Blog Profile / Physorg: Other Sciences


URL :http://phys.org/science-news/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:3388
Posts / Week:8.7
Archived Since:April 9, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Mathematicians ask: What's in a ripple?

When a fluid or a gas experiences a sudden disturbance, such as a change in pressure or elevation, it often gives rise to a phenomenon known as an undular bore, which consists of a series of rapid oscillations that propagate and spr...

Solving the Easter Island population puzzle

Easter Island, known as Rapa Nui by its inhabitants, has been surrounded in mystery ever since the Europeans first landed in 1722. Early visitors estimated a population of just 1,500-3,000, which seemed at odds with the nearly nine hundred giant statues dotted around the Island. How did this small community construct, transport and erect these large rock figures?

Moods, but not depression, found contagious in adolescent social networks

New research suggests that both good and bad moods can be 'picked up' from friends, but depression can't.

Boys and girls in countries rich and poor enter teens with damaging gender stereotypes firmly set

Whether you are child in Baltimore, Beijing, Nairobi or New Delhi, the onset of adolescence triggers a surprisingly common set of rigidly enforced gender expectations that are linked to increased lifelong risks of everything from HIV and depression to violence and suicide. Show More Summary

Lumbering giants had agile ancestors

The best known sauropod dinosaurs were huge herbivorous creatures, whose brain structures were markedly different from those of their evolutionary predecessors, for the earliest representatives of the group were small, lithe carnivo...

Non-avian dinosaur found to have laid blue eggs

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers from Germany and the U.S. has found that a non-avian dinosaur living in what is now China laid colored eggs. In their paper published on the peer-reviewed site PeerJ, the team describes their study of the egg fossils and what their findings suggest about the evolution of colored eggs in modern birds.

Researcher explores learning habits of skateboarders

There's a common misconception that education must be a formal process that involves a content-based curriculum and teacher-led instruction. But learning takes place all around us and, many times, kids are their own teachers.

Research to help students overcome study roadblocks

New research is helping academics understand factors hindering students from achieving academic success in the transition from secondary school to university.

One-third of PhDs lose interest in academic careers, but not for lack of jobs

There are growing concerns that the challenges of landing a faculty job are discouraging young science and engineering Ph.D.s from pursuing careers in academia. The assumption is the majority aspire to a faculty career but drop out of the academic pipeline because there just aren't enough tenure-track jobs to go around.

What will become of English in a post-Brexit European Union?

How might the Brexit process affect the status of the English language within the European Union? Without Britain, will English even cease to be a language of the Union? A new article in World Englishes explores these questions.

Science denial not limited to political right

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, many claims have been made that science denial, particularly as it relates to climate change, is primarily a problem of the political right.

Political polarization? Don't blame the web, study says

Despite the popular narrative that the web is to blame for rising political polarization, a study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in polarization is greatest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media. Show More Summary

Mathematician and chronicler of political murders

Emil J. Gumbel's formulas are fundamental for extreme value theory. This statistical discipline describes extreme incidents, such as floods or storms. Little is known, however, that he was also a pioneer of modern data journalism, unveiling the patterns of political murder in the Weimar Republic. Show More Summary

Black, white or multicultural: Constructing race in two countries

A new study demonstrates the strong influence ancestry plays in Americans' interpretation of whether someone is black, white or multiracial, highlighting differences in the way race is socially constructed in the U.S. compared to other parts of the world.

Virtual reality breathes new life into African fossils, art and artefacts

Digital technology has become an integral part of our everyday lives. So it was only a matter of time before the ways people interact with the past and ancient artefacts in museum settings became digital, too.

300,000 women are missing from economics

Economics is an overwhelmingly male field; and the problem is not going away. Less than a third of economics students today are women. A pervasive myth about the missing women students in economics – about 300,000 of them in the US alone by our rough count – is that the problem is their poor maths skills. Show More Summary

Price-optimization method to increase online retailers' revenue, market share, and profit

How can online businesses leverage vast historical data, computational power, and sophisticated machine-learning techniques to quickly analyze and forecast demand, and to optimize pricing and increase revenue?

Study finds religious program advertising appeals mainly to fear

Christians and fundamentalists are a major section of American society, with influence in political, social and economic circles. Yet, little is known about how advertisers work to reach a fundamentalist population. A study from theShow More Summary

When it comes to social media, consumers trust each other, not big brands

It's well known that the vast majority of America's largest corporations use social media platforms to boost their brands, especially Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. But the precise link between consumers, social media, and shareholder value has gone largely unstudied—until now.

New resource traces lives of British convicts transported to Australia

Family historians, teachers, crime writers and academics can now follow the lives of people convicted and transported to Australia or imprisoned in Britain using a vast, free online resource, the Digital Panopticon website.

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