Blog Profile / Technology Review Editors' Blog


URL :http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/
Filed Under:Technology
Posts on Regator:2937
Posts / Week:10.5
Archived Since:February 15, 2010

Blog Post Archive

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind

Network scientists have discovered how social networks can create the illusion that something is common when it is actually rare.

Other Interesting arXiv Papers (Week ending June 27, 2015)

The best of the rest from the Physics arXiv this week. Could Optical Lattices Be Used to Simulate Real Materials?

Google’s Cars are Now Smarter, and Slower

Custom-made, and painfully slow, self-driving cars are now roaming the streets of Mountain View. If you find yourself stuck behind a car driving at excruciatingly slow speeds around Silicon Valley in the coming weeks, there may be little point honking your horn.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending June 27, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending June 27, 2015)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review. Betrayed by Dre?Fascinating story about Beats headphones in which the creator of Monster (the audio accessory company, which did manufacture Beats) alleges he came up with the idea for the headphones brand and was later betrayed by Dr. Show More Summary

How Machine Vision Solved One of the Great Mysteries of 20th-Century Surrealist Art

The great Belgian surrealist Magritte painted two versions of one of his masterpieces, and nobody has been able to distinguish the original from the copy. Until now. In 1983, a painting by the Belgian surrealist René Magritte came up for auction in New York. Show More Summary

Slack Keeps On Growing

The maker of work communication software, one of our 50 Smartest Companies, now has over 1 million users each day. Slack—one of our 50 Smartest Companies for 2015 (see “The New Water Cooler”)—has grown rapidly since launching in February 2014, and on Wednesday the maker of work communication software offered some new insights about just how popular it’s gotten.

Watch This

Medical sensors will make wearable tech indispensable for all of us. Wearable devices were supposed to make us smarter and healthier. They were supposed to provide useful data that was previously difficult or even impossible to attain. Show More Summary

Fighting for Zach

The treatment for cancer is often as devastating as the disease itself. When my oldest son, Zach, was five years old, he was diagnosed with an aggressive type of cancer called acute myeloid leukemia.

Data Mining Reveals the Surprising Factors Behind Successful Movies

The secret to making profitable movies will amaze you. (Spoiler: it’s not hiring top box office stars.)

Fitbit's Stock Takes Off, But Wearables Still Need Work

Investors are excited about the fitness tracker company, but we’re still a long way from awesome, medically-accurate wearables. Fitbit’s first two days of trading were good ones: on Thursday, the activity-tracker company’s shares soared $9.68, or 48 percent, to $29.68, and on Friday, they climbed another $2.82, or 9.5 percent, to end the week at $32.50.

The Real Software Security Problem Is Us

The only reason our online life is insecure is that we let it happen. A colleague recently described a fun Friday night for his teenage son: staying home and chatting online. Every now and then there’s a party where all his friends talk on their laptops.

Other Interesting arXiv Papers (Week ending June 20, 2015)

The best of the rest from the Physics arXiv this week. When-To-Post on Social Networks

Solving the Last Great 3-D Printing Challenge: Printing in Color

Nobody mentions the big problem with 3-D printing: how to do it in color. Now they won’t have to, thanks to a new technique.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending June 20, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending June 20, 2015)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review. Inside Obama’s Stealth StartupPresident Obama has hired a team of Silicon Valley software engineers to reboot the U.S. government’s online services. —Tom Simonite, San Francisco bureau chief

Data Mining Reveals How Human Health Varies with City Size

If you live in a big city, you are more likely to catch flu but less likely to die of a heart attack or be diagnosed with diabetes, say public health scientists.

Google DeepMind Teaches Artificial Intelligence Machines to Read

The best way for AI machines to learn is by feeding them huge data sets of annotated examples, and the Daily Mail has unwittingly created one.

EmTech Digital 2015 Media Coverage

MIT Technology Review’s Annual Emerging Digital Technology Event Garners Hundreds of Stories and Millions of Eyeballs With a line-up of excellent speakers including the executive team of Magic Leap, Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield, Viv...Show More Summary

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