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Blog Profile / Technology Review Editors' Blog


URL :http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/
Filed Under:Technology
Posts on Regator:2951
Posts / Week:12.1
Archived Since:February 15, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Why Quantum "Clippers" Will Distribute Entanglement Across The Oceans

The best way to build a global quantum internet will use containerships to carry qubits across the oceans, say physicists.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending October 24, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending October 24, 2014)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review. In Conversation: Marc AndreessenThis Q&A with early Web pioneer turned vocal venture capitalist Marc Andreessen gives a sense for his provocative, if sometimes glib, thinking on technology. —Tom Simonite, San Francisco bureau chief

Data Mining Reveals How News Coverage Varies Around the World

Last year, the news media reported on 195,000 disasters around the world. The ones you heard about depend crucially on your location. One interesting question about the nature of news is how well it reflects the pattern of real events around the world. Show More Summary

Open Surveillance

Cryptography could keep electronic investigations under control. Democracy rests on the principle that legal processes must be open and public. Laws are created through open deliberation; anyone can read or challenge them; and in enforcing them the government must get a warrant before searching a person’s private property. Show More Summary

Algorithm Awareness

How the news feed on Facebook decides what you get to see. Increasingly, it is algorithms that choose which products to recommend to us and algorithms that decide whether we should receive a new credit card. But these algorithms are buried outside our perception. How does one begin to make sense of these mysterious hidden forces?

Requiem for an iPad Forced Into Retirement

When software updates force a functional gadget into retirement, it can be hard to say goodbye. Just a month after the company’s U2-studded announcement of the Apple Watch and new iPhones, Apple didn’t have much real news to trot out at an event at its Cupertino, California, headquarters today.

Are We Really Saving the Open Internet?

Want regulations to preserve the open Internet? Be careful what you wish for. Demands for network neutrality have reached fever pitch in Washington, D.C., as many voices stress the need for the Federal Communications Commission to save our open Internet. Show More Summary

Emerging Evidence Shows How Computer Messaging Helps Autistic Adults Communicate

Anecdotal reports suggest that autistic adults benefit from computer-based communication. Now the scientific evidence is building. The conventional view of people with autism is that they are loners with little interest in initiating or maintaining relationships with other people. Show More Summary

How An Intelligent Text Message Service Aims To Tackle Ebola In Western Africa

A computer-controlled text message service could direct Ebola cases to appropriate medical facilities and track the spread of the disease in the process–provided it can raise the necessary funding. Back in July, Cedric Moro started a crowdsourced mapping service to keep track of the spread of Ebola in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. Show More Summary

Other Interesting arXiv Papers (Week ending October 18, 2014)

The best of the rest from the Physics arXiv preprint server. Safeguarding Quantum Key Distribution through Detection Randomization

Apple's Quiet Attempt to Shake Up Wireless Carriers Could Benefit Us All

Apple’s SIM card that lets you switch wireless carriers on the fly could lead to cheaper communications. If you happened to pore over the details added to Apple’s website yesterday about its new iPads, you might have noticed that models with cellular capabilities include something interesting on the wireless front. Show More Summary

Urban "Fingerprints" Finally Reveal the Similarities (and Differences) Between American and European Cities

Travelers have long noticed that some American cities “feel” more European than others. Now physicists have discovered a way to measure the “fingerprint” of a city that captures this sense. Travel to any European city and the likelihood is that it will look and feel substantially different to modern American cities such as Los Angeles, San Diego, or Miami.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending October 18, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending October 18, 2014)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review. Will Ads Become Next Net-Neutrality Battle?An Israeli startup plans to help wireless carriers block online ads in an effort to negotiate a cut of Internet advertising revenues. —Tom Simonite, San Francisco bureau chief

Other Interesting arXiv Papers (Week ending October 11, 2014)

The best of the rest from the Physics arXiv preprint server. Avoiding Catastrophic Failure In Correlated Networks Of Networks

Inspired by Wikipedia, Social Scientists Create a Revolution in Online Surveys

Most of the information on Wikipedia comes from a tiny proportion of users. Now social scientists are collecting data in a similar way, allowing participants to design surveys as they contribute.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending October 11, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

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