Blog Profile / One Per Cent


URL :http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/
Filed Under:Technology / Technology Industry News
Posts on Regator:1169
This blog is retired.
Archived Since:February 24, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Maths explains how pedestrians avoid bumping into one another

A model that takes into account sudden U-turns and other random behaviour by individuals in a crowd could be used to help prevent stampedes  

Enigmatic plumes from Saturn’s moon caused by cosmic collision

Saturn’s icy moon spews water and heat into space, but only from its south pole. A new model suggests that’s because it suffered a hit-and-run long ago

Edited live vaccine could stop harmful polio outbreaks

We’re on the brink of eradicating polio, but the virus used as a vaccine can evolve to become dangerous. Now a team has figured out how, and plan to stop it

Shock mass coral die-off in Asia sounds alarm for world’s reefs

An unexpected coral bleaching event in the South China Sea shows that reefs can heat up substantially more than the surrounding ocean

Robots are stronger, faster, more durable… and hackable

Some of today's best known robots turn out to be easily hijacked, a sign that this burgeoning tech industry must make security a top priority, says Paul Marks

Win a pair of signed books by Lawrence M. Krauss

Enter our competition and expand your knowledge of the universe with two books that ask why we're here - and where we're going

Quarter of California’s snowpack loss is from human-made warming

California’s reservoirs depend on the gradual melting of winter snow in the Sierra Nevada mountains, but the snowpack is dwindling and may not return

Tomorrow’s menu: Termites, grass and synthetic milk

The population is set to rise by 2.5 billion in three decades. We have plenty of ingenious ideas about how to keep us all fed, but will they be too tough to swallow?

On front line of climate change as Maldives fights rising seas

The Maldives government has decided not to abandon the sinking country and instead vowed to build new islands to keep the country – and economy – afloat

Sleep and dreaming: Where do our minds go at night?

We are beginning to understand how our brains shape our dreams, and why they contain such an eerie mixture of the familiar and the bizarre

Feedback: Keep the bloom of youth by sitting in an £18,000 vase

A personal "air bath" to steam out your wrinkles. Plus: unprintable names for a giant dish, multifunctional waters, and an unusual tool for an archaeologist

New autism blood test likely to join ranks of also-rans

A new blood test for autism promises to catch the condition much earlier than standard interventions. Here’s why it probably won’t change anything

Recoded organism paves way to new genetic language of life

A new technique has allowed a quicker way of recoding genetic information, which could allow us to design fresh life forms with useful properties from scratch

Chimp filmed cleaning a corpse’s teeth in a mortuary-like ritual

The never-before-seen behaviour suggests that chimpanzees can be curious about death and may shed light on the origins of human mortuary practices

Vision saved by first induced pluripotent stem cell treatment

A woman with age-related macular degeneration seems to have had her vision stabilised thanks to a transplant of retinal cells generated from her skin

Indian Ocean version of El Niño behind drought in East Africa

Like El Niño, the Indian Ocean dipole involves cyclical temperature changes in the ocean, and now millions face crop failures and famine partly as a result

Rear-view helmet vision may help avert motorbike accidents

A mini display that fits inside a motorcyclist's helmet shows a live video feed of the road behind, meaning less reliance on inconvenient mirrors

O my! Paper strip test determines blood type in just 30 seconds

When people can’t communicate their blood type, it can waste time in emergencies and put pressure on supplies of donor blood. A new test could change that

US charges Russian security officials over massive Yahoo hack

Two Russian security services officers and two alleged hackers have been charged over a Yahoo data breach that affected at least 500 million accounts

Fiddler crab’s drumming shows off the size of its home

Male fiddler crabs famously wave and drum their claws – but why? It seems the drumming is a sign to females of how big their bodies and burrow are

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