Blog Profile / Nieman Journalism Lab


URL :http://www.niemanlab.org
Filed Under:Media / Media Industry News
Posts on Regator:3680
Posts / Week:8.4
Archived Since:September 4, 2009

Blog Post Archive

A snap election (and global worries over fake news) spur fact-checking collaborations in Japan

When Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe dissolved the parliament and called a national election in late September, Japan’s newest fact-checking initiatives saw an opportunity to test the waters. As Abe’s party rolled into a decisive victory last week, it did so relatively free from the disinformation battleground that has roiled national polls from the U.K....

CNN’s three month-old daily Snapchat show The Update avoids the “bells and whistles and flashes”

Maintaining a 24-hour news TV channel is one thing. Developing a daily show on Snapchat Discover is another. Three months after making the transition from the Discover platform’s text-based newsmagazine format to a daily video show, CNN’s Snapchat style is clearly different from other publishers on the app known for captivating teenagers’ attention with instantaneous...

Need a super, super secure way to access The New York Times site? Now you can try it via a Tor Browser

If you’re in a situation where reading The New York Times online might get you in trouble, or you’re somewhere where the Times is blocked, or you’re serious about maintaining digital privacy, take note: The Times site is now being offered as a Tor Onion service, Runa Sandvik, director of information security for the Times,...

How Medium is attracting premium publishers to its partner program (hint: money up front)

Would you pay, online, for something that you already have access to free online? Medium hopes that the answer is yes. Last month, the site started running, behind its $5/month paywall, “curated content” from a couple dozen publishers. Some (the Financial Times, The New York Times, The Economist) have paywalls of their own. Many others...

When fake news is funny (or “funny”), is it harder to get people to stop sharing it?

Psychology says: Facebook factchecks don’t work very well. New research from Yale’s Gordon Pennycook and David Rand (they of the memorable “bullshit receptivity” research) found that Facebook’s “disputed” labels are likely to backfire in many cases. Brendan Nyhan writes up some of their recent work for The New York Times and brings in his own...

When a Facebook test moves news stories to a separate feed, traffic — and public discourse — are at stake

It’s Facebook’s world; we just live in it. Facebook recently launched a test — and tests, for the platform over the years, are a dime a dozen — of a new and separate feed outside the main News Feed all its users see when they log on. Called Explore and marked with a rocketship icon,...

Reading the news on Trump: Are we empty vessels or active filters?

Strategic, mindful, emotional, and attached: These four features capture the main ways in which a sample of 72 American adults read news stories about President Donald Trump. The dominant post-election mainstream media focus has been on on fake news, propaganda, misinformation, alleged foreign influence, and the failed civic duty of social media platforms and search...

The Guardian Mobile Lab’s latest experiment targets public transit commuters with an offline news app

Over the summer, the Guardian Mobile Innovation Lab hinted at its next experiment: improving the experience of consuming news when offline. Now it’s revealed the trial product, a news app that incorporates location sharing, content and time customizations, and user data transparency — but is only available for the next few months. The Lab introduced...

Blade Runner 2017: Quartz created a bot to hunt down political news bots on Twitter

To ferret out some of the many bots on Twitter that push out political opinions, Quartz has created a bot of its own. The new bot, @probabot_, is designed to search Twitter for accounts that are heavily focused on political topics. These accounts are fed into a tool called Botometer, which uses machine learning to...

Civil, the blockchain-based journalism marketplace, is building its first batch of publications

If you’re still confused by Civil, the cryptocurrency-based journalism marketplace that went public this summer, you’re probably not alone. Since the company made its first appearance, reactions have included muted excitement, bewilderment, and outright dismissal about the company’s potential to provide a viable new funding model for journalism. Show More Summary

Newsonomics: Can startup Invisibly be the new revenue stream publishers dream of?

Oh no, can it be another news micropayments play? With the seemingly sudden sense that there have got to be ways other than a full-bore subscription for readers to help pay the freighted costs of producing news, 2018 will bring multiple bold new efforts to revive the news business. Now you can add a new...

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“Maybe it is a purist attitude we have, but we believe that being funded by your readers is the best guarantee for independence”

Four years ago, the small Belgian online investigative outlet Apache published a story about the curious case of an old garage in the city of Antwerp that had been bought and immediately resold for €1 million Euros in profit. The then–chief of staff of the mayor of Antwerp was an ex-employee of the real estate...

Are you a low-quality web page? (Are you sure?) Facebook sheds a little light on its algorithm

Publishers may feel (even) less charitable toward Facebook this week after news trickled out yesterday that the company is “experimenting” (in at least six countries) with a change to News Feed that moves “almost all non-promoted posts” to a secondary, harder-to-find “Explore” feed. In the countries where it’s being tested, it has resulted in “the...

Can sports turn the local podcast business into a green monster?

Welcome to Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts. This is issue 137, published October 24, 2017. WBUR wades into the daily podcast grind…with sports. So, one of the structural advantages of on-demand audio — and of the internet more broadly, with the way it collapses physical space — is how it allows publishers to identify,...

Maybe the future of American news publishing is…Europe? (and other bleak ad-related scenarios)

“It feels to me as though America is becoming more European,” said Emily Bell, director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism. “It’s saying the not-for-profit sector has a real place in publishing, not just a sort of patch to get from here to the next profitable model. And then it’s asking, please, Europe, help...

“Exceedingly generous”: Google will split revenue with publishers who use its new subscription tools

Google, an advertising giant, has been making nice with news publishers by developing a series of tools they can use to more precisely attract and target paid subscribers. (It also ended the first-click-free policy this month, allowing subscription-based publishers to choose how many articles to show to readers for free without search-ranking consequence.) Google’s nice...

Atlas Obscura is using virtual reality to transport readers to the world’s distant, exotic locations

Atlas Obscura has built its brand and business around its mission to help people discover the real world. Now it’s experimenting with bringing that ethos to the virtual world as well. This summer, the site launched the first season of Atlas Obscura VR, a series of virtual reality videos that let viewers explore exotic locales...

A big week for tech blowback: Regulation, broken promises, and Facebook victimhood

The bloom has come off the rose for the big tech companies. The last few weeks have not been good to the likes of Facebook, Google, and Twitter, which are taking increasing heat for their unwillingness — or inability — to grapple with the their outsize influence, particularly as it relates to the results of...

The Honest Ads Act would force Internet companies to change their disclosure practices by January 2018

A bill to make Internet companies reveal who is paying for ads. U.S. Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Mark Warner (D-VA), and John McCain (R-AZ) on Thursday announced the Honest Ads Act, which aims to increase the transparency of online political ads by forcing Internet companies to disclose who’s buying them. The full text of the...

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