Blog Profile / Monterey Bay Aquarium


URL :http://montereybayaquarium.tumblr.com/
Filed Under:Biology / Marine Biology
Posts on Regator:492
Posts / Week:1.7
Archived Since:July 23, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Did you know all of the animals at the Monterey Bay Aquarium eat...

Did you know all of the animals at the Monterey Bay Aquarium eat sustainably sourced seafood? You can too with our Seafood Watch app!   

We’re geeking out over the newest addition to our Tentacles...

We’re geeking out over the newest addition to our Tentacles exhibition: the striped pyjama squid! These shy cephalopods have never been displayed in the United States before. To make it happen, our aquarists figured out how to rear these...Show More Summary

Jellies are cnidarians—literally “stinging animals.” Using...

Jellies are cnidarians—literally “stinging animals.” Using nematocysts (Nuh-mah-toe-SIS-tss) tucked into cnidocytes (nye-doe-SIGHTs) triggered by cnidocils (nye-doe-SILLs), they’re equipped with specialized stingers that make quick work of their prey.

kqedscience: Creatures of Light Tonight’s NOVA: Creatures of...

kqedscience: Creatures of Light Tonight’s NOVA: Creatures of Light. How can deep sea bioluminescence change the human world? Watch tonight on KQED 9 at 9pm for Northern California folks, or check your local PBS listings.

Brittle stars bury themselves in the sand for protection,...

Brittle stars bury themselves in the sand for protection, leaving an arm or two free to snag food. Sometimes this attracts a hungry fish, but fortunately a brittle star can’t be tugged out by the arm. The arm snaps off, and a new one grows from the stump!

It’s the “Google of the Deep!” Check out the new...

WHAT IS THAT?! Explore the deep sea... ... and the amazing life therein! It’s the “Google of the Deep!” Check out the new online guide to deep-sea life from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI).  Now you can search for the wonderfully weird wildlife of the deep sea—and discover amazing animals like the vampire squid!

Happy Marine Mammal Monday! The gray whale migration is in full...

Happy Marine Mammal Monday! The gray whale migration is in full swing off our back decks. We were even treated this morning to a curious calf exploring the kelp (and scaring some surf scoters) on its coastal cruise to Baja Californi...

What’s kraken, baby octopus?

A juvenile two-spot octopus plays with pebbles in our Egg Lab Have you checked out the Egg Lab in our Tentacles exhibition lately? That’s where you can spot cephalopod eggs and recent hatchlings. Hatchlings like this itty bitty two-spot octopus! At just three-and-a-half-months old, it’s currently about the size of a walnut. Show More Summary

Join us this Saturday, January 30, from 7 to 9 p.m. for a...

Join us this Saturday, January 30, from 7 to 9 p.m. for a special Member’s Night! We couldn’t do our work without you—and this month we’d like to show you the incredible impact your dollars make for the ocean. We hope to see you her...

Some jellies commute 3,600 feet up and down in the ocean...

Some jellies commute 3,600 feet up and down in the ocean daily! You can watch brown sea nettles travel slightly shorter distances on our Jelly Cam:

Hey girl hey! Welcome African penguin Elizabeth to our exhibit!

Easy, breezy, beautiful… Feather Girl. Let’s put our wings together to welcome Elizabeth, our new African penguin! Named after Port Elizabeth in South Africa, she’s seven years old and came to us from the Knoxville Zoo.  “She’s a sweet bird. Show More Summary

Throwback Thursday: A tail of two buildings!

Whale would you look at that. When we first opened in 1984, visitors joined in the chase of an orca pod hunting a gray whale mother and calf in the rafters as they entered our building. With the addition of the Open Sea Wing in 1996 and the installation of a bridge between the two buildings, the sculptures were rearranged. Show More Summary

You’ve almost made it through another Hump(back) Day! Not...

You’ve almost made it through another Hump(back) Day! Not every whale is as lucky—judging by the scars on this whale’s tail, it has had a few close calls with an orca. So that’s one more thing to be thankful for today: at least you don’t have to dodge orcas on your way out of the office! Learn more about the wildlife off our back decks! Photo by staffer Emily Simpson.

Moon jellies go through many phases in their storied life—what...

Moon jellies go through many phases in their storied life—what we call the “jelly” is really just the adult “medusa” phase. From sexual reproduction to asexual cloning, moon jellies have a truly extraordinary lifecycle.

Jellies play many roles in the ocean ecosystem, from predator to...

Jellies play many roles in the ocean ecosystem, from predator to prey. They’re also prime real estate for open-ocean hitchhikers, including crabs, barnacles and fishes!

The beautiful purple-striped jelly is best appreciated from a...

The beautiful purple-striped jelly is best appreciated from a safe distance! Though not fatal, its sting can be painful. In spite of this, ocean sunfish have been seen munching on these jellies and are thought to be immune to their sting. Show More Summary

Anyone have peanut butter for that jelly? Jellies are more than...

Anyone have peanut butter for that jelly? Jellies are more than just pretty to look at—they’re heavyweights of the ocean ecosystem. Plentiful and potent, they’re powerful planktonic predators, as well as prey for numerous species—sometimes including anemones! Here a white-spotted rose anemone chows down on a drifting sea nettle.  Need more jelly? Check our our Jelly Cam. 

Ever wondered why pelicans often fly so close to the water?...

Ever wondered why pelicans often fly so close to the water? Doing so creates something pilots call the “ground effect” and makes flying almost effortless

Pelagic red crabs are a rare sight in Monterey Bay outside of...

Pelagic red crabs are a rare sight in Monterey Bay outside of El Nino years—but you can see these scarlet drifters any time you’d like with our latest wallpaper!

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