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Blog Profile / Literary Kicks


URL :http://www.litkicks.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Literature
Posts on Regator:1081
Posts / Week:3.1
Archived Since:March 2, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Sam Harris Almost Understands The Self

It’s easy to get angry when listening to Sam Harris, a stubborn young philosopher who recently made headlines for joining Bill Maher to condemn the entire religion of Islam on TV (Ben Affleck took the smarter side in this debate). Sam...Show More Summary

Wittgenstein's Searchlight

You may have heard about Wittgenstein's poker, or Wittgenstein's nephew or Wittgenstein's mistress...

D. G. Myers' Last Month on Earth

D. G. Myers, a celebrated literary critic, professor and blogger, died quietly of cancer in late September. For many like me who only knew D. G. Myers through his writings and online presence, his death was no surprise. We had read about...Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: From Chaos

The past week was a rough ride on the literary Internet. Friday brought the sudden death knell of HTMLGiant, a rollicking community website frequented by writers like Tao Lin, Zachary German, Megan Boyle, Noah Cicero, Marie Calloway and Blake Butler along with a wide cast of crazy characters. Show More Summary

International Encounters at the Brooklyn Book Festival

(I didn't make it to the Brooklyn Book Festival this year, but Tara Olmsted did, and here's her report! -- Levi) The Brooklyn Book Festival can be a mixed bag. At its worst the annual autumn event is complete chaos: no consistent theme, hot and crowded rooms, poorly moderated panels, no-show authors, smug hipsters as far as the eye can see. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: The Biggest Climate March In History

Nothing I can write today will be as relevant as an event that took place in New York City and various other places around the world today: the biggest climate march in history, attended by over 300,000 people. The Huffington Post has...Show More Summary

When Margaret Mitchell's Atlanta Burned, 150 Years Ago

If you only know the (great) movie version of Margaret Mitchell's novel Gone With The Wind, you might think Atlanta was burned in a day. But a city as big as Atlanta can't be burned down that easily. It took General Sherman's army nearly three months, from September 1864 to November, to reduce the entire city and railroad center to ashes. Show More Summary

Say My Name

I always wondered how I would react if I ever found somebody else using the "Litkicks" name. I can't see myself ever sending a "cease and desist" letter through a lawyer. That just wouldn't be my style, and it would betray the various vague but passionate stances I have taken as an artistic libertarian and copyright anarchist. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: The Buddhist Fable of Bob and Maureen McDonnell

I moved to northern Virginia in 2009. There were a few good surprises down here for this lifelong New Yorker, like the easy proximity of the thrilling Shenandoah mountains and rivers, and the rich, stark beauty of several Civil War battlefield...Show More Summary

Ken Kesey in 2014: Furthur Goes To Brooklyn

If you're on the east coast of the USA these days, you might catch a painted bus called Furthur running up and down the seaboard. This colorful vehicle is named after the original Furthur that took novelist Ken Kesey, Neal Cassady, Ken Babbs and the rest of the Merry Pranksters across the country on a famous road trip 50 years ago. Show More Summary

Don Carpenter's Last Laugh

Don Carpenter was a writer’s writer. Born in Berkeley, California in 1931, he grew up there and in Portland, Oregon, served in the Air Force during the Korean War, and returned to earn a B.S. from Portland State and an M.A. in creative writing from San Francisco State. In 1966 his first novel Hard Rain Falling was published to critical acclaim, and...

Philosophy Weekend: Occam's Razor in Iraq

What do we really know about ISIL, the rising insurgent group in Iraq whose violent methods have generated so much fear and anger around the world in the last few months? After violently establishing control of Sunni territories between...Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Occam's Razor

A few days ago, an African-American teenager was killed by a policeman for no apparent reason in a town called Ferguson on the outer edge of St. Louis, Missouri. As outraged citizens began protesting in the streets, the police made a...Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Nixon and Watergate and Vietnam and Our Capacity For Shared Delusion

"It was a lust for political power" - Bob Woodward "There is no simple answer" - John Dean President Richard Nixon, caught in a big lie, resigned in disgrace forty years ago. As we commemorate our shared memories of this astounding political...Show More Summary

Boyhood: Richard Linklater's Natural Cinema

In 2002, filmmaker Richard Linklater selected a six-year-old actor named Ellar Coltrane to be the star of his new movie Boyhood, which was expected to take twelve years to film. Linklater also cast seasoned actors Patricia Arquette and...Show More Summary

Transformation: The Strange 1925 Wizard of Oz Movie

"Wizard of Oz is on again", I noticed recently while flipping through my favorite classic movie channels. Then I spotted the year on the movie listing: 1925. Here it was, the early version I'd always been curious to see! This silent-era...Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: The New Schedule

If there's any part of Literary Kicks that I'm sure is going well as the site celebrates its celebrates its 20th birthday, it's Philosophy Weekend. These weekend essays consistently get the most enthusiastic feedback, the most comments, and the most Facebook/Twitter shares of all my blog posts. Show More Summary

Growing Up With Literary Kicks

(Literary Kicks is twenty years old today. This fact has left me speechless, so I asked Jamelah Earle to send some retrospective thoughts. -- Levi) When I was 16, I was on my high school forensics team. This was not in any way related to anything you might see on an episode of CSI, but instead was competitive speech and dramatic performance. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Because War is a Form of Language

It's because words are such effective tools of communication that we sometimes fairl to realize how often we communicate without them. A conversation is sometimes a physical exchange. These conversations carry meaning that can only exist in the physical realm. We signify to each other with words, with gestures, with emotional expressions. Show More Summary

Melanie and the Nickel Song

Sometimes shuffle mode on my iPhone really comes through for me. I was having a pretty bad day yesterday, and it found a song that cheered me up. I was having a bad day for a few different reasons. The biggest is something that's been going on for a while now. Show More Summary

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