Blog Profile / Science & Health from Newser


URL :http://www.newser.com/section/6/science-health-news-headlines.html
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:4863
Posts / Week:15.1
Archived Since:March 4, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Greenland Is Getting Darker Before Our Very Eyes

The white, reflective surface of Greenland's snowpack is getting darker and less reflective, all thanks to what the Christian Science Monitor calls "positive feedback loops"—the idea that a little bit of melting leads to more and faster melting. "We knew that these processes had been happening," says Columbia professor...

More Common Mosquito May Carry Zika Virus

The news about Zika virus just got a bit worse: Researchers in Brazil have found that a more common mosquito than previously thought can carry the virus, which may hamper efforts to stop its spread. The primary transmitter of Zika, which has been linked to birth defects and other maladies,...

At Ocean's Deepest Point, You Might Expect Silence. Not So

"You would think that the deepest part of the ocean would be one of the quietest places on Earth," says NOAA research oceanographer Robert Dziak, but it's not so. NOAA, with the help of partner scientists, recently listened in on the deepest point of the ocean and found what a...

Astronaut Scott Kelly Grew 2 Inches in Space

NASA will be studying how Scott Kelly's body reacted to almost a year in space, using his twin brother Mark Kelly, who stayed on Earth, as a control. One big difference to note right away: The brothers will no longer be the same height, as they were before Scott went...

Geographic Profiling Backs Theory on Identity of Banksy

His name is Robin Gunningham. That's the finding of British scientists who think they've confirmed the identity of Banksy using geographic profiling, the BBC reports. In the study published in the Journal of Spatial Science (one that was temporarily delayed by the artist's lawyers because he apparently didn't like the...

World's Longest-Distance Flier Is Identified

The world's longest-distance flier is a fly—a dragonfly to be exact. That's what scientists at Rutgers University-Newark claim in a new genetic study of Pantala flavescens, also known as the wandering glider, per Discovery News. Populations of the dragonfly, which is only 1.5 inches long, have been found...

Being Tired May Make You Snack Like a Pot Smoker

If you've wondered why you nosh like crazy after a night of tossing and turning, scientists think they've figured it out: Your brain may compensate for the lack of sleep by releasing chemicals similar to those that pot smokers breathe in, resulting in the tired person's version of the "munchies,...

Scott Kelly Returns to Earth

Astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth on Wednesday after an unprecedented year in space for NASA, landing in frozen Kazakhstan with a Russian cosmonaut who shared his whole space station journey. Their Soyuz capsule parachuted onto the central Asian steppes and ended a science-rich mission at the International Space Station...

Scientists Find Gene Linked to Gray Hair

Those unhappy with their gray hair now have to turn to a bottle of dye to cover it up, but a new study raises the possibility of being able to prevent hair from going gray in the first place. London researchers have identified a gene that causes hair to lose...

Chimps Are Inexplicably Hurling Rocks at Trees

Chimpanzees in West Africa are throwing rocks at trees, and why they're doing it remains a mystery, Discovery reports. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology say this chimp behavior has never before been documented and that it may shed some light on the species' cultural customs—and...

We'll Soon Know If Tut's Tomb Holds Secrets

First came the theory, then a dribble of updates: In August 2015, University of Arizona archaeologist Nicholas Reeves made the case that Tutankhamun's tomb also holds the remains of Nefertiti. Egyptian authorities had no comment at the time, but two months later, a duo of stories seemed to lend credence...

What Astronaut Scott Kelly Will Do as Soon as He Lands

Scott Kelly has been hurtling through the cosmos on the International Space Station for nearly a year (340 days to be exact—a record), but on Tuesday, the NASA astronaut and his partner, Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko, will finally head home. ScienceAlert has the emotional video of Kelly handing the...

Plankton Poop Could Now Do Harm Instead of Good

The amount of plastic in our oceans is now popping up as gigantic islands and set to outpace the global fish population by 2050. But it's also settling ever so slowly on the ocean floor in the form of plankton poop. And because plastic-laden poop is lighter and falls more...

Leap Year Doesn't Actually Happen Every 4 Years

Every four years, we get to celebrate leap year, with an extra day tacked onto the end of February to keep our calendar in sync with the solar year—the amount of time it takes for the Earth to revolve around the sun, or about 365.242159 days, per the...

Scientists Await Rare 'Dragon' Birth in Slovenia

When humans in the 15th century encountered olms—rare amphibians that have been roaming Earth's caves for 200 million years—they thought they were baby dragons. Today we know little more about the blind creatures than our ancestors did. Olms inhabit the cave rivers of the Balkans, grow up to...

Why a NASA Engineer Has Lived With 'Nagging Guilt'

Bob Ebeling, 89, has carried a terrible burden for 30 years. He was among several engineers who tried to stop the launch of the space shuttle Challenger, saying the booster rockets' rubber seals wouldn't seal correctly in cold weather. They were unsuccessful in their challenge to contractor Morton Thiokol, and...

Meet 'Earth's First Animal'

Way before humans, sharks, or dinosaurs, the sea sponge was very likely the first animal on Earth. That's according to a PNAS study out of MIT concluding that a molecule in 640-million-year-old rocks came from the simple creature. Assuming the researchers are right, that means the multi-celled organisms were around...

How Pretty Faces Affect Your Memory

Want to give your memory a boost? Trying gazing at a good-looking person of the opposite sex—if you're a man, at least. Recent studies show that guys who look briefly at an image of an attractive woman fare better in memory tests than men who gaze at more "average"...

Bees, Butterflies May Go Way of the Dinosaur

Don't care much about birds and bees going extinct? Then you may have to forgo popular foods (like blueberries, apples, and coffee) that depend on creatures that pollinate plants, the Christian Science Monitor reports. According to a UN scientific report approved by 124 nations, the coming extinction of pollinators such...

Wild Gorillas Make Up Songs While They Eat

Do you make happy sounds when you're eating a tasty meal? If so, you're not alone. Researchers have discovered that gorillas sing and hum while they eat, New Scientist reports, and the findings (published this month in PLOS One ) could provide insights into how language evolved in early humans....

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