Blog Profile / Sociological Images


URL :http://contexts.org/socimages/
Filed Under:Academics / Sociology
Posts on Regator:3177
Posts / Week:7.1
Archived Since:February 15, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Masculinity and Fidelity in Pop Music

Originally posted at the Gender & Society blog. Two songs that seemed like they were on the radio every time I tuned into a pop station last summer were Omi’s single, “Cheerleader” (originally released in 2015) and Andy Grammar’s song, “Honey, I’m good” (originally released in 2014). They’re both songs written for mass consumption. Between […]

Maps of Racial/Ethnic Populations in U.S. Cities

Flashback Friday. Lisa’s colleague, sociologist John Lang, E.W., Rachel, J. Wang, Arturo B., and Larry Harnisch all let us know about Eric Fischer’s set of maps that illustrate racial/ethnic populations in a number of U.S. cities, based on Census 2000 data.They’re great for showing levels of segregation, as well as comparing racial/ethnic diversity and population […]

Visualizing Gender Inequality in a Feminist Bookstore

It’s International Women’s Day–a day to celebrate the social, cultural, economic, and political achievements of women. It’s a day we often take stock of gender inequality, look at how far we’ve come and where we still need to go. This is a day people in my corner of the world share posts about the gender […]

Political Polarization in the U.S. and Social Inequalities

Democrats and Republicans are deeply divided. By definition, political parties have differences of opinion. But these divisions have widened. Twenty years ago, your opinions on political issues did not line up the way we have come to expect them. Today, when you find you share an opinion with someone about systemic racism, you’re more likely […]

“I Heart Blood Sports”: Re-Framing Menstruation

Flashback Friday. In a humorous article, Gloria Steinem asked, “What would happen, for instance, if suddenly, magically, men could menstruate and women could not?” Men, she asserted, would re-frame menstruation as a “enviable, boast-worthy, masculine event” about which they would brag (“about how long and how much”).  She writes: Street guys would brag (“I’m a […]

Church of “La La Land” Saints

Why is “La La Land” so popular among Mormons? The New York Times (here) has maps (chloropleths, if you want to show off your vocabulary) showing the popularity of the nominees for best picture. The maps look like different countries. “Fences,” for example, did best in the Southern swath from Louisiana to North Carolina but […]

Why the American Public Seems Allergic to Facts

Facts about all manner of things have made headlines recently as the Trump administration continues to make statements, reports, and policies at odds with things we know to be true. Whether it’s about the size of his inauguration crowd, patently false and fear-mongering inaccuracies about transgender persons in bathrooms, rates of violent crime in the […]

Original Recruitment Flier for Milgram’s Obedience Experiment

Flashback Friday. Bewildered by Nazi soldiers’ willingness to perpetuate the horrors of World War II, Stanley Milgram set out to test the extent to which average people would do harm if instructed by an authority figure. In what would end up being one of the most famous studies in the history of social psychology, the […]

Where do LGBT People in the U.S. Live?

I love gender and sexual demography.  It’s incredibly important work.  Understanding the size and movements of gender and sexual minority populations can help assess what kinds of resources different groups might require and where those resources would be best spent, among others things.  Gary J. Gates and Frank Newport initially published results from a then-new […]

What can the history of divorce tell us about the future of marriage?

A different version of this post was originally published at Timeline. To get some perspective on the long term trend in divorce, we need to check some common assumptions. Most importantly, we have to shake the idea that the trend is just moving in one direction, tracking a predictable course from “olden days” to “nowadays.” […]

STI Transmission: Wives, Whores, and the Invisible Man

Flashback Friday. Monica C. sent along images of a pamphlet, from 1920, warning soldiers of the dangers of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). In the lower right hand corner (close up below), the text warns that “most” “prostitutes (whores) and easy women” “are diseased.” In contrast, in the upper left corner, we see imagery of the […]

Why did millions march? A view from the many women’s marches

Why did people march on January 21, 2017? As a team of sociologists interested in social movements, we know there are many possible answers to this seemingly simple question. As a team of sociologists we have developed a multi-method, multi-site research project, Mobilizing Millions: Engendering Protest Across the Globe. We want to understand why people […]

The Problem with Femvertising (or ‘feminist’ advertising)

The 2017 Super Bowl was an intense competition full of unexpected winners and high entertainment value. Alright, I didn’t actually watch the game, nor do I even know what teams were playing. I’m referring to the Super Bowl’s secondary contest, that of advertising. The Super Bowl is when many companies will roll out their most […]

The Unbearable Whiteness of Being Human

Flashback Friday. The following are all of the immediately visible images representing modern humans (as distinct from either earlier human species or animals) from the 10 separate stories NPR published this July and August of 2010 as part of the series titled How Evolution Gave Us The Human Edge. In case you missed the obvious, […]

Possibly the most exhaustive study of “manspreading” ever conducted

“Manspreading” is a relatively new term.  According to Google Trends (below), the concept wasn’t really used before the end of 2014.  But the idea it’s describing is not new at all.  The notion that men occupy more space than women is one small piece of what Raewyn Connell refers to as the patriarchal dividend–the collection […]

This is What Democracy Looks Like!

Waves of pink knitted hats and protest signs packed the streets of D.C. on January 21, 2017, just one day after President Trump’s inauguration drew average crowds. The Women’s March of 2017 was the largest protest in recent history, bringing together over 500,000 people in DC- the location of the flagship march, and over 2.9 […]

Sociology and the Culture of Sex on Campus

Originally posted at Everyday Sociology. When new students move into their residence halls to start their first year of college, they become a part of an institution. In many ways, it is a “total institution” in the tradition of the sociologist Erving Goffman: an organization that collects large numbers of like individuals, cuts them off […]

The Missing Story behind the Coverage of the Trump Inauguration: Class

The Women’s March in Washington had three times more people in attendance than did President Trump’s inauguration. Many have argued about the reasons for these numbers (see here, here, and here), and used them both individually and together to make claims about activism and political support. But something is missing from these conversations. In order […]

Just How Big Was the 2017 Women’s March?

The 2017 Women’s March was a historic event.  Social media alone gave many of us the notion that something happened on an incredibly grand scale.  But measuring just how “grand” is an inexact science.  Women’s Marches were held around the world in protest of Trump on the day following his inauguration.  Subsequently, lots of folks […]

Not Thinking About Race: Accidentally Illustrating Evil with Skin Color

Flashback Friday. Last week NPR reported on a scale developed by a forensic psychologist, Michael Stone, on which murderers could be placed according to how evil they are (from slightly evil to really, really really evil).  To illustrate the scale, NPR developed this graphic: Let’s say, for the sake of argument, that the artists designing […]

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