Blog Profile / Science & Health from Newser


URL :http://www.newser.com/section/6/science-health-news-headlines.html
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:3908
Posts / Week:14.6
Archived Since:March 4, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Archaeologists Uncover 'Mask Unlike Any Other'

An ancient god has resurfaced in Israel thanks to what archaeologists say is a one-of-a-kind discovery. University of Haifa researchers were digging at what's believed to be an ancient basalt armory outside Sussita—which the Jerusalem Post reports was once the Roman city of Antiochia Hippos—when a ball from...

New Theory: Stonehenge Was Really an Altar on Stilts

The mysterious origins of Stonehenge now have a new theory to add to the pile. Past speculations have included it being some sort of astronomical calendar, healing place, or Druid temple, and now a historian and art critic in the United Kingdom contends in a new book that the giant...

Vast Ocean Detected Inside Jupiter Moon

Where there is water, there could be life, NASA scientists say—and they have found evidence of a vast amount of water on Ganymede, Jupiter's biggest moon and the biggest moon in the solar system. Ganymede is the only one known to have its own magnetic field, and Hubble Space...

Why Dreams Fuel So Many Religions

Religions throughout the world—and throughout history—have put dreams at the center of their belief systems, and researchers say there's a good reason for that. We do much of our intense dreaming during REM sleep, when the highly active brain acts almost like it's awake, writes Ross Pomeroy at...

Fascist's DNA Rebuilt From 'Love Hanky'

Want to revive the DNA of a protofascist warrior poet? Just gather the man's semen from an old hanky gifted to a girlfriend and voila, you have the first DNA reconstructed without exhuming human remains. At least that's what forensic experts did in Italy with Gabriele d’Annunzio, the Guardian reports....

How a 'Last Hug' Revived Dying Baby

Kate and David Ogg held onto their dying baby five years ago as a way of saying goodbye, only to find him come miraculously back to life. Now the media has returned to see how the family in Queensland, Australia, is doing—and apparently they're happy raising three young children,...

Health Risks Predicted in 'Loneliness Epidemic'

Being a loner can ruin your health as much as obesity, say researchers. The new study out of Brigham Young University warns that loneliness and social isolation can affect longevity as severely as more common health risks, reports the Salt Lake Tribune. The effect is more pronounced among young people,...

Divers Solve Mystery of Upside-Down Shipwreck

The William B. Davock sank on what's been termed "the most disastrous day in the history of Lake Michigan shipping," but why the freighter and its 32 crew went down amidst 80mph winds and 30-foot waves has been a 75-year mystery. WZZM reports a sudden blizzard blew in on Nov....

Top Contender for Life Outside Earth: a Saturn Moon

Thanks to the Cassini spacecraft, we already knew that one of Saturn's moons has a big ocean. Now things have gotten more interesting on Enceladus. It turns out that the ocean is not only warm, it seems to have the same kind of hydrothermal activity going on as oceans on...

Owner Spends $750 on Surgeries for 2 Goldfish

With another doctor administering anesthetic and a nurse on hand to keep an eye on heart rates, the attending surgeon in a hospital in Scotland recently pulled off two complicated operations in the same day. The team's patients: a pair of pet goldfish who both had cancer, LiveScience reports. The...

Scientists Argue That 'Age of Man' Began in 1610

It may have been more than a century after Columbus sailed the ocean blue, but some scientists are arguing that 1610 marks a "golden spike" in the geologic record that kickstarted what is being called the Anthropocene era, or "Age of Man," and that this spike is the direct result...

Could Ultrasound Restore Memories After Alzheimer's?

Alzheimer's disease is currently marching through the brains of some 5 million Americans, eradicating vast swaths of memories in a seemingly irrecoverable assault on cognition. But what if those memories were recoverable, that devastating assault reversible? Scientists in the journal Science Translational Medicine think they have a solid shot at...

Scientists Unlock Key of Octopus's Blue Blood

Unlike human royalty, a species of octopus that thrives in frigid Antarctic waters has actual blue blood, and scientists think they've figured out its advantage: The key is a blue-hued protein called hemocyanin—which Phys.org notes is comparable to hemoglobin in vertebrates, and which distributes oxygen throughout the body—...

How Chameleons Really Change Their Color

Chameleons may not be the only creatures on the planet capable of shade shifting, but they're probably the best at it—panther chameleons in particular. They can go from green and blue hues to yellow and red ones in a matter of minutes, and scientists say they now think they...

Feds: Strong Quake Will Hit California in Next 30 Years

The latest US Geological Survey forecast for California doesn't contain much that will reassure people worried about earthquakes—unless they find fatalism reassuring. The report says there is not only a 99% chance of a 6.7 magnitude or greater quake like the 1994 Northridge one hitting the state in...

World's Oldest Mummies Are Turning to Jelly

For millennia, Chile's man-made Chinchorro mummies, the oldest in the world, have remained in roughly the same stable condition—the result of a sophisticated mummification process that dates back 7,000 years. Now, they're turning to "black ooze," LiveScience reports. Researchers say that over the last decade, some of the...

How Slave Skeletons Were Finally Traced to Their Home

Though upward of 12 million Africans were enslaved and shipped to the Americas between 1500 and 1850, tracing their roots back home has been famously difficult—with poor record-keeping and poorly-preserved DNA samples partly to blame. Now researchers from Stanford University and the University of Copenhagen report in the Proceedings...

Dangerous 'Microsleeps' Follow DST

Feeling groggy after the Daylight Saving Time switch? Scientists say you better watch out for "microsleeps," tiny lapses in attention that can create problems at work and accidents on the road, the Christian Science-Monitor reports. The microsleeps apparently account for extra car crashes and workplace injuries that follow our lost...

Mummified Climbers Found on Mexico's Tallest Peak

A team of climbers trekked some 17,000 feet up Mexico's Pico de Orizaba in search of one set of frozen, mummified remains only to stumble upon a second set some 400 feet away, reports the Telegraph. "It was impossible to conduct the rescue this time," says a local official;...

Van Gogh's Reds Aren't What They Used to Be

Look at a Van Gogh painting today, and you're not quite getting the full effect. Reports in 2013, as cited in the Guardian, revealed that the paintings were fading; studies have found yellows are turning brown. The color red is also posing a problem in works like Wheat Stack Under...

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