Blog Profile / Monterey Bay Aquarium


URL :http://montereybayaquarium.tumblr.com/
Filed Under:Biology / Marine Biology
Posts on Regator:1020
Posts / Week:3.2
Archived Since:July 23, 2010

Blog Post Archive

natureconservancy: Two sea otters backstroking across the...

natureconservancy: Two sea otters backstroking across the glassy surface of Elkhorn Slough between Santa Cruz and Monterey. Elkhorn is a seven mile long estuary and home to California’s densest population of sea otters. Read more from...Show More Summary

Beachcomber quiz! Q: How do you tell a sand dollar skeleton...

Beachcomber quiz!  Q: How do you tell a sand dollar skeleton (a.k.a. its test) from a living sand dollar?  A: A sand dollar test is white and smooth, while a live sand dollar is covered with tiny dark purple spines, so it’s fuzzy looking.  How about you, have you ever come across sand dollars or their tests before?

Caught a glimpse of a bottlenose dolphin pod race off our back...

Caught a glimpse of a bottlenose dolphin pod race off our back deck! (video: staffer Beth Scrutton)

pbsdigitalstudios: Conceived in the open sea, tiny...

pbsdigitalstudios: Conceived in the open sea, tiny spaceship-shaped sea urchin larvae search the vast ocean to find a home. After this incredible odyssey, they undergo one of the most remarkable (and a bit awkward) transformations in nature.  We’re urchin you to watch this video!

DYK our aviculturists play recordings of mother plovers...

DYK our aviculturists play recordings of mother plovers cheeping to coax eggs into hatching and to sooth orphaned plover chicks? Visit our blog for a behind the scenes look (and listen!) inside our wild bird rehabilitation center.

Say hello to Selka!

Hold on to your hearts, sea otter fans; Selka, our new resident sea otter has arrived! Selka AKA Otter 595 We first met Selka four years ago when she stranded in Cayucos, California as a one-week-old pup. Sea Otter Program staff responded...Show More Summary

the-dodo: Scientists Flip Out Over Shy Little Octopus These...

he-dodo: Scientists Flip Out Over Shy Little Octopus These scientists flip out every time they see an adorable animal, and they had the most hilarious reaction to this shy little octopus.

oceansoftheworld: (Photo 1/ Photo 2 - Yusran Abdul Rahman) Blue...

oceansoftheworld: (Photo 1/ Photo 2 - Yusran Abdul Rahman) Blue ringed octopus 

sciencefriday: The vaquita is one of the smallest, and rarest,...

sciencefriday: The vaquita is one of the smallest, and rarest, cetacean species. The diminutive porpoise is native to the northern part of the Gulf of California. Scientists estimate that only 60 individuals remain in the wild. What’s driving down the population? Nets cast by poachers searching for an endangered fish—the totoaba. Show More Summary

typhlonectes: Check this amazing octopus out! This summer,...

yphlonectes: Check this amazing octopus out! This summer, we’ve teamed up with Nautilus Live o explore many of our West Coast national marine sanctuaries. Recently, the Nautilus’ ROV spotted this deep sea octopus in Arguello Canyon near NOAA...Show More Summary

Take a morning dive into our Kelp Forest exhibit—and keep an eye out for some expert synchronized...

Take a morning dive into our Kelp Forest exhibit—and keep an eye out for some expert synchronized swimmers! Schooling fishes like anchovies are an integral part of the oceanic food web and flash their silver throughout the Aquarium.

ucresearch: How to speak listen to whales While we probably...

ucresearch: How to speak listen to whales While we probably can’t ever figure out how speak whale, we can learn to follow their speech and song as a way to track and study these majestic marine mammals.  At the Scripps Whale Acoustic...Show More Summary

First evidence birds nap in flight without dropping out of sky

First evidence birds nap in flight without dropping out of sky: mindblowingscience: The debate has finally been put to bed. Wearable brainwave recorders confirm that birds do indeed sleep while flying, but only for brief periods andShow More Summary

Spiny sand stars scour the seafloor incessantly for suitable sleeping spots and scrumptious sunken snacks.

Timelapse alert—Each second of this video represents 5 minutes in the life of these sea stars! The tube feet of sand stars don’t have suction cups like their reef-dwelling cousins. Instead, they walk on triangular tippy-toes to run swiftly (for a sea star) across the shifting bottom. Show More Summary

Sandbar sharks are easy to recognize thanks to their large...

Sandbar sharks are easy to recognize thanks to their large dorsal fins! Can you spot one on our Open Sea Cam?   Thank you to Instagrammer giamae07 for the jawsome photo!

mothernaturenetwork: Megan Lorenz’s award-winning Puffin...

mothernaturenetwork: Megan Lorenz’s award-winning Puffin Photography  “I would like to think he was a romantic puffin…” Megan Lorenz

Stick urchin up! A sea urchin’s mouth is home to Aristotle’s...

Stick urchin up! A sea urchin’s mouth is home to Aristotle’s lantern, a wonderful feeding apparatus complete with a complex set of jaws and five self-sharpening teeth. Food is brought to the urchin’s mouth and manipulated into position by rows of flexible tube feet. Show More Summary

All hail echinoderms! From tube feet to striking symmetry, the...

All hail echinoderms! From tube feet to striking symmetry, the unique structures of the “spiny skinned” animals make them the sea stars (and cucumbers and urchins) of the underwater world.

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