Blog Profile / Nieman Journalism Lab


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Archived Since:September 4, 2009

Blog Post Archive

An Ann Arbor magazine created a daily newsletter to help fill gaps in the city’s local news coverage

In 2009, The Ann Arbor News shut down, leaving Ann Arbor, Michigan, without a (non-college-produced) daily newspaper. The paper, owned by Advance Publications, was replaced with AnnArbor.com — a website and twice-weekly print paper. The site and paper have gone through several iterations since then, and the staff and resources focused specifically on Ann Arbor...

Newsonomics: The new Knight-Lenfest initiative gives a kick in the pants to America’s metro newspapers

For two decades now, daily newsrooms have been becoming digital. Now, finally into 2017, some of them are threatening to actually be digital, some twenty-two years after Nicholas Negroponte’s classic was published. Today’s announcement...Show More Summary

With “Burst Your Bubble,” The Guardian pushes readers beyond their political news boundaries

Take a peek at the bestseller lists and it’s clear that people are grappling with President Trump by reading things they might not have otherwise. As of this morning, George Orwell’s 1984 is No. 3 on Amazon’s list of bestselling books and Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale at No. 8. But in this time of...

In Chicago, two news orgs are using texting and live events to widen the reach of their reporting on lead

How do you get your reporting about a public health issue to more people when a significant percentage of your audience doesn’t have consistent access to the Internet? For two news organizations in Chicago, the answer involves texting, in-person events, and, yes, even print. In December, Chicago nonprofit print magazine South Side Weekly and community...

Local News Lab relaunches its site, with new guides for local newsrooms on newsletters, events, and more

Are you a small newsroom focused on local news, wondering how to even begin growing one of those email newsletters that are being touted as significant sources of readership as well as revenue for your site? Is your newsroom interested in raising money from readers for specific projects for the first time, but hoping to...

Wikipedia calls the Daily Mail “generally unreliable,” and bans it as a source in most cases

Following about a month of discussion, Wikipedia editors have decided to prohibit the use of the Daily Mail as a source in most situations, writing: [The] Daily Mail should not be used for determining notability, nor should it be used as a source in articles. An edit filter should be put in place going forward...

People are okay at remembering where they get news online (but still think Facebook’s a news outlet)

Spend a day clicking back and forth between online news and other stuff and it’s not that surprising that you might not remember what you read where. A study out Thursday from the Pew Research Center looks at how Americans get news online; whether they can recall the names of the news sources that they...

With $1.1 million in funding from Knight, OpenNews is becoming an independent organization

When it was founded in 2011 as a partnership of the Mozilla Foundation and the Knight Foundation, the central focus of Knight-Mozilla OpenNews was a fellowship program that embedded developers and technologists into newsrooms to help outlets change their culture while also embracing Mozilla’s ethos of the open web. In the years since then, OpenNews’...

With its new Spotify bundle, The New York Times is chasing a new, younger base of subscribers

As former Netscape CEO Jim Barksdale once said, “There are only two ways to make money in business: One is to bundle; the other is unbundle.” Media companies, enterally swinging (or being swung) between the two, may be drifting back into the bundling phase. Tony Haile’s anticipated startup Scroll and Blendle’s new premium product both...

Independent Journal Review wants to be recognized (and not just for its impressive traffic numbers)

Before Judge Neil Gorsuch was nominated to the Supreme Court last week, news organizations were largely reporting that Donald Trump had whittled his original list of potential nominees down to two and was playing reality-show with the nomination process, as both Gorsuch and another prospective nominee, Thomas Hardiman, headed to Washington ahead of the final...

Don’t ask users to tag unemployed friends (and other lessons for newsrooms on Facebook)

You wouldn’t leap into a conversation by asking a stranger to write you an editorial on respect for human life, or name friends who have trouble affording childcare. But news organizations are making some of those same mistakes in attempts to engage readers on Facebook. It’s important to, instead, “interact like a human”: That’s one...

Twitter rolls out three new ways to fight abuse

Twitter has long been criticized for how it handles abuse and trolls on its platform, and on Tuesday the company unveiled its latest attempt to deal with the problem with three new features. Just the beginning, more to come… https://t.co/cpZYUtY6aO — Ed Ho (@mrdonut) February 7, 2017 Twitter said it will prevent previously suspended users...

The true crime show that’s gotten comparisons to Serial is heading for a second season and a new case

Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 106, published February 7, 2017. The Serial team forms a new production company, Serial Productions, and drops details on its latest project. This story got tons of pick-up when it was announced last Wednesday — getting write-ups on Variety, Deadline, EW.com, and Vulture, which I wrote...

Follow the Money is both good advice for journalists and an investigative site aiming for 20,000 paying members

There’s a famous scene in the film version of All the President’s Men. Woodward and Bernstein have hit a wall in their reporting. So Woodward, played by Robert Redford, goes to meet his source — Deep Throat — in a parking garage. Deep Throat won’t explicitly tell Woodward what he wants to know, but instead...

As a presidential election looms in France, Google and Facebook team up with news outlets to factcheck

In France, Google and Facebook are hoping to get ahead of the “fake news” fury that exploded in the U.S. shortly after the November presidential election. Google announced Monday it’s teaming up with media outlets from Agence France-Presse to BuzzFeed News to Le Monde on a countrywide factchecking initiative the partners are calling CrossCheck. As...

Univision’s plans for the former Gawker sites: A shared business backend, less duplication, and a push into TV

What exactly is Fusion? is a question many asked when the Univision- and ABC/Disney-backed television venture first launched, and asked again when it began hiring big-name journalists to helm its digital news arm, and again when the news site debuted in 2015. What Fusion wanted to be evolved yet again, as it expanded its target...

The history of American conspiracy theories holds some lessons for fake news debunkers, says Jessie Walker

“Pundits tend to write off political paranoia as a feature of the fringe, a disorder that occasionally flares up until the sober center can put out the flames. They’re wrong.” Jesse Walker, books editor at Reason Magazine, wrote that in his 2013 book The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory, though the idea could just...

How local publisher Technically Media is trying to diversify its business with a focus on community

Last winter, Christopher Wink and Brian James Kirk, the cofounders of Technically Media, realized they’d made a mistake. The Philadelphia-based company, which publishes local tech sites in five Mid-Atlantic markets, had crossed $1 million in revenue for the first time in 2015, finishing with about $1.1 million. It had also grown by making its first...

Newspaper readers in the U.K. still spend nearly 90 percent of their time with print. Oh well?

When The New York Times released its earnings report this week, most of the immediate attention was on digital: The Times added 276,000 net new digital subscribers in the fourth quarter of 2016 — its best quarter since 2011, when it first launched its paywall. But all of those new digital readers — and an...

What happens when a mid-sized city loses its last daily newspaper? Guelph, Ontario offers a case study

For newspapers, death comes slowly, then all at once. One year ago, Canadian newspaper company Metroland Media announced that the 149-year-old “intensely local” Guelph Mercury, one of the oldest newspapers in the country, would stop publishing its print edition. The announcement came on a Monday; on Friday, Jan. 29, the paper printed its last issue,...

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