Blog Profile / Science & Health from Newser


URL :http://www.newser.com/section/6/science-health-news-headlines.html
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:5033
Posts / Week:15.1
Archived Since:March 4, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Lake Mead at Record Low

The surface level at Lake Mead has dropped as planned to historic low levels, and federal water managers say the vast Colorado River reservoir is expected to continue to shrink amid ongoing drought. The closely controlled lake shrunk Wednesday to its lowest point since the Hoover Dam was completed in...

Is the Movie Funny? Test of the Air Might Reveal All

Ever wondered if dogs can actually smell when you are afraid? New research published in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that humans emit certain chemical signatures that might be predictive of our emotions "by broadcasting scene specific emissions on breath." To test this, they studied the air in a movie...

Science Creates Cheap Dom Pérignon —Without the Grapes

Wine lovers may scoff, but a San Francisco start-up claims it can reproduce classic vintages without "grapes, yeast, or fermentation," City A.M. reports. “We can turn water into wine in 15 minutes," New Scientist quotes Ava Winery. Mardonn Chua and Alex Lee got the idea to make wine out...

How School Teaches Science: Jump-Roping With Cat Intestines

A "concerned whistleblower" blew long and hard by sending a video to PETA that showed a Texas high school class jumping rope with cat intestines—but the school district says it was all part of a lesson plan that wasn't meant to be cruel to animals, per KENS 5, and...

'Smirking' Porpoise About to Go Extinct

Fishermen are on the verge of eradicating a porpoise known for its little body and distinctive smirk—and only a massive effort by three world governments can save it, scientists say. The vaquita, also known as "little cow," was already the most endangered marine mammal on Earth. Now there are...

Mom's Voice Really Fires Up a Kid's Brain

Newborns can pick out their mother's voice in their first days of life, and while the stimulating sound of mom's voice has long been connected to the early emotional and social development of children, little is understood neurologically. Now researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...

Divers Find Roman-Era 'Trash' Saved by Shipwreck

A Roman-era treasure trove has been retrieved thanks to two strokes of luck. The first happened 1,600 years ago when a merchant ship carrying the statues and coins to be recycled sank in the ancient port of Caesarea in Israel. The second came last month when two divers discovered...

They Had Been Depressed for 18 Years. Then They Took Mushrooms

Far out. Researchers in the UK dosed 12 severely depressed volunteers with psilocybin—the active ingredient in magic mushrooms—and found it improved their condition for as long as three months, the Guardian reports. "That is pretty remarkable," one researcher tells Nature. The study—published Tuesday in Lancet Psychiatry —was...

Fishermen Slaughter One of the World's Largest Animals

People around the world have taken to social media to rant about the killing of a whale shark off the coast of China a couple weeks ago—and while two fishermen have been arrested after selling it at market, it's unclear whether they'll be punished, reports Fusion. The saga began...

We Read the Human Genome; Next Up, Writing It?

Scientists are contemplating a big follow-up to the Human Genome Project: Where that project essentially sought to read human DNA, this new endeavor would involve writing it. The idea, which is "spurring intrigue and concern in the life sciences community," as the New York Times reports, could enable scientists to...

Florida Divers Bring Up Signs of People 14K Years Ago

What divers found in a Florida sinkhole may help upend a long-held theory—that people first colonized the Americas thousands of years ago by crossing the Bering Strait, the Guardian reports. Scientists say that fossilized dung, mastodon bones, and stone knife discovered at the site near Tallahassee suggest people lived...

Egypt Accused of Hiding the Truth About Tut's Tomb

The curse of the pharaohs, or politics as usual? The controversy over supposed hidden chambers in King Tutankhamun's tomb has become even more complicated, with allegations that Egyptian officials are trying to suppress evidence that the chambers are not there after all. A radar scan last November by Japanese expert...

Preserved Fetus Is Likely Youngest Egyptian Mummy

A tiny coffin believed for a century to be holding the organs of some ancient Egyptian or other actually contains what is likely the youngest mummy ever discovered, Discovery reports. Archaeologists dug up the 17-inch coffin in Giza, Egypt, in 1907, and it was handed over to the Fitzwilliam Museum...

Scientists Spot a Trick to Help Erase Memories

There are plenty of people who might benefit from intentionally forgetting certain memories—those who've been in combat, or suffered some form of abuse, for instance, and consequently struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder. Now researchers at Dartmouth College report in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review that by creating a...

Germany Basically Had to Pay People to Use Electricity Sunday

Germany hit a new milestone in renewable energy on Sunday, generating so much power at one point that customers were essentially being paid to turn on their lights or charge their phones. Quartz reports that around 1pm Sunday, about 87% of the power being used in Germany was coming from...

Archaeologists Find World's Oldest Axe

Archaeologists in Australia have found a fragment of an axe far older than any other ever found, evidence that the continent's first Aboriginal people were considerably more sophisticated with tool making than they've been given credit for. "We are rewriting history here," Sydney University archaeologist Peter Hiscock tells the Sydney...

5 Pacific Islands Have Vanished

At 94, the leader of the Paurata tribe on Nararo Island has had to abandon his village. "The sea has started to come inland, it forced us to move up to the hilltop and rebuild our village there away from the sea," he says. Nararo is one of six islands...

Teen's Stellar Theory Leads to Lost Mayan City

William Gadoury has spent a fifth of his life researching the ancient Maya, and the 15-year-old's effort has just paid off in a big way. "I did not understand why the Maya built their cities away from rivers, on marginal lands and in the mountains," the Quebec teen tells the...

Tourist Shatters Historic Statue in 'Boneheaded' Selfie Attempt

Portugal's revered King Sebastiao, also known as the child king, was crowned as a 3-year-old when his grandfather died in 1557. His father, having died two weeks before his birth, never got to meet the near-mythical figure. And now, reports the International Business Times, tourists are being denied a view...

King Tut's Tomb Theory Is Suddenly in Doubt

Last August, British Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves put forth a theory that grabbed headlines around the world: that King Tutankhamun's tomb is adjacent to secret chambers that hold Queen Nefertiti's remains. A March news conference seemed to lend credence to the claim, with then-Antiquities Minister Mamdouh El-Damaty announcing that analysis of...

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC