Blog Profile / Nieman Journalism Lab


URL :http://www.niemanlab.org
Filed Under:Media / Media Industry News
Posts on Regator:2625
Posts / Week:7.2
Archived Since:September 4, 2009

Blog Post Archive

The Washington Post is dabbling in translations to reach a growing non-English speaking audience

The Washington Post was preparing to publish an editorial on the Obama administration’s move, in December of 2014, to restore ties with Cuba, when executive editor Marty Baron asked about a Spanish translation. (Fun fact: Baron, born and raised in Tampa, speaks fluent Spanish.) “Marty came and said, so we’re doing this story about Cuba....

The Telegraph is trying to streamline soccer live blogging with an automated graphic system

In the 79th minute of last fall’s Rugby World Cup Final, New Zealand fly-half Beauden Barrett scored a try to ice the All Blacks’ victory over rival Australia. Seconds after Barrett downed the ball, a graphic mapping the score appeared in the live blog that the British newspaper The Telegraph was using to cover the...

$1,884 to quote 300 words from The New York Times in a book: Two authors try to stand up for fair use

Obtaining formal permission to use three quotations from New York Times articles in a book ultimately cost two professors $1,884. They’re outraged, and have taken to Kickstarter — in part to recoup the charges, but primarily, they say, to “protest the Times’ and publishers’ lack of respect for Fair Use.” Two California professors, Daniel C....

5 things publishers can learn from how Jeff Bezos is running The Washington Post

Bob Woodward, the legendary Washington Post reporter who was one-half of the duo that brought down a president, spoke at the First Parish Church in Cambridge last October to promote a new book. The Last of the President’s Men was about Alexander Butterfield, the aide who revealed the existence of the taping system in Richard Nixon’s...

Selling subscriptions through Apple is getting better for publishers — but also for everyone else

Monday is Apple’s big day for software announcements at its annual WWDC conference, but we got an early peek at one of them at The Verge and Daring Fireball today — and it’s one that’ll be of interest to publishers. The Verge’s Lauren Goode: In a rare pre-WWDC sit-down interview with the The Verge, Phil...

The Guardian is experimenting with interactive, auto-updating push alerts to cover big stories

For such a new technology, the news notification is a format that got really safe really quickly. For most publishers, notifications are rarely more complex than a headline that, when tapped, sends readers to their site. Some publishers, like Quartz and BuzzFeed, have experimented with the language within notifications, trading the stiff formality of newspaper headlines for a...

Honolulu Civil Beat, after six years of trying life as a for-profit, is becoming a nonprofit after all

The Honolulu Civil Beat, the six-year-old Hawaii-based news site launched by Pierre Omidyar, is becoming a nonprofit, the organization said Wednesday. It’s dropping its metered paywall and introducing a membership program. Existing subscribers will become founding members of the site. Show More Summary

Meet the Press host Chuck Todd on maintaining the show’s presence in a “24/7 digital journalism” world

Chuck Todd doesn’t like buzzwords. In the half hour that we spoke, the Meet the Press host qualified his use of “millennial,” “old/legacy/traditional media,” and “media narrative.” Other common phrases that pepper digital journalism-speak seemed to catch in his throat. Show More Summary

There are now more Americans working for online-only outlets than newspapers

There are now more Americans working for online publishers and broadcasters than for newspapers, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment at online outlets first eclipsed newspapers in October 2015. As of March, there were 197,800 Americans working in the “internet publishing and broadcasting” sector versus 183,200 people working for U.S....

Instagram now shows you the “moments you care about” first. How should news orgs react?

Instagram has rolled its new, algorithm-driven feed out to all of its users: Now, instead of seeing posts in chronological order, you’ll see what Instagram deems to be “the moments you care about” at the top of your feed. The change, the company says, is driven by the fact that people miss 70 percent of...

Hot Pod: Is the Stitcher deal a step toward a closed podcast ecosystem?

Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue seventy-six, published June 7, 2016. Big moves at Midroll Media and EW Scripps. Okay, two big things from Midroll: (1) E.W. Scripps, the parent company of Midroll Media, has acquired Stitcher, the podcasting app that’s widely considered to be the most popular alternative to...

Here’s some of what journalists and media execs talked about at Europe’s Newsgeist this weekend

At Newsgeist Europe this past weekend, a few dozen journalists, executives, technologists, and media thinkers assembled once again to dish on the future of news. The mostly secret, mostly male event, created in partnership with Google and the Knight Foundation, played a significant part in the development of Google’s AMP last year. The latest event, held...

This new collaboration hopes to aid the endless debates about media with some actual hard data

It’s hard to prove or disprove allegations of media bias, or to notice any change in how global issues are covered, globally. Calls of too little or too much coverage are frequently anecdotal, and the takes from indignant journalists no more data-driven. These debates over media representation are tough to answer definitively without data. How,...

What happens when a 50-something journalist gets a week’s worth of news from Snapchat Discover?

Snapchat wants to be a news source, so I spent the last week on a Snapchat-only diet. I gave up my breakfast routine of The New York Times, The Washington Post, and the Politico Playbook and tried to survive on the light snacks from the app’s Discover providers. In the words of the cliché-loving journalists...

Report: Ad tech (and the garbage #content it funds) is killing the web

Ad technology is ruining the web as dubious websites game traffic to take advantage of the algorithms the ad tech companies use to place ads, according to a paper out from Kalkis Research, a French research firm. News organizations, desperate for traffic, feed into the system by using systems such as Taboola and Outbrain which...

The 100-year-old Brookings Institution is working to turn itself into more of a digital publisher

When scholars and experts study social mobility, they typically use intergenerational quintile transition matrices to discuss inequality and economic opportunity. In August 2014, Richard V. Reeves, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution,...Show More Summary

Tribune gets Troncked: A reader’s guide to the Tribune/Gannett war

In a move that, even amid all the nastiness of the Tribune/Gannett war, we would still have to consider stunning, Tribune Publishing has renamed itself — to tronc. In a memo to Tribune staff this afternoon, CEO Justin Dearborn wrote: Today, I am pleased to announce another important step in our transformation — the renaming...

Snapchat reportedly has more daily users than Twitter. What does that mean for news?

Snapchat now has more active daily users than Twitter, Bloomberg reported Thursday. Snapchat has 150 million active daily users, up from 110 million in December, Bloomberg reported. Twitter, meanwhile, has less than 140 million. Even though Snapchat is growing among younger users, Twitter remains a more popular platform for news consumption. Nine percent of American...

What does the intersection of race and culture sound like? NPR’s Code Switch is looking for the right mix

By the end of my conversation with Code Switch reporters Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby, it wasn’t clear who was interviewing whom. I’d wanted to talk to them about the long-awaited podcast that Code Switch, NPR’s race and culture outlet, was launching, but when I got on the conference call the conversation tumbled around...

Time Inc. launches Extra Crispy: Breakfast #content with a hefty side of marketing jargon

Maybe you weren’t in the mood to hear about Bacon Critic on Twitter all day, but that’s too bad for you, because on Wednesday, Time Inc. launched Extra Crispy, a breakfast-focused vertical run out of its Brooklyn-based “creative lab” The Foundry. And yes, Extra Crispy is hiring a bacon critic — or, to be way...

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