Blog Profile / New Scientist: Space


URL :http://www.newscientist.com/section/space
Filed Under:Academics / Astronomy
Posts on Regator:1964
Posts / Week:3.8
Archived Since:February 24, 2008

Blog Post Archive

NASA insists it is going to Mars, but it really can’t afford to

The long-held desire to send humans to the Red Planet is nowhere near being realised, despite NASA claiming it is on a Journey to Mars

Google-sponsored private moon race delayed for the third time

Competitors in the Google Lunar X Prize now have until 31 March 2018 to land a spacecraft on the moon

Elon Musk shows off first photo of SpaceX space suit

SpaceX is planning to launch humans into orbit on board its Dragon capsule, and has designed new space suits for its passengers to wear

Exclusive: We may have detected a new kind of gravitational wave

Rumours are swirling of a new kind of gravitational wave, created by colliding neutrons stars, rather than black holes. Now Hubble has joined the hunt

‘Alien megastructure’ star may host Saturn-like exoplanet

Rather than being caused by extraterrestrial construction, the bizarre dimming of Tabby’s star could instead be due to a closely orbiting, ringed planet

I watched the eclipse with scientists hunting the sun’s secrets

Leah Crane joined solar researchers to watch yesterday’s eclipse, a rare chance to look at a scorching ring of space around the sun that we can almost never see

Solar eclipses: heaven-sent chance to mix art and science

To understand the sun at eclipse you need an artist's eye, finds Science Museum director Ian Blatchford

Bringing the Royal Observatory at Greenwich back to life

For the first time in 60 years astronomy could be reborn in one of its most iconic locations, the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London

America’s total eclipse: The best guides to how to prepare

We have always hunted meaning in total eclipses. As the US prepares for a total eclipse, four new books tell us all about them and remind us to enjoy them too

Win lunch with an astronaut

Apollo 15 astronaut Al Worden flew to the moon and holds two Guinness world records. Now you can have lunch with him in our exclusive competition

Great American Eclipse: Everything you need to know to get ready

The stage is set for the first total solar eclipse in the continental US since 1979. Here’s our guide to the best way to enjoy the spectacle

Speedy white dwarf may have survived a rare type of supernova

Type Iax supernovae are weak enough that part of the exploding star may be able to survive. Now, we may have spotted the first star that lived to tell the tale

Jellyfish galaxies may feed black holes with their long tendrils

Cosmic winds that form the long tentacles of jellyfish galaxies may also create the perfect conditions to sustain highly active supermassive black holes

Ice at Mars’s equator hints the planet was once much more tilted

Most of the water on Mars is at its poles, but ice near the equator may mean that the way the red planet is tilted has changed over the last few million years

Tethered satellites could see the moon’s weird swirls up close

The moon has bright coils of dust we can’t study without getting up close. A NASA proposal would send two satellites tied together to dangle over the surface

Moon’s magnetic field lasted twice as long as we thought it did

Lunar rock shows the moon’s magnetic field lasted a billion years longer than we thought, which may help us understand how planets keep their protective fields

Finding the first pulsar set my world spinning

Fifty years ago, Jocelyn Bell Burnell discovered a mysterious, pulsing radio signal – and the downsides of being a young woman in science

First exomoon might have been spotted 4000 light years away

Astronomers may have found the first exomoon around a distant planet, and have asked to use Hubble to confirm whether the tantalising hints are a real discovery

Half the atoms inside your body came from across the universe

Intergalactic winds carry gas and dust from one galaxy to the next, bringing half of the matter in our galaxy from up to a million light years away

Uranus’s crooked, messy magnetic field might open and shut daily

The off-kilter tumbling of the magnetic bubble around Uranus may regularly let a barrage of charged particles from the solar wind flow in

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