Blog Profile / The Rumpus Books


URL :http://therumpus.net/sections/books/
Filed Under:Entertainment / Books
Posts on Regator:3852
Posts / Week:9.5
Archived Since:June 10, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Corinne Lee and Finding an Antidote to America’s Toxicity

Poet Corinne Lee on writing her epic book-length poem Plenty and finding new ways to live in a rapidly changing world.

The Strangely Plausible Abyss of American War

In Akkad’s dystopian scenario, the US faces a resurgent Mexico and a vast and newly powerful North African-Arabian empire.

This Week in Books: The Color She Gave Gravity

Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

Lesley Nneka Arimah’s Characters Muscle Their Way through Girlhood

In our current political climate with its rampant animosity towards immigrants, Arimah offers a humanizing portrait of both the Nigerian citizen and first generation young female immigrant.

Interrogating the English Language with Safiya Sinclair

To be forced to speak in the language of the colonist, the language of the oppressor, while also carrying within us the storm of Jamaican patois, we live under a constant hurricane of our doubleness.

The Read Along: Neda Semnani

I picked up The Odyssey because I wanted to read about wanders and refugees. A story about a man who takes a decade to get home and is on a quest for safety seemed like a good place to start.

Weaving Webs in Meghan Privitello’s Notes on the End of the World

In Notes on the End of the World, time is not linear. Memories of the past intersect with the present. In a flashback to a pre-apocalyptic carnival, we see signs of impending doom.

A Way to Make Sense of the World: The Rumpus Interview with Suzanne Buffam

Poet Suzanne Buffam discusses her latest work, A Pillow Book, sleep remedies that don’t work, and the worries that occupy her mind and keep her from sleep.

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #76: Chris Tusa

Set in post-Katrina New Orleans, Chris Tusa’s second novel, In the City of Falling Stars (Livingston Press, September 2016), tells a tale of paranoia and intrigue. Maurice Delahoussaye witnesses dead birds falling from the sky, and becomes convinced the air is toxic.

Escaping Time with All Our Wrong Todays

Mastai takes the predictable stakes of time travel (erasing the future, changing the past) and heightens them.

VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Yona Harvey

Yona Harvey talks about her path to becoming a poet, Winnie Mandela as an artistic inspiration, and what it means to write more publicly.

Daddy’s Girl Sees Daddy’s Scars in The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley

[Tinti] has cleverly illustrated the tender relationship between a father and his little girl, the respect a daughter has for her dad, and the lengths that both of them will travel to protect one another.

This Week in Books: Sorry to Disrupt the Peace

Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

Han Yujoo, Wild Child of the South Korean Literary Scene

The Impossible Fairy Tale presents a dark and fraught conception of childhood.

Writing Romance: The Rumpus Interview with Sonali Dev

Sonali Dev talks about her latest novel, A Change of Heart, the romance genre, writing non-white characters, and the parallels between writing and architectural design.

What to Read When the President Cuts Funding for Everything Good

A list of books written by past NEA grant recipients, as well as books that inspire protest and remind us that we can make a different reality than the one we're in today.

Music Always About to Begin: Not on the Last Day, but on the Very Last

Matthew Minicucci reviews Justing Boening's Not on the Last Day, but on the Very Last today in Rumpus Poetry.

The Rumpus Interview with Bonnie Jo Campbell

Bonnie Jo Campbell discusses her collection Mothers, Tell Your Daughters, the natural world as a character, and finding writing from the male point of view easier.

J. M. Coetzee’s “Bread and Beans” Writing

I am fixated by this detail of the bread and beans because it strikes me that Coetzee’s prose might itself be described as “bread and beans” writing: short, declarative sentences, with a fairly simple vocabulary.

The Rumpus Interview with Joe Ide

Joe Ide discusses his debut novel, IQ his writing process, and why he enjoys fly fishing.

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