Blog Profile / Literary Kicks

Filed Under:Academics / Literature
Posts on Regator:577
Posts / Week:1.4
Archived Since:March 2, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Philosophy Weekend: Recharging

I've got to recharge the old battery this weekend. Hope I don't get the red and black cables mixed up. Back to philosophy soon!

Roots That Clutch

What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man, You cannot say, or guess, for you know only A heap of broken images, where the sun beats, And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief, And the dry stone no sound of water. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Inspired by Mike Leigh

Every once in a while I find myself wondering why I run a blog series called Philosophy Weekend that doesn't necessarily resemble anybody else's idea of what philosophy is, and maybe also doesn't necessarily resemble anyone's idea of...Show More Summary

Gabriel Garcia Marquez and the Magdalena River

One Hundred Years of Solitude must be Gabriel Garcia Marquez's best title, and it's the book that made him famous all over the world. But I somehow neglected to finish that epic novel, and was more attracted instead to Love in the Time of Cholera...

Philosophy Weekend: The Turn

I didn't start a blog series called "Philosophy Weekend" so I could write the same old shit you've already read. That's what a lot of other philosophers and ethical theorists and historians seem to be good at. I don't know what their...Show More Summary

Litkicks Heads For Twenty

Sometimes I find it hard to believe that my blog is almost twenty years old. Well, sometimes I also find it hard to believe that my youngest daughter is almost twenty years old. (They were born the same year, and they both grew up so fast.) Literary Kicks will turn twenty on July 23, 2014. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Genocide and Drunk Driving and Causality

When we write about genocide, it's customary to descend into paroxysms of inexplicability. Jeffrey Herbst of Foreign Affairs magazine marked this month's 20th anniversary of the genocide in Rwanda with a typical display. "Despite the...Show More Summary

Updike on 43rd Street

A literary biography ought to possess a voice and attitude that reflects and complements the literary voice and attitude of its subject. Leon Edel's life of Henry James is prim and probing, with an energy that gradually accumulates into stately magnificence. Gerald Nicosia's biography of Jack Kerouac...

Philosophy Weekend: Can A Person Be Guilty Of Genocide?

One of many unforgettable moments in Philip Gourevitch's book about the 1994 Rwanda genocide We Wish to Inform You that Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families is the author's visit to Gitarama prison a year after the massacre. He finds a scene of incredible physical misery, though the sufferers barely complain. It's the suspected Hutu perpetrators...

The Mahabharata, the Ramayana and the Mystique of William Buck

I recently heard about a British Library project to reassemble and digitize a 17th century illustrated edition of the Ramayana, a classical Hindu epic. This sounds pretty cool, and it reminded me of a different edition of the Ramayana...Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Genocide is Not a Force of Nature

We speak of genocide as a problem from Hell, but we rarely speak of it as an ethical problem that can be solved. This suggests that we have ceased to think of genocide as a problem of human dimensions. We have become as superstitious about genocide as cave dwellers must have been about tornadoes and hurricanes: we see it as a rare force of nature,...

Double Negative by Ivan Vladislavic

As Double Negative by Ivan Vladislavic begins, a hapless 80s-era hipster in South Africa named Neville Lister is listing badly: Just when I started to learn something, I dropped out of university, although this makes it sound more decisive than it was. He works a brainless job, pretentiously puffs on a tobacco pipe, argues bitterly with his racist...

Philosophy Weekend: The Atrocity Cube

It's time to start putting some puzzle pieces together. Five weekends ago I began a project by suggesting that we try to analyze some tough ethical/historical problems with the methodology of a puzzle-solver, by which I meant that we...Show More Summary

A Rite of Spring

"The people dance passionately on the earth, sanctifying it and becoming one with it." -- Igor Stravinsky I'm sure it's a hipster affectation of mine: I try to listen to Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring every year when the Spring Equinox comes around. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Blood Alienation

What can we discover by analyzing the worst atrocities of modern history together, looking for patterns and common features? A whole lot, it turns out -- and we're just getting started. Last weekend we discussed the surprising fact that...Show More Summary

The Great Lost Rock Memoir: Inside Out by Nick Mason

It's because I respect musicians who bravely venture into the dark literary territory of autobiography that I am so fascinated by musical memoirs. It's also why I'm sometimes critical of them. I have high standards regarding what a good memoir should be. My standards are high but simple. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: A Society's Self-Regard

A huge realization came to me recently, as I immersed myself in books and old movies about the US Civil War. We all know that the Confederate nation that lost this bitter war was also soundly trounced by the judgement of history, since...Show More Summary

The Harriet Saga

It's probably the best tween book of the modern era; at least it's the best one I can think of. Well, hell, everybody loves Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh, which was published fifty years ago this year. The anniversary is already getting so much attention -- an event on March 15 at the 92nd Street Y on Harriet's own beloved Manhattan island...

Philosophy Weekend: Images of Ukraine

I've been trying to philosophize about the Ukranian crisis in real time. This is always hazardous. Last Saturday morning, February 22, I invited readers to look at six images representing the history of Ukraine and to suggest three more that help fill out the story we are trying to understand. Show More Summary

Why I Wrote "Light of the Diddicoy"

(Eamon Loingsigh is a New York City novelist who has written articles for Litkicks about Lautreamont, J. D. Salinger and Taylor Mead. His latest work is Light of the Diddicoy, and here's how this novel came to be.) First things first, I have no choice but to write. I am a writer. I write. I made a decision long ago that in my life I will either be a...

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