Blog Profile / LA Times: Movies


URL :http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/
Filed Under:Entertainment / Film
Posts on Regator:5092
Posts / Week:13.3
Archived Since:May 25, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Dance drama 'Polina' transcends its flat story through the magic of movement

“Polina,” a dance movie based on a graphic novel, reaches a gorgeous crescendo in its final sequence: The title character (screen newcomer Anastasia Shevtsova), having taken a few detours from her presumed career path in classical ballet, steps into the spotlight as a choreographer. The work she...

'The Layover' sets a low bar for bad-behavior comedy

The only thing possibly less pleasant than airport delays and cancellations is watching “The Layover.” Second-tier airline safety videos are more entertaining than this fourth-rate comedy. Flight attendants on Southwest’s less-traveled routes are far funnier than the cast here. Watching a lonely...

Run-of-the-mill horror film 'Temple' delivers the same old evil spirits

Simon Barrett’s scripts for Adam Wingard’s “You’re Next” and “The Guest” created two of the best genre releases this decade, but there’s no evidence of his fingerprints on “Temple.” Not only does this standard horror film from first-time director Michael Barrett (no relation) lack the writer’s...

From the archives: Saucer sorcery in Steven Spielberg's 'Close Encounters of the Third Kind'

“Close Encounters of the Third Kind” is being rereleased in a digitally remastered 4K edition of the director’s cut. This review was originally published Nov. 18, 1977. Charles Champlin was a former Times’ arts editor, film critic and columnist. Steven Spielberg’s “Close Encounters of the Third...

'The Nile Hilton Incident': Crime and corruption on the eve of revolution

The Cairo depicted in writer-director Tarik Saleh’s “Nile Hilton Incident,” a police thriller that unfolds in the weeks leading up to the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, is as ready-made for big city noir as it is for a historic uprising. Streets teem with the desperate and unhappy; badges, money...

From the Archive: Greta Scacchi captivates in Merchant-Ivory-Jhabvala's 1983 India-set drama 'Heat and Dust'

“Heat and Dust” is being rereleased in a new 4K restoration. This review was originally published Nov. 9, 1983. Kevin Thomas reviewed films for The Times for nearly 50 years. “Heat and Dust” draws us into a treacherous, precarious world of vanished splendor, that of royal India under British rule...

'Jackals' may be derivative, but it still provides frights

Before director Kevin Greutert helmed “Saw VI” and “Jessabelle,” he was the editor on the terrific home-invasion thriller “The Strangers.” Greutert’s new horror film “Jackals” (written by Jared Rivet) feels disappointingly derivative of the movie he worked on a decade ago, but at least he knows...

Crime thriller 'Valley of Bones' wastes compelling premise

Although “Valley of Bones” features some potentially intriguing plot elements and a vivid backdrop, this earnest quasi-crime thriller, directed by Dan Glaser, takes too long to gain momentum and deliver the requisite action and suspense. Set (and largely shot) in the badlands of North Dakota, “Bones”...

Del Shores revisits cult comedy success with a very game cast in 'A Very Sordid Wedding'

“A Very Sordid Wedding,” Del Shores’ belated sequel to his 2000 cult-hit indie film “Sordid Lives” (based on his play, which also spawned a short-lived TV series), is as broad as the side of a barn but much more amusing. Fans of Shores’ Bible-toting-and-quoting — and now debunking — hodgepodge...

A prison-break classic is beautifully restored in Jacques Becker's 'Le Trou'

As long as men have been placed behind bars they've plotted to escape, and those plans have powered prison-break movies without end. But even in that large group, "Le Trou" stands apart. For one thing, made in 1960 and showing in a new 4K restoration at Laemmle's Ahrya Fine Arts in Beverly Hills,...

'Beside Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story' argues that British rocker deserves more credit for Ziggy Stardust success

The rock doc “Beside Bowie: The Mick Ronson Story,” directed by veteran rock ’n’ roll chronicler Jon Brewer, asks who was Ziggy Stardust without the Spiders From Mars? The answer the film arrives at is: probably not without Ronson, David Bowie’s lead guitarist in the early 1970s. A humble gardener...

'Viceroy's House' opens the door to a key era in India's past

“Viceroy’s House,” which largely succeeds in its attempt to present a comprehensive, yet efficient look at the 1947 partitioning of the British Indian Empire, proves a far more absorbing and thematically rich experience than its history-lesson trappings might imply. That said, there are so many...

Laughs abound in indie comedy 'Get Big'

Although much of what happens in “Get Big” feels borrowed from most every teen comedy from “Risky Business” to “Superbad,” this micro-budget effort from 23-year-old newbie writer-director Dylan Moran (who also stars), whips up plenty of humor and charm as well as several organic, well-served life...

Art-house hit 'Dawson City: Frozen Time' is back

Bill Morrison's virtually indescribable “Dawson City: Frozen Time” was a surprise Los Angeles art house hit when it debuted here in June, doing so well that it’s been brought back for a return engagement. Starting with the discovery of unknown films in Canada’s unforgiving Yukon Territory, director...

Divorce, French-style, in the gripping domestic drama 'After Love'

Like most divorcing couples, the duo at the center of Joachim Lafosse’s “After Love” are in a kind of limbo. But for Marie and Boris, played to riveting perfection by Bérénice Bejo and Cédric Kahn, that state of emotional in-between is intensified by a particular set of financial circumstances:...

Documentary 'California Typewriter' smartly recounts analog glory and contemporary passion for beloved machine

Doug Nichol’s documentary “California Typewriter” is a rich, thoughtful, meticulously crafted tapestry about the evolution of the beloved writing machine for purists, history buffs, collectors and others fighting to preserve or re-embrace analog life. The film, which first began as a brief look...

Lake Bell hits sophomore slump with marital comedy 'I Do ... Until I Don't'

Writer-director-actress Lake Bell’s directorial debut, “In a World …,” sparkled with a refreshing feistiness in its unapologetic take-down of gender inequality in Hollywood. Her follow-up film, “I Do … Until I Don’t,” which she also wrote, directed and stars in, might have taken a similarly voracious...

Hockey comedy 'Goon: Last of the Enforcers' is a zipless debut as director for Jay Baruchel

That old line “I went to a fight the other night and a hockey game broke out,” informs “Goon: Last of the Enforcers,” a raunchy, ploddingly unfunny comedy sequel to 2012’s equally crass but disarmingly endearing “Goon.” Seann William Scott once again takes to the ice as Doug Glatt, the low-key...

Oscar buzz to run high as the proudly low-key Telluride Film Festival gets underway

There will be no red carpets. No paparazzi. At 8,750 feet above sea level, even oxygen will be in relatively short supply. But when the 44th Telluride Film Festival kicks off Friday, scores of filmmakers, stars and movie executives will make their way to the isolated town in the mountains of Colorado,...

The angst-ridden doom and bloom of young Morrissey in 'England Is Mine'

Morrissey, lead singer of the Smiths, beloved cultural icon, the Pope of Mope, is a character built for a biopic, with his James Dean-inspired pompadour and earnestly morose lyrics born out of working-class ennui and teenage depression. Mark Gill’s debut feature, “England Is Mine,” tackles the...

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