Blog Profile / LA Times: Movies


URL :http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/
Filed Under:Entertainment / Film
Posts on Regator:4929
Posts / Week:13
Archived Since:May 25, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Two top Cinefamily leaders resign over anonymous allegations of sexual misconduct

Two leadership figures at Cinefamily, a prominent fixture in the Los Angeles repertory cinema scene, resigned Tuesday evening following a fast-escalating scandal alleging misconduct in and around the popular nonprofit theater on Fairfax Avenue. In an anonymous email that circulated widely online...

An American Cinemathque retrospective shines a light on the best and worst of Stephen King film adaptations

The massively popular novels and stories of Stephen King do not insist upon their own literariness. King’s mastery of orchestrated tension and emotional release — of story and character — is never undercut by an overly fussy sentence. When he’s firing on all cylinders, King is not just a commercial...

Jerry Lewis, the movies' mad and mercurial comic genius

Jerry Lewis didn’t just play a nutty professor. For years he reigned as a mad comic scientist of the screen — a brash innovator who exploded conventions and expectations on either side of the camera, and a take-no-prisoners farceur who mixed slapstick antics with a seething man-child persona of...

An appreciation: Jerry Lewis helped write the auteur's playbook

To many younger consumers of pop culture, Jerry Lewis? might seem like a cipher — a man praised nostalgically by older family members. Consider him the other guy (maybe) in relatively recent work such as the early ’80s Martin Scorsese movie "The King of Comedy"; or the punch line to a joke about...

New video: 'Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2' is less surprising but more visual than the first

New on Blu-ray “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” (Disney/Buena Vista DVD, $26.99; Blu-ray, $39.99; 4K, $44.98; also available on VOD) The interstellar superheroics of the original “Guardians of the Galaxy” become even brighter and zippier in the sequel, which puts Chris Pratt’s Peter “Star-Lord”...

Roman Polanski is denied latest request to unseal testimony in his statutory rape case

Roman Polanski has been denied his latest request to unseal testimony given by the original prosecutor in the filmmaker’s four-decade-old statutory rape case. In a ruling issued Friday afternoon, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon also denied Polanski his efforts to resolve the...

With 'Patti Cakes,' Cathy Moriarty is still aiming for authenticity

From "Raging Bull" to "Soapdish" and "Casper," identity formation is key to her career.

With 'Crown Heights,' ex-NFL player Nnamdi Asomugha is claiming space in Hollywood

Nnamdi Asomugha never thought he’d actually become an actor. Sure, like many young black boys growing up, there were two careers that captured his idea of success: on the field or court as a professional athlete or on stages and screens as a top-billed entertainer. But he was also the son of Nigerian...

The star vs. the producer: Mel Gibson movie called 'labor of love' imperiled over legal dispute

When it was first published in 1998, “The Professor and the Madman” by Simon Winchester was a book that seemed destined to become a prestige movie: it features a 19th century British setting, colorful characters and a story with cultural pedigree recounting the creation of the Oxford English Dictionary...

1987 revisited: Scribes, World War II through the eyes of babes and Mickey Rourke

It was the ’80s, so the films of 1987 naturally had big stars, big hair and big soundtracks. The year’s most popular movie, however improbably, was a remake of a French comedy, “Three Men and a Baby,” starring Steve Guttenberg, Tom Selleck and Ted Danson, and directed by Leonard Nimoy. It beat...

'Marjorie Prime,' 'Lemon,' 'Patti Cakes' and more movie picks for Aug. 18

Movie recommendations from critics Kenneth Turan, Justin Chang and other reviewers. Baby Driver Edgar Wright’s exuberant, one-of-a-kind vehicular-action-thriller-musical-romance stars Ansel Elgort as a tinnitus-afflicted, music-loving getaway driver alongside a superb supporting cast that includes...

Muddled sci-fi thriller 'What Happened to Monday' is still fun and has Noomi Rapace times seven

Anyone who already misses the clone-tastic science-fiction series “Orphan Black” may ease their suffering a bit with “What Happened to Monday,” a two-fisted futuristic thriller with Noomi Rapace playing seven lookalike siblings with differing personalities. The film isn’t as provocative as it means...

A glamorous Penélope Cruz can't transcend spotty comedy 'The Queen of Spain'

By turns sedate and breathless, the pitch-perfect 1950s newsreel footage that opens Fernando Trueba’s new comedy promises an intriguing mix of fiction and history. But though “The Queen of Spain” looks terrific and features a warm, glamorous performance by Penélope Cruz, that promise is fulfilled...

Soviet-set drama 'The Fencer' deftly mixes sports and politics

“The Fencer,” Finland’s official Academy Award entry for 2016, is an effective mix of underdog sports drama and political thriller, inspired by the true-life story of celebrated fencing champ Endel Nelis. The 1953-set film finds Estonian resister Endel (a finely understated Märt Avandi) forced...

Hostage drama '6 Days' proves duller than real-life

As Ben Affleck’s “Argo” effectively demonstrated, movies based on real-life events such as the 444-day Iran hostage crisis can be every bit as tensely unpredictable and thoroughly entertaining as their entirely fictional counterparts. The same, unfortunately, cannot be said for the considerably...

'Women Who Kill' is a fresh twist on indie comedy, romance and serial killers

Filled with a dry wit driven by its writer-director-star Ingrid Jungermann, “Women Who Kill” is a darkly comic indie that is a distinct product of its place and time. Its location is Park Slope in Brooklyn, and much of the drama takes place in a co-op grocery store, a quintessential neighborhood...

Justin Chon's drama 'Gook' revisits '92 L.A. riots with insight

As its wounded, defiant provocation of a title suggests, “Gook” looks head-on at racial animosity, American-style. Set on the first day of the 1992 Los Angeles riots, Justin Chon’s drama is uneven but bristling with life, and it offers a new perspective on a calamitous moment, one whose 25th anniversary...

California coastal drama 'Liza, Liza Skies Are Grey' is one long journey

A nostalgic look at first love on the open road in the ’60s, “Liza, Liza, Skies Are Grey” feels like the work of a first-time filmmaker, though it comes from veteran writer-director Terry Sanders. With a résumé primarily populated by documentary films, two-time Oscar winner Sanders might be forgiven...

‘Whitney: Can I Be Me?’ tells a familiar yet always tragic story of a singer gone too soon

The life and too-early death of singer Whitney Houston was a train wreck lots of people say they saw coming but no one was able to stop. Dead at age 48 in her Beverly Hilton hotel room, Houston was as celebrated as she was gifted, and as clips from the documentary "Whitney: Can I Be Me?" demonstrate,...

'Lycan' recycles werewolf and horror formulas with little payoff

An indistinct muddle of werewolf mythology, slasher formula and “teenagers in the woods” clichés, the horror pastiche “Lycan” might’ve been a passable picture if writer-director Bev Land had settled on what he was making. While its DIY spirit is admirable, this tedious shocker feels like it was...

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