Blog Profile / The Millions


URL :http://www.themillionsblog.com/
Filed Under:Entertainment / Books
Posts on Regator:12465
Posts / Week:27.7
Archived Since:February 11, 2009

Blog Post Archive

The Spaces In-Between: The Millions Interviews Rachel Khong

In that big life story that you tell somebody—that myth that you tell people—you wouldn’t talk about things that just happened quietly every day and yet those things are the very material of that big sweeping story. Those little moments,...Show More Summary

Tuesday New Release Day: Adebayo; MacLaverty; Martin; Salter; Pamuk

Out this week: Stay With Me by Ayobami Adebayo; Midwinter Break by Bernard MacLaverty; Caca Dolce by Chelsea Martin; The Surveyors by Mary Jo Salter; and The Red-Haired Woman by Orhan Pamuk. For more on these and other new titles, go read our most recent book preview. The post Tuesday New Release Day: Adebayo; MacLaverty; Martin; Salter; Pamuk appeared first on The Millions.

Refusing to Look Away: On Leila Guerriero and Joan Didion

We read writers like Guerriero and Didion so we don't forget that looking at people is the most uncomfortable and powerful thing a writer can do. The post Refusing to Look Away: On Leila Guerriero and Joan Didion appeared first on The Millions.

When the Beasts Spoke: Thoreau and the Sound of America

One of the pleasures of Walls’s Thoreau is seeing how Thoreau’s stubborn refusal to lead an ordinary life turned a bright, but otherwise rather ordinary young man into a great and original artist. The post When the Beasts Spoke: Thoreau and the Sound of America appeared first on The Millions.

A Is for Apple

“I want to show you our world as it is now: the door, the floor, the water tap and the sink, the garden chair close to the wall beneath the kitchen window, the sun, the water, the trees.” Apples, plastic bags, teeth  In The Guardian, Karl Ove Knausgaard attempts to explain the world to his […] The post A Is for Apple appeared first on The Millions.

Why Reading

“Unlike, say, skimming a page of headlines, reading a book (of any genre) forces your brain to think critically and make connections from one chapter to another, and to the outside world. When you make connections, so does your brain, literally forging new pathways between regions in all four lobes and both hemispheres. Show More Summary

I Is for Impressive

“It all started with A Is For Alibi, then came B Is For Burglar, C Is For Corpse and on and on through the alphabet.” NPR interviews Sue Grafton about her Kinsey Millhone series, currently spanning 25 letters – the newest and penultimate...Show More Summary

You Will Survive

“You can only advocate for yourself when you know what it is you want from the experience. You’d be surprised by how many people go into this process and are unclear about what they hope to get out of it.” Over at the Amazon Author Insights blog, Katrin Schumann offers a checklist of seven tips to […] The post You Will Survive appeared first on The Millions.

The Greatest Show on Earth

“On January 14, 2017, Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus—America’s oldest and best circus, America’s last true touring circus—announced that it was closing, and six days later the country mourned, with an exit parade, a grand-finale funeral: the inauguration of Donald J. Show More Summary

Kevin Nguyen at It Again

“Blurbs mean nothing. Same with big advances.” GQ editor and Year-in-Reading alum Kevin Nguyen gets the interview treatment from Poets & Writers (and gives a few shout-outs to us while he’s at it!). Among the books he’s read in the last year that stood out: “White Tears by Hari Kunzru by a mile.” The post Kevin Nguyen at It Again appeared first on The Millions.

Total Eclipse

“I turned back to the sun. It was going. The sun was going, and the world was wrong.” Longreads invites us to revisit Annie Dillard‘s classic essay “Total Eclipse,” from her new collection, The Abundance: Narrative Essays Old and New. The post Total Eclipse appeared first on The Millions.

Talk About That

“Here is a fascinating conundrum: The creator of a scientifically delegitimized blueprint of the human mind and of a largely discontinued psychotherapeutic discipline retains the cultural capital of history’s greatest playwright and the erstwhile Son of God.” On Freud. The post Talk About That appeared first on The Millions.

The Waves

Recommended Reading: James Ryerson on a new book about Jean-Paul Sartre and surfing. The post The Waves appeared first on The Millions.

Better Experienced than Explained: On ‘Why Poetry’ by Matthew Zapruder

Poetry is not the only genre that requires resident apologists, but poetry's form and function inherently require defense. Simply put, prose is our default mode. Poetry is a process of selection, of white space and rhythm. If prose is prayer, poetry is hymn. The post Better Experienced than Explained: On ‘Why Poetry’ by Matthew Zapruder appeared first on The Millions.

Major Shelf Envy

The Guardian has photos of A Little Life author Hanya Yanagihara‘s New York City apartment and its 12,000 – yes 12,000 – books. Pair with our interview with her from 2015: “It was the worst—the bleakest, the most physically exhausting, the most emotionally enervating—writing experience I’d had. Show More Summary

Shades of Censorship

“I was absolutely horrified. Wouldn’t have known if not for a Russian reader who read both editions. Publisher in total breach of contract.” The Guardian reports that author VE Schwab was “devastated” to learn scenes from her fantasy series Shades of Magic have been excised from Russian translations for featuring queer characters. Show More Summary

A Story in Parts

“On the way home, the girl did not notice the color of the sky or the shape of the night, as she was too busy questioning why there were no secrets anymore.” As part of its Recommended Reading series, Electric Literature offers a special...Show More Summary

Revising the History of the Art Show Urinal

It wasn’t even the piece that was groundbreaking—it was the narrative pushed to popularize it. Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven was the truer Dadaist, but Duchamp the better marketer. The post Revising the History of the Art Show Urinal appeared first on The Millions.

E-Etymology

“Check it out for yourself to marvel at the the long history of our language, including but not limited to the origins of the term ‘rock snot.’” The AV Club reports that the word nerds at Merriam-Webster have launched Time Traveler, a new tool that lets users look at the timing around when new words entered […] The post E-Etymology appeared first on The Millions.

Rabbit Run

“[C]hildren often prefer the factual over the fantastical. And a growing body of work suggests that when it comes to storybooks, they also learn better from stories that are realistic. For example, preschool-aged children are more likely...Show More Summary

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