Blog Profile / Physorg: Other Sciences


URL :http://phys.org/science-news/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:2175
Posts / Week:6
Archived Since:April 9, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Fossils stolen from Death Valley National Park

Ancient fossil footprints have been stolen from Death Valley National Park.

When people know each other, cooperation is more likely than conflict

When anonymity between people is lifted, they more likely cooperate with each other. Playing nice can thereby become a winning strategy, an international team of scientists shows in a study to be published in Science Advances. The findings...Show More Summary

A decorated raven bone discovered in Crimea may provide insight into Neanderthal cognition

The cognitive abilities of Neanderthals are debated, but a raven bone fragment found at the Zaskalnaya VI (ZSK) site in Crimea features two notches that may have been made by Neanderthals intentionally to display a visually consistent...Show More Summary

Teacher encouragement has greatest influence on less advantaged children

Schoolchildren who receive words of encouragement from a teacher are significantly more likely to continue their education beyond the age of 16 than those who do not, a new study suggests.

Scientists predict reading ability from DNA alone

Researchers from King's College London have used a genetic scoring technique to predict reading performance throughout school years from DNA alone.

Measuring the impact of visitors, not just residents, on a city's crime rate

When a city district is said to have a "high crime rate," it's often assumed the criminals are "insiders," people who live in the area. But what if the criminals are actually outsiders, people who live somewhere else?

Lab opens at Egypt's pyramids to restore pharaonic boat

Egypt is inaugurating its largest on-site antiquities laboratory, to restore the second ceremonial boat of Pharaoh Cheops, known for building the largest of Egypt's iconic pyramids.

What motivates moral outrage?

When 109 travelers entering the United States were detained by an executive order blocking citizens from seven Muslim majority countries, tens of thousands of Americans gathered all over the country to voice their anger. The policy had little to no direct effect on the protesters themselves.

The seven deadly sins of statistical misinterpretation, and how to avoid them

Statistics is a useful tool for understanding the patterns in the world around us. But our intuition often lets us down when it comes to interpreting those patterns. In this series we look at some of the common mistakes we make and how to avoid them when thinking about statistics, probability and risk.

Measuring the subjective wellbeing of children in care

There are around 70,000 children and young people in care in England, mainly because of abuse and neglect. The impact of maltreatment can be long lasting and the quality of substitute care the child receives has a significant impact on their developmental recovery. Show More Summary

New, viable female politicians become role models for women, study finds

After Hillary Clinton became the presumptive Democratic nominee for president in June 2016—the first woman in American history nominated for president by a major political party—she tweeted a picture of her dancing with a young girl. The caption read, "To every little girl who dreams big: Yes, you can be anything you want—even president. Tonight is for you."

Products can be pals when you're lonely, but it may cost you, study finds

The Liberty Mutual commercial mentions naming your car Brad and considering him part of your family.

Iranians, engines of US university research, wait in limbo

Hundreds of Iranian students already accepted into U.S. graduate programs may not be able to come next fall because of the uncertainty surrounding President Donald Trump's proposed travel ban, potentially derailing research projects and leaving some science programs scrambling to find new students.

Our aging scientific workforce raises concerns

The science and engineering workforce in the United States is aging rapidly, according to a new study. And it is only going to get older in coming years.

Night lights, big data: Tool shows relationship between night-time lights and socio-economic factors

When the Earth is dark, human activity sparkles across the globe. As seen from space, night-time lights tell a story about how we live, correlating to everything from electricity consumption and CO2 emissions, to gross domestic product, population and poverty.

Impacts of school choice on segregation

Diversity in schools is important for students' experiences and outcomes in schools and beyond, reducing prejudices and ensuring the likelihood of living and working in integrated environments as adults. Penn State researchers are exploring how school choice is affecting racial composition and segregation in Pennsylvania schools.

Why don't Americans have a name for the color 'light blue?' Study finds unique color terms used in Japan, US

If a Japanese woman were to compliment a friend on her flattering pale-blue blouse, she'd probably employ a word with no English equivalent.

To be or not to be ... An entrepreneur

Today, more and more self-employed business owners may call themselves entrepreneurs, a label that connotes creativity, innovation, and success.

Class pervades the way migrants are viewed in Britain

In a poll of 25 countries by Ipsos MORI published in March 2017, 33% of those interviewed in Britain said immigration was their biggest worry. Although more British people overall were worried about healthcare, only Germans were more worried about immigration.

More compulsory math lessons do not encourage women to pursue STEM careers

The demand for employees in STEM careers (science, technology, engineering and math) is particularly high, as corporations compete to attract skilled professionals in the international market. What is known as "curriculum intensification"...Show More Summary

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