Blog Profile / Conversational Reading


URL :http://conversationalreading.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Literature
Posts on Regator:1833
Posts / Week:3.7
Archived Since:March 2, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Quarterly Conversation Issue 49

We’ve just published Issue 49 of The Quarterly Conversation. Here are the contents: Features Louche Life: The Literary Crimes of Gary Indiana By Andrew Marzoni As the 24-hour news cycle exceeded Hollywood in narrative originality, the Menendez brothers became TV stars, O.J. got away with it, and California elected Arnold Schwarzenegger as its 38th governor Continue Reading

Ten Questions for Margaret Jull Costa on Fernando Pessoa’s The Book of Disquiet

The Portuguese modernist par excellence Fernando Pessoa remains an immense figure in world literature. Any significant new translation of his work is an event worthy of attention (all the more so because much of his writing remains unstransalted still). But what do you call it when his undisputed masterpiece is translated in a new, impeccably Continue Reading

28 Women Authors to Read This Year for Women in Translation Month

August is Women in Translation month. Here are a bunch of writers to enjoy. Add more suggestions in the comments, and share you reading on your favorite social network! And if you like this list, you should also check out my 22 Classic and Contemporary Female Latin American Authors to Read. Can Xue Leading Chinese Continue Reading

The Missing Books Version 2

The Missing Books Version 2 has just been released. The original The Missing Books was released in October of last year and was featured in Literary Hub, 3 Quarks Daily, the Los Angeles Review of Books, The Millions, and many others, as well as co-signed on Michiko Kakutani’s Twitter feed. You can read more about Continue Reading

Seven Questions for Lytton Smith on Tómas Jónsson, Bestseller by Guðbergur Bergsson

I’m doing a summer subscription drive. If you’ve found the content on this site valuable, make a small donation to sustain this website. The remarkable thing about literature in translation is that there can be an entire Ulysses just sitting around for decades, unknown until someone translates it—and boom, suddenly it exists in our world. Continue Reading

On Bolaño, Art, and Fascism

I’m doing a summer subscription drive. If you’ve found the content on this site valuable, make a small donation to sustain this website. It’s rather fitting the my column on the cultural roots of fascism in America comes out amid the latest cluster bombing of bombshells from President Trump—the latest being the currently evolving story Continue Reading

Strong Recommend: Empire of Things by Frank Trentmann

I’m doing a summer subscription drive. If you’ve found the content on this site valuable, make a small donation to sustain this website. I’m hoping to write a little more in-depth about this book down the line, but here’s a strong recommendation for Frank Trentmann’s Empire of Things. Basically, this is an extraordinarily thorough, compelling Continue Reading

Summer Pledge Drive

It’s that time where I ask you to pledge a few dollars if you like what you’re seeing at this site and at The Quarterly Conversation. To make things a little nicer, I’ll send over The Missing Books to anybody who donates $15 or more. This will include the original edition of TMB, plus all Continue Reading

Interesting New Books — July 2017

Here are some new releases I’ve got my eye on this month. As always, this list is taken from my Interesting New Books page, where you can find many more of the 2017 releases I’m watching out for. And you can follow me on Twitter for even more book recommendations. The Hour of Land: A Continue Reading

A Few Thoughts on Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled

Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled is set in 1864, three years into the Civil War, as a helpful subtitle instructs us at the beginning of the movie. The entirety of the film takes place at a secluded girls school in the Virginia wilderness, and there is a quality of Southern gothic here. This is one of Continue Reading

Translator Daniel Hahn on Winning the International Dublin Literary Award and Endowing a New Translation Award

I reached out to Daniel to find out more about this new award, why he donated his winnings, and what translators can do to break into the business. Below is our conversation.

Seven Questions for Lisa Dillman on Yuri Herrera and Andrés Barba

Lisa Dillman is the translator of one of the more celebrated authors to come along in English translation in recent years. I speak of course of Yuri Herrera, the author of the best-selling Signs Preceding the End of the World, as well as the two other books in a loose “trilogy” with Signs, The Transmigration Continue Reading

Quarterly Conversation Issue 48

Features The Rules of Attraction: On Roger Lewinter By Dorian Stuber Arriving in elegant, bilingual editions beautifully translated by Rachel Careau, The Attraction of Things and Story of Love in Solitude are the first two books by Roger Lewinter to be published in English. Although written in the 1980s, these works seem anything but dated. Continue Reading

Six Questions for Will Vanderhyden on Rodrigo Fresán’s The Invented Part

In addition to being one of the great up-and-coming translators of Spanish literature, Will Vanderhyden is also a good friend of mine. Going back to 2015, he had been telling me about an enormous translation of his from a very well-regarded Argentine, an author whose work I’ve wanted to read for some time. The author Continue Reading

On Gabo Conquering the World

My latest column is up at Lit Hub this week, “Why is One Hundred Years of Solitude Eternally Beloved?” I found this an interesting question to ponder, as One Hundred Years of Solitude turns 50 this year (apparently it happened right on May 30), and it has had astonishing success in terms of translation and Continue Reading

Recommended Reading: Berger, Herrera, Poetry via Robert Hass, Abstract Expressionism

Some things I’ve read and liked recently. A Little Book on Form by Robert Hass — For my full thoughts on this book you can just read my review in the San Francisco Chronicle. Here I’ll say that this book is equally an education in poetic form and in Hass’s remarkably, idiosyncratic literary mind. This is Continue Reading

Interesting New Releases — June 2017

Here are some new releases I’ve got my eye on this month. As always, this list is taken from my Interesting New Books page, where you can find many more of the 2017 releases I’m watching out for. And you can follow me on Twitter for even more book recommendations. This is Not a Border: Continue Reading

Some Thoughts on Anna Rose Holmer’s The Fits

Anna Rose Holmer’s directorial debut, The Fits (2015), is one of those movies wrapped around an impossible-not-to-speculate-about mystery that seems to destine it for cult status. Sitting comfortably between realism and allegory, the movie is negative capability at its finest. Show More Summary

Two Views of Richard Diebenkorn: From Figuration to Abstraction

In the spring of 2015 I was in London, where I had a few days to aimlessly stroll, browse the bookstores, and examine the world-class art that is all over the city (and still largely free, even in these austere times). One of the things I discovered entirely by accident was a retrospective of the Continue Reading

8 Questions for Jeffrey Angles on The Book of the Dead by Orikuchi Shinobu and the Yomiuri Prize

I recently received a mysterious and very fascinating book: The Book of the Dead by the great Japanese modernist Orikuchi Shinobu, published by University of Minnesota Press. Though written in the 1930s, this book is set in 8th-century Egypt, and it is a short, allegorical, surrealistic work, definitely one of the strangest and most striking Continue Reading

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