional, cerebral, and sublime. The post The Transcendent Power of Triangular Fiction appeared first on The Millions.

Heather O’Neill Wants You to Reclaim Your Sense of Wonder: The Millions Interview

Whenever I finish a book, I put it down and the world seems to explode with new meanings. On some level, literature assumes that every reader is a child. The post Heather O’Neill Wants You to Reclaim Your Sense of Wonder: The Millions Interview appeared first on The Millions.

The Fishermen: The Play

A Nottingham-based theatre company will adapt Millions staffer Chigozie Obioma’s Man Booker-shortlisted novel The Fishermen for the stage. The production is scheduled for next year. The post The Fishermen: The Play appeared first on The Millions.

In Sickness and in Health: Mike Scalise and the Illness Narrative

Scalise aligns himself with many other writers of illness narratives who understand that, although their disease may be horrible, it also confers a sense of uniqueness and individuality on the sufferer, at least temporarily. The post In Sickness and in Health: Mike Scalise and the Illness Narrative appeared first on The Millions.

All Lit Up: Finding Style Advice in Classic Literature

My innate interest in beauty was stoked by 20th-century literature and the captivating female characters who populate it. The post All Lit Up: Finding Style Advice in Classic Literature appeared first on The Millions.

Poetry, Jarmusch Style

I was surprised to learn that Paterson’s lines were written, some especially for the film, by the poet Ron Padgett, an award-winning member of the New York School. The post Poetry, Jarmusch Style appeared first on The Millions.

Alana Massey Says Bitches: Be Crazy: The Millions Interview

Men are much more likely to believe sex work is not work. They don't want to believe that it is laborious to engage with them. They believe their beating hearts are fascinating and that they should fascinate whomever they are fascinated by. Show More Summary

NYRB Winter Sale

From now until February 28th, you can grab New York Review of Books Classics titles at a steep discount. The post NYRB Winter Sale appeared first on The Millions.

New Philip Pullman!

His Dark Materials author Philip Pullman has reportedly completed another trilogy, The Book of Dust, that will publish in October of this year. The new works “will stand alongside his bestselling series,” sources say. The post New Philip Pullman! appeared first on The Millions.

Margaret Wise Brown and the Mystery of Mood

Would folks who lulled their children to sleep with Goodnight Moon rest easy if they knew it birthed by a lesbian consciousness? Might they worry that Goodnight Moon could unconsciously shape a mood realm deep inside the child that might make him grow up gay? The post Margaret Wise Brown and the Mystery of Mood appeared first on The Millions.

Women Seen and Heard: A Hollywood Trend Worth Celebrating

To be a woman in a movie, you’re probably straight, and you’re probably white. You’re probably quite thin with great skin and a large wardrobe. Your living space is probably very clean and well decorated. You’re probably smiling. Or laughing. Show More Summary

How to Be Harrowing

Writers like Amy Leach and Rebecca Solnit help me believe that the harrowing essay will not rule the day, and that writing that pays careful attention to the world and to language, tone, and metaphorical resonance can be equally powerful as and far more enduring than the personal essay with the most online shares. The post How to Be Harrowing appeared first on The Millions.

Tuesday New Release Day: Saunders; Erickson; Umansky; Lowe; Rohan; Drabble; Richler

New this week: Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders; Shadowbahn by Steve Erickson; The Fortunate Ones by Ellen Umansky; All That’s Left to Tell by Daniel Lowe; The Weight of Him by Ethel Rohan; The Dark Flood Rises by Margaret Drabble; and Be My Wolff by Emma Richler. Show More Summary

In the Between: “Lincoln in the Bardo”

Reading Lincoln in the Bardo is its own kind of bardo. The post In the Between: “Lincoln in the Bardo” appeared first on The Millions.

Flying Blind: Truth, Journalism, and the Digital Age

Without that truth-seeking ecosystem of healthy small- and mid-size daily newspapers to explain national news in terms local readers can understand, Americans are left stewing in separate echo chambers, one urban, educated, and liberal,...Show More Summary

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