Blog Profile / Deep-Sea News


URL :http://deepseanews.com
Filed Under:Biology / Marine Biology
Posts on Regator:1298
Posts / Week:3.7
Archived Since:July 23, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Ocean Signs at the #MarchForScience

One of the beauties of the various marches for science around the world was scientists and science lovers really letting their inner science-punner out. Signs ran from the serious to the silly, but all carried a message of love for the oceans. I’m trying to collect as many as I can – so, please, post […]

We all Marched for Science

From sea to shining sea. Rebecca marched in Falmouth Jarrett marched in BostonCraig marched in New Orleans Douglas marched in Berkeley Douglas’s sign is a quote from the Life Aquatic Holly marched in Riverside Kim marched in Seattle Alex marched in spirit

Peak Poke? (Or, Our Choices Have Consequences)

One of my favorite urban myths is that at any point in time you are never more than six feet away from a rat.  Turns out that the reality is more like 164 feet away, but that’s just splitting rat hairs.  The point stands that where you find people, you find a lot of rats.  […]

On the Importance of Doing Science With Your Kids

I first met Kimberlee Leroux on a rare, rainy day on the beautiful Central Coast of California. We had both enrolled in a weeklong intensive course known as the California Naturalist Program. After dinner on the first night, all of the students, assorted ages and backgrounds, crowded around for introductions. As the circle made it’s […]

Remembering Dr. G. Richard Harbison

Walking into Richard Harbison’s office was like walking into a wizard’s house. There were jars upon jars of strange, beautiful, and grotesque creatures, big and small, floating in different colored liquids, packed all around the room. And the books! Oh my gosh the books. Towers of them. Teetering on the flimsy foundations of old manuscripts […]

The Writings on the Sea-Wall: Climate Science Alliance

As science communicators, we are constantly looking for new and innovative ways to translate the ramblings of the ivory tower into a relatable and accessible public dialogue. In my experience, our strongest ally in this endeavor lies in the artists, musicians, and storytellers within our communities. “The Writing on the Sea-Wall” series seeks to highlight the […]

The Return to Silent Spring

This is a guest post dually written by Nick Hayman and Dr. Violet Renick. Last week, EPA administrator Scott Pruitt denied the petition to ban chlorpyrifos, a highly noxious and widely used agricultural insecticide. Being acquainted with both of these scientist’s research on the deleterious environmental effects of chlorpyrifos, I asked them to fill our readers […]

If you love geophysical fluid dynamics, then you will love these foamy streaks in a lagoon

#Landsat8 saw fine, bright filaments on shallow, super salty #Garabogazkol yesterday.Bands of foam perhaps? This tweeter does not know. pic.twitter.com/ugSzIS5IGB — NASA Ocean (@NASAOcean) April 5, 2017 This is the point in class where I raise my hand, jump up and down in my seat, and yell “ME! ME! I KNOW THE ANSWER!” Yes, the filaments […]

Reason 5,879 why dolphins are a$$holes: Octopus “handling”

In case you needed further proof that dolphins really are the a$$holes of the ocean, we can now add even more evidence to this list. A new study by Sprogis et al. (2017) includes some pretty badass footage of dolphins “handling” an octopus. If dolphins weren’t such a$$holes, they would gently cradle the octopus like a kitten, stroking […]

The Ocean Lover’s Guide to Contacting Your Elected Officials

The last couple months have been a political and emotional cyclone. I, and I am sure many of you, have too frequently found ourselves enduring the spectrum of reactions from anger to fear to despair. What will become of our jobs? Our science? Our environment? Though I can’t predict the future, I do believe the […]

Bring the hammer.

Prepare yourself for the hammer. No not that hammer. This one. The Malleidae, or the hammer oysters, is a suite of around 30 species, primarily in the genus Malleus, all with a hammer or T shape to the shell.  I mean look at this shell. I like to think in the evolution process a conversation […]

The Writing on the Sea-Wall: High Water Line

As science communicators, we are constantly looking for new and innovative ways to translate the ramblings of the ivory tower into a relatable and accessible public dialogue. In my experience, our strongest ally in this endeavor lies in the artists, musicians, and storytellers within our communities. “The Writing on the Sea-Wall” series seeks to highlight the […]

#IAmSeaGrant

With the current administration attempting to torpedo NOAA’s incredible SeaGrant program, I’ve gotten into a reflective mood. One could highlight the tremendous return on investment of SeaGrant – 750% for every dollar spent. Or the thousands of people who have been employed (jobs!) off of SeaGrant. Or the reams and reams of awesome ocean science, […]

When Is An Internship Not An Internship?

An interesting discussion is playing out on NOAA Coral List regarding how we define “internships.” This got started after the Roatan Institute for Marine Science (RIMS) advertised their 4-week, $3000 (travel not included), summer “internship.” That sparked a lot push back from Coral Listers who complained (and I agree) that something a student PAYS for […]

Trolling in the deep: from raging rants to support of the strange

Today’s guest post is by Natasha Phillips, a marine biologist and PhD researcher based at Queen’s University Belfast, interested in the movement ecology, diet and energetics of ocean sunfishes (Twitter: @SunfishResearch, Blog: sunfishresearch.wordpress.com)...Show More Summary

Look at These Amazing Deep-Sea Creatures from the Remote Pacific Right Now

[View the story “Discovering the Deep: Exploring Remote Pacific Marine Protected Areas” on Storify]

How to recover when something goes very, very wrong at sea

No shit, Sherlock. A staggering achievement – fishing for a 2m thing in 5000m water with a 10,000m line … very, very well done. https://t.co/gvKiU23H9B — Sheldon Bacon (@sheldonbacon) March 10, 2017 I could not have said it better myself. Last weekend the wire cable that the ship’s CTD hangs from snapped, sending the entire […]

The Pulse of Ocean Data Archiving

Every morning, I wake up and check my email. Overnight, I get a few pings from mailing lists, people in other time zones, spammers – the usual. Lately, I’ve been waking up every morning to hundreds of new emails, and it’s inspiring. It’s cheering the dark bit of worry it my soul. It’s making me […]

The importance of being NOAA

Did you look at the weather before you left the house today? NOAA provided that data. Do you eat salmon, shellfish or even McDonald’s Filet-o-Fish? NOAA works with fisheries to manage these resources so you can eat safe seafood tonight and tomorrow too. Did you turn on the light in your house? NOAA provides the […]

Support LUMCON ocean scholarships, and get rural, low-income kids hooked on marine science!

How do we solve the diversity problem in marine science? This a complicated question without a single answer – but there is no question that we need to do everything we can to get all the young’uns hooked on science. It is especially important to make science accessible (and fun!) for underrepresented groups – African-Americans, Latinos, […]

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