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Blog Profile / Chemistry Blog


URL :http://www.chemistry-blog.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Chemistry
Posts on Regator:448
Posts / Week:1.8
Archived Since:July 23, 2009

Blog Post Archive

The advance of the chemical-free sciences

Chemist have long complained about the use of the term ‘chemical-free’ in marketing, particularly when used to promote organic produce. To bolster our standing, and to sure up the chemical industry, we go one about everything containing chemicals and hence  how ‘chemical-free’ is a meaningless term. Show More Summary

‘Anonymous’ peer-review – a cautionary tale

Some time ago I received a grant proposal to review. Its was from an eminent professor. I was extremely disappointed, on numerous accounts, with the quality of the proposal. In short I thought it relied very heavily on the authors standing in the community and only paid lip service to the science. And so (naively) safe … Continue reading »

New Lab Time Lapse

Eight months ago the Hanson Research Group announced our first experiment on twitter. We set out to capture, via pictures, the transition from an empty space to a fully functioning lab. This involved two Brinno TLC200 time-lapse cameras programmed to take one photo per day. Last week we stopped the camera located in the support … Continue reading »

Which science does the most magic?

A few weeks back  Vittorio had a pop at Sigma-Aldrich for marketing fluorosulfuric acid-antimony pentafluoride as ‘magic acid’.  Which got me wondering, just how common is magic in the sciences? And which disciplines are the most mystical? So I checked. A search for ‘magic’ in titles of articles using Scopus pulls up 8,698 hits. That’s a … Continue reading »

GUEST POST: The Blogversation Continues: Turning Around Public Perception on Chemicals and Chemistry

Guest post by Luke Gammon This is the second post in response to a conversation started by @chemtacular and @reneewebs (see an excellent summary by Reneé Webster of the conversation so far). In October last year, Chemistry World wrote...Show More Summary

The Blogversation Continues: A New Approach to the Fear of Chemicals and for a Course of Action

This post is part of an on-going dialogue between chemists on Twitter in an effort to unite the chemistry community do something about negative portrayal of chemicals in a positive and productive manner. I responded to Renee Webster’s kick off post and we’ve gotten a lot of excellent feedback both on Twitter and from bloggers. Show More Summary

Wellcome chemical images

The UK’s leading medical research charity, the Wellcome Trust, have donated a treasure trove to the world; 100,000 images covering the history of all aspects of medicine, science and technology are now freely available to any and all. Show More Summary

Yes, there are chemicals in the shampoo!

‘Organic’ cosmetics manufacturers, the very epicentre of chemophobia, right? All those ‘chemical-free’ bottles of deodorants, shampoos and hair dyes.  It makes you want to pull your hair out just so there’s no need for their nonsensical products. Show More Summary

Molecule of the day with a difference

Everyday Zoë Waller (a chemical biologist) posts a drawing of a molecule on her twitter feed. A quick trawl pulls up others who do similar.  But Zoë’s uses a rather unusual canvass … herself. She doesn’t graffiti herself with ink, instead she takes advantage of her unusual skin.   Zoë has dermatographia, a condition which results in her … Continue reading »

Photo Friday (#picpickoftheweek)

My graduate student, Sean Hill, became the Hanson Research Group twitter account manager last week. We first talked about what is and isn’t acceptable to post on the internet. Then Sean explained to me the nuances of hash tags and how I’ve underutilized them.  He also suggested something brilliant: a photo of the week. One … Continue reading »

Garlic Challenge, the results show!

Back in October I posed a question: Is there any truth in the old wives tale that rubbing your hands on stainless steel gets rid of garlic smells? Various theories as to how steel may achieve this were posited. But I wanted to know if there was a real effect in the first place. Kitchen … Continue reading »

Number 11, Hydrogen

Hydrogen is element one, Its abundance is second to none, Though it’s commonly found, In other compounds, Due to it’s single electron. By Nicholas Dawson aka @adventchemistry

On the 10th day of advent we have …

Benzene A century and a half ago, Chemists wanted to know, How atoms convene, To make up benzene, But frankly they had nothing to show. The bonds of which benzene’s comprised, Should not be equally sized, But that’s the array, Proposed by Kekulé, Because the electrons are delocalised. By Nicholas Dawson I think Nick maybe … Continue reading »

Behind door number 6 is phlogiston

Nick is still churning out  cracking chemistry limericks for advent. Hope you are enjoying them.   Phlogiston When trying to explain combustion, Alchemists had a conjunction, The theory decreed, For fire you need, A material containing phlogiston. Show More Summary

Behind door number 9. The surprise discovery of viagra

The blog has been down for a few days so we’ve missed a few advent limericks. Normal service not resumed.   Surprise discovery of viagra A drug called sildenafil citrate, Was meant to make vessels dilate, Angina would fast, Be a thing of the past, If the side effects didn’t negate.   It’s not that … Continue reading »

Recapping Mike Shatruk’s AMA

Mike Shatruk, chair of Florida State University’s chemistry graduate recruiting & admissions committee, hosted an AMA (ask me anything) on reddit.com/r/chemistry last week. Over a span of three days, he answered redditor’s questions about applying to graduate programs, factors in admission decisions, faculty advisor selection, and more. Show More Summary

Chemical limericks for advent 5th December:

Don’t drop nitroglycerine! A pyromaniac sealed his fate When nitroglycerine did detonate A flask dropped to the floor He was no more Due to its shockingly sensitive state.

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