Blog Profile / Technology Review Editors' Blog


URL :http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/
Filed Under:Technology
Posts on Regator:3129
Posts / Week:11.7
Archived Since:February 15, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Facebook AI Software Learns and Answers Questions

Software able to read a synopsis of Lord of the Rings and answer questions about it could beef up Facebook search. Facebook is working on artificial intelligence software that can process text and then answer questions about it. The effort could eventually lead to anything from better search on Facebook itself to more accurate and useful personal assistant software.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending March 28, 2015)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review. The Taming of Tech Criticism Evgeny Morozov points out the essential conservatism at the heart of most technology criticism. —Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

Physicists Describe New Class of Dyson Sphere

Physicists have overlooked an obvious place to search for shell-like structures constructed around stars by advanced civilizations to capture their energy.

An Emerging Science of Clickbait

Researchers are teasing apart the complex set of links between the virality of a Web story and the emotions it generates.

Spacecraft Traveling Close to Light Speed Should Be Visible With Current Technology, Say Engineers

Relativistic spacecraft must interact with the cosmic microwave background in a way that produces a unique light signature. And that means we should be able to spot any nearby, according to a new analysis.

Twitter Data Mining Reveals the Origins of Support for Islamic State

Studying the pre-Islamic State tweets of people who end up backing the organization paints a revealing picture of how support emerges, say computer scientists.

Other Interesting arXiv Papers (Week ending March 21, 2015)

The best of the rest from the Physics arXiv preprint server. “Roles For The Boys?” Mining Cast Lists For Gender And Role Distributions Over Time

Nanosheet Handler Heralds New Era of Diamond Age Devices

A simple way to pick up and place diamond nanosheets finally makes it possible to test this wonder material in a wide range of devices, say materials scientists.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending March 21, 2015)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review. People Who Use Firefox or Chrome Are Better Employees How awesome an employee are you? It depends on which Web browser you use. —Timothy Maher, managing editor

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending March 21, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Goodbye, Internet Explorer

Microsoft’s legendary browser is getting replaced. It’s about time. Microsoft is officially moving away from tired old Internet Explorer, in hopes that fresh code, and a new name, can help it gain back users lost to Google’s Chrome and Mozilla’s Firefox.

The Best Virtual-Reality Experience So Far

Game developer Valve has been working on its own virtual-reality hardware—and it’s more impressive than anything else I’ve tried. At last week’s Game Developers Conference, an annual gathering in San Francisco for the makers of video...Show More Summary

Data Mining Reveals When A Yellow Taxi Is Cheaper Than Uber

Computer scientists have compared a vast dataset of Yellow Taxi fares in New York City against Uber prices for the first time.

Other Interesting arXiv Papers (Week ending March 14, 2015)

The best of the rest from the Physics arXiv preprint server. Illusory Sense of Human Touch from a Warm and Soft Artificial Hand

Pagerank Algorithm Reveals World's All-Time Top Soccer Team

The network created by the results of teams playing each other can be ranked in the same way as websites, say computer scientists.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending March 14, 2015)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review. Exit Interview: Mathew IngramMathew Ingram, the media critic of GigaOm, does his exit interview with the Columbia Journalism Review after GigaOm suddenly folds. —Jason Pontin, editor in chief and publisher

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending March 14, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Astronomers Create 3-D Printed Model of Colliding Stellar Winds

Displaying the data from complex astrophysical simulations is always hard. So astronomers came up with a solution: they 3-D printed the data so they could hold it in their hands. In 1843, a relatively unknown star in the constellation of Carina in the southern hemisphere suddenly erupted becoming the second brightest star in the sky after Sirius. Show More Summary

Apple's Lovely, Potentially Overwhelming Wristwear

My admittedly short time trying the Apple Watch makes me wonder if it might be able to do too much. The Apple Watch looks and feels fantastic o n my wrist —unlike most smart watches I’ve tried, it’s not too big or heavy, it has a bright, crisp display, there are just two buttons for navigation, and its touch screen is incredibly responsive. Show More Summary

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