Blog Profile / Nieman Journalism Lab


URL :http://www.niemanlab.org
Filed Under:Media / Media Industry News
Posts on Regator:3680
Posts / Week:8.4
Archived Since:September 4, 2009

Blog Post Archive

Television has won

The Internet used to be something you read. In 2018, it will officially be something you watch. Two decades after the web posed an unexpectedly serious challenge to television in the 1990s, we can now comfortably say television has won. It has conquered the internet, the media, and thereby the world. Not just as a...

(Hint: It’s about your brand)

We know from research one of the primary reasons people pay for news now is for coverage of a specific topic they care about. In 2018, the reason people pay for news will be less transactional and less about the tangible exchange of goods, but instead based on the ~emotional~ relationship a news organization has...

Breaking free from the tyranny of the loudest

What surfaces on the timelines of our social media accounts can make the world seem like a divided place where people only shout from the top of their lungs — whether it is to call out the wrongs of those they disagree with or to cheer on the actions of those with whom they identify....

More female reporters abroad (please)

The scoop of the last century came from Clare Hollingworth, who reported on the outbreak of World War II. The British reporter died this year, at age 105. She was an inspiration for generations of aspiring female foreign reporters. But almost eighty years after Hollingworth’s spectacular exclusive, women reporters posted abroad are still fairly far...

The reckoning is only beginning

In many respects, 2017 was the year of resistance. People fought back. They organized. They marched. They ran for office. We covered it and struggled with how best to facilitate these conversations. In some newsrooms, we opened the door for listening and people stepped forward to tell their stories. As we close out 2017, dozens...

It’s time for media companies to #PassTheMic

2018 will be the year where frank talk about race and racism in newsrooms will replace ephemeral promises to diversify. And it must. From the front pages of the country’s most prestigious newspapers to the anchor desks of the most influential radio and television stations, journalists of color not only remain less visible than their...

Memes and visuals come to the fore

If 2017 ushered in a growing awareness and conversation in the Western world about the impact of misinformation, disinformation, and media manipulation, 2018 is the year we start taking memetic misinformation and disinformation seriously. As Nausicaa Renner wrote early in 2017, “The fake news conversation has taken place in the realm of words, but that’s...

Real lives are at stake in rural areas

Hey there Blue State folks! Those of us out here in the rest of the country are glad that over the last year you’ve shown an interest in making our acquaintance. Recently, several prominent media organizations took it a step further, announcing support for local journalists. The Nieman Foundation recently announced the Abrams Nieman Fellowship...

Venture funding and digital news don’t mix

A restaurant is not a venture-scale business. A factory is not a venture-scale business. A digital news platform, as many have hinted of late, is not a venture-scale business. And that’s not a bad thing. In the past several years, we’ve seen digital news platforms hedge against Facebook and Google by converting niche audiences into...

Collaboration is the way forward for Brazilian journalism

We Brazilian journalists have to admit that we can do more to contribute to the public debate. Every post published by a newspaper in its social networks triggers comments that are examples of how Brazilian society is divided and, worse, intolerant. The polarization we saw in 2014 is increasing even more as we enter 2018...

Pivot to mobile video frustration

I think that the short-term gains of the infamous “pivot to video” tactic — that it brings in more advertising dollars — will start to plummet as publishers and advertisers realize that this isn’t the content that consumers actually want. So many more people are consuming news and content on phones, and video on mobile...

The year of the great reckoning

The #metoo movement has come to journalism, but the #onlineabuse conversation will overtake that as journalists worldwide rebel against the 24/7 commodification of their lives by media organizations and hold management to account for their always-on, social media policies and the pimping of their emotional wellbeing.

News games rule

Four years ago, @runixo made an interactive world map that showed how a few thousand of security cameras connected to the internet were broadcasting live through the networks without the owners knowing. We put on the front page of a newspaper, Página/12, and the blowback lived for exactly one morning. Then suddenly, a few days...

Letting black women tell their own stories

Many movements in 2017 were either started or shaped by black women. From #MeToo to the recent special election for the Alabama Senate seat, black women showed up and showed out. But too often their voices were drowned out by those with more visibility and left unheard by those who were able to silence them....

Skepticism and narcissism

2018 is the year when our skepticism has to be stronger than our narcissism. You remember Narcissus, right? The hot young Greek who fell so passionately in love with his reflection that he wasted away and died? All that remains of Narcissus is his namesake flower — something strictly ornamental and meant to be cut...

Design connects storytelling and strategy

We all want the user to take an action. Editorial wants another click or more time spent on site. Revenue wants another display ad. Audience wants a funnel entry point. Video wants that preroll. In any media business, every stakeholder has a goal to achieve. By aligning strategies from revenue, video, editorial, and audience departments,...

The New York Times has halved its free monthly articles to 5, its most significant paywall change since 2012

The great paywall tightening of 2017 continues. The New York Times said Friday that it will cut the number of free articles available to “most” non-subscribers each month from 10 to five, Bloomberg reported. The change is the most significant one the Times has made to its pay model since 2012, when it cut the...

Maybe it’s also time to start calling fact-checking something else. (Anybody got any ideas?)

“Social media is still a relatively small of most people’s news diet.” Stanford economist Matthew Gentzkow came to Northeastern University yesterday to go over a bunch of his research to try to answer three questions: 1. Are Americans more polarized than ever? 2. Is it the Internet’s fault? 3. Did fake news change the 2016...

Stratechery, but for jokes about Frasier: Mallory Ortberg tries the paid newsletter route

Our old friend Tim Carmody recently revived his email newsletter (and started a Patreon, go give him love), and today’s edition features an interview with the writer Mallory Ortberg, perhaps best known as one of the founders of the late The Toast. Among other things, they talk about Ortberg’s new experiment into subscriber-supported media —...

Why don’t people trust the news and social media? A new report lets them explain in their own words

A new report from the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism offers a bit more insight into what’s driving distrust in news organizations across the world. Working with YouGov, the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism polled around 18,000 people across nine countries (U.S., Germany, UK, Ireland, Spain, Denmark, Australia, France, and Greece)...

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC