Blog Profile / Nieman Journalism Lab


URL :http://www.niemanlab.org
Filed Under:Media / Media Industry News
Posts on Regator:3189
Posts / Week:8
Archived Since:September 4, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Nieman Lab is looking for more stories of digital innovation outside the U.S., and we’d love your help

Last year, 44 percent of Nieman Lab’s web traffic came from outside the United States. More than half of our Twitter followers and 70 percent of those who like our Facebook page are based outside of the U.S. We do our best to cover journalism innovation around the world, but from our lovely office in...

Google, the advertising company, could bring native adblocking to Chrome

Google is taking a counterintuitive approach to countering adblocking: building an adblocking feature of its own. The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday night that Google is considering bringing an adblocking feature to the desktop and mobile versions of its Chrome web browser. The feature, which could be turned on by default, would block ads...

The Financial Times started a mergers and acquisitions newsletter for its highest-paying subscribers

After a short trip to China where he met with business and government leaders, Financial Times editor Lionel Barber was faced with a conundrum that many journalists know well. Barber co-wrote a number of stories for the FT based on the interviews he conducted, but he still had interesting material pertaining to mergers and acquisitions...

How the Argentinian daily La Nación became a data journalism powerhouse in Latin America

In 2010, political reporter Diego Cabot of Argentina’s La Nación received a leak with massive potential: a CD with 26,000 emails from the minister of transportation under then-President Cristina Kirchner. For two weeks, four La Nación journalists pored over thousands of documents by hand. But then the paper’s then-IT manager Ricardo Brom built a search...

NPR is bringing back ’90s hip-hop DJs Stretch and Bobbito

In the 1990s, DJs Stretch Armstrong (Adrian Bartos) and Bobbito (Robert) Garcia introduced listeners to future stars like Notorious B.I.G., Jay-Z, Eminem, and Nas on their show on Columbia University’s WKCR. “At that point in time, your show was the most important show in the world,” Nas said in a 2015 Kickstarter campaign that Stretch...

The Los Angeles Times built a Slack bot that lets the newsroom know when the coffee is ready

Of the many small, annoying things about working in an office, coffee is usually somewhere on the list. Whose turn is it to make it? Who is drinking more than their share of the communal pot? Is that half-full carafe still warm? So some folks at the Los Angeles Times built a Slack bot for...

This handy little tool draws from Bloomberg data to add financial context on top of any news article

The United Airlines debacle earlier this month began with Chicago Aviation Police forcibly dragging a 69-year-old passenger from a flight and continued through a week of facepalm-worthy PR moves and unified public outrage. When United CEO Oscar Munoz finally issued an apology, people seized on the company’s plummeting stock:.@united stock is getting a bit...

A Boston Globe memo puts the spotlight on an emerging consensus on how to transform metro papers

The Boston Globe on Monday published a memo from editor Brian McGrory outlining the latest steps the paper is taking to restructure its newsroom as it adjusts to the evolving journalistic landscape. The Globe plan focuses on publishing stories earlier in the day, restructuring beats, creating new audience engagement and express desks, and thinking of...

Newsonomics: Crimetown shows the podcast potential for local media partnership

Buddy Cianci once sold newspapers. Now he sells podcasts. That link — surfaced gloriously in Gimlet Media’s Crimetown podcast — tells us lots about the rollicking pace of change in newsy digital media. And Crimetown seems like a prototype of a new phenomenon too young to name. Listen for just a few minutes, beyond Crimetown’s...

“If a Serial episode was a mountain peak, S-Town was the Himalayas”

Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 116, published April 18, 2017. Midroll formalizes the Stitcher editorial brand. When I wrote up the return of First Day Back for last week’s newsletter, I was mostly thinking out loud when discussing its label as a Stitcher show and how that might’ve hinted...

Elite Daily lost a ton of money, but Bustle just bought it from the Daily Mail anyway

Elite Daily has done pretty well for a publication that doesn’t do very well. The Daily Mail’s parent company, DMGT, acquired it for at least $26 million in January 2015, then announced at the end of last year that it was writing down that investment because of Elite Daily’s “disappointing” performance. Nonetheless, Bustle, another site...

Uma “Wikipédia de verificação de factos” para ajudar a dar contexto

Pode não ser tarde de mais para uma pequena correcção no rumo da maneira como todos consumimos e avaliamos (ou não) a informação num ambiente digital. Mas incluir alguma diversidade ideológica nas “dietas mediáticas” dos leitores está longe de ser um remédio milagroso para o problema da desinformação e das “câmaras de eco” parciais que...

A Croatian news app starts with the premise that news discovery has become too personalized

The news and information we consume is becoming increasingly tailored to our interests and habits. Our Facebook feeds are algorithmically controlled, and publishers such as The New York Times — which is reportedly planning a personalized homepage — are also attempting to mold their content to readers’ preferences. A new app, however, is trying to...

The French magazine L’Obs is using Facebook Messenger to follow undecided voters

Over the past few weeks leading up to the first votes in the French presidential election on April 23, Léa, an unemployed 25-year-old from Vendee, a region on the country’s western coast, has changed her mind about who she plans to vote for at least three times. First she planned on casting her ballot for...

The FCC spectrum auction is sending $10 billion to broadcasters. Where will that money go?

Here are some numbers of a magnitude rarely seen in news media. $19.8 billion — that’s how much revenue resulted from participating broadcasters selling parts of their broadcast spectrum to wireless carriers hoping to expand their nationwide...Show More Summary

Fake News Ale is the beer all the cool journalists are gonna be drinking this summer

What if social media isn’t actually the problem? “The growth in polarization in recent years is largest for the demographic groups least likely to use the internet and social media.” That’s the main finding of a working paper published last month by researchers from Brown and Stanford for the National Bureau of Economic Research and...

The Times of London says focus on editions has driven digital growth

Minutes after the attack in central London last month, news organizations all around the world rolled out their breaking news coverage, booting up live blogs and tweeting out the latest developments. The Times of London, like other outlets, posted a story within 10 to 15 minutes of the 2:40 p.m. attack, but it mostly stayed...

Fake news is affecting people’s trust in the news they read on Facebook

A lot of people get their news on Facebook — but a lot of people don’t believe the news they read on Facebook. That’s according to a new survey from BuzzFeed and Ipsos Public Affairs, who quizzed 3,000 American adults on their views about Facebook and the news. The results were not pretty. Over half of those who took...

News and media literacy the way it’s always been taught may not be the right response to fake news woes

Fake news and news literacy and community engagement sometimes feel like new topics — and especially urgent ones, given nightmare-come-to-life incidents like Pizzagate. But many people, including plenty in academia, have been plugging away at this line of work since well before Facebook had a fake news PR situation on its hands, before Pizzagate, before...

With new editor Joe Brown, Popular Science is using a “Trojan horse” strategy to take on science skeptics

In today’s political climate, “Popular Science” sounds a little like an oxymoron. Some people’ denials of climate change, evolution, and the efficacy of vaccines — issues that scientific research has repeatedly affirmed — have helped make science itself into a partisan issue, and scientists themselves into another interest group among many. It’s a tough time...

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