Blog Profile / Physorg: Other Sciences


URL :http://phys.org/science-news/
Filed Under:Academics / General Science
Posts on Regator:3812
Posts / Week:9.6
Archived Since:April 9, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Why rural coal families are less likely to divorce

Rural coal-mining families show resilience against divorce when faced with the economic downturns common in the industry, a new study suggests.

Ancient fish scales and vertebrate teeth share an embryonic origin

In biology, one long-running debate has teeth: whether ancient fish scales moved into the mouth with the origin of jaws, or if the tooth had its own evolutionary inception.

Materialists collect Facebook friends and spend more time on social media

If you're materialistic, you're likely to use Facebook more frequently and intensely. A new paper in Heliyon reveals that materialistic people see and treat their Facebook friends as "digital objects," and have significantly more friends than people who are less interested in possessions. Show More Summary

How emotional and economic abuse go hand-in-hand

People who have been in an abusive relationship often don't realise it until they've left it, so looking at the data on past relationships is the best way of getting a picture of how bad it can be. We find that emotional and economic abuse in relationships are often intertwined. People who insult and shame their partners will often also try to control their income and assets.

Hundreds of fossil tree specimens belong to a single species

Paleobotanist Menno Booi discovered that 250 previously described fossil tree species are objectively not distinguishable and belong to only one single species.

When women have access to family planning, income rises and poverty drops

When women were able to take control of planning how many children they would have, their futures—and that of their children's—looked a little brighter.

A sub-desert savannah spread across Madrid 14 million years ago

The Central Iberian Peninsula was characterised by an arid savanna during the middle Miocene, according to a study led by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) comparing mammal populations from different localities in Africa and South Asia with those that inhabited the Iberian central area 14 million years ago.

10 African Americans named Rhodes scholars, most ever

The latest group of U.S. Rhodes scholars includes 10 African Americans—the most ever in a single Rhodes class—as well as a transgender man and four students from colleges that had never had received the honor before.

Fotis Kafatos, distinguished Greek biologist, dies at 77

Fotis Kafatos, a Greek molecular biologist who had a distinguished academic career in both the United States and Europe and became the founding president of the European Research Council, has died. He was 77.

Museum seeks to convince Indians that toilets are not dirty

A throne with a built-in commode for a French monarch takes pride of place at a New Delhi museum trying to break taboos surrounding toilets in a country where such convenience remains a sensitive issue.

Panama's pre-Hispanic golden artifacts stored out of sight

Nine years ago, a trove of intricate gold artifacts were uncovered at a little-known archaeological site in Panama. The treasures dating from over 1,000 years ago included gold beads, strange ceramic pots, and chest plates engraved with delicate designs in forms such as a squid and human face.

Researchers use 3-D printers to turn century-old theory into complex schwarzites

Rice University engineers are using 3-D printers to turn structures that have until now existed primarily in theory into strong, light and durable materials with complex, repeating patterns.

Study finds high-pressure expectations lead to unethical behavior

It can happen in the branch office or the boardroom. Volkswagen did it to pass emissions tests. Wells-Fargo did it to squeeze more profits from their customers. Some school districts have it done it to boost their standardized test scores. Show More Summary

Research reveals gender inequity in tax and welfare systems

New research from The Australian National University (ANU) has provided the first in-depth look for 30 years at gender inequity Australia's tax and welfare systems, revealing the key factors contributing to Australia's gender pay ga...

Volunteers use 3-D imaging to map shipwrecks

Did you know there are over 600 shipwrecks in the Swan River and off the coast of WA? A group of volunteers in Perth have been working with the WA Museum since 1974 to help with mapping and inspecting them.

Study tackles the divide over NFL players' protests

Support for NFL players' protests during the national anthem divided sharply along racial lines in a new survey of college students by UT Dallas researchers.

New paper answers causation conundrum

In a new paper published in a special issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, SFI Professor Jessica Flack offers a practical answer to one of the most significant, and most confused questions in evolutionary biology—can higher levels of organization drive the behavior of lower-level components?

Grade inflation adds thousands to the cost of a family home

Grade inflation at English primary schools can increase the price of surrounding houses by up to £7,000, according to early research from economists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Millions, billions, trillions—how to make sense of numbers in the news

National discussions of crucial importance to ordinary citizens – such as funding for scientific and medical research, bailouts of financial institutions and the current Republican tax proposals – inevitably involve dollar figures in the millions, billions and trillions.

Study refutes theory linking cognition, genes and income

Researchers have cast doubt on a widely-held belief that connects family income with cognitive development, according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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