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Blog Profile / Literary Kicks


URL :http://www.litkicks.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Literature
Posts on Regator:1079
Posts / Week:3.1
Archived Since:March 2, 2008

Blog Post Archive

The Crisis of Book Cover Design

(Here's Toro!, who runs a book cover design website and has designed covers or posters for Werner Herzog, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu and John Kemmerly aka Grady Sedgwick, and shares here some of the lesser-known challenges and tribulations of his career. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Medea Benjamin Debates The President

The use of force must be seen as part of a larger discussion we need to have about a comprehensive counterterrorism strategy, because for all the focus on the use of force, force alone cannot make us safe. We cannot use force everywhere that a radical ideology takes root. Show More Summary

Our Tech/Lit Spaces

As hard as this is to believe, this summer will mark the 19th birthday of Literary Kicks. I really have no idea why I've been doing it this long. I once had a reason; I forgot it. I guess I'm still having fun, though sometimes it's hard...Show More Summary

Ray Manzarek

I saw Ray Manzarek, the keyboardist for the Doors who died today, at a poetry show with Michael McClure at the Bottom Line nightclub in New York City a few years ago. I was awestruck by both legends on that stage: McClure for being a...Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Seasons

I can't write a Philosophy Weekend blog post this weekend. I've been working too hard on some tech changes to the site that will finally launch on Tuesday or Wednesday... and I'm also too broken up about the final show of the final season...Show More Summary

How Baz Lurhmann's 'Great Gatsby' Surprised Me

The odds didn't look good for the new film version of The Great Gatsby this weekend, I thought, as I donned my plastic 3-D glasses and entered the dark theater. I wasn't expecting to like the movie much at all. I don't love glitzy Hollywood spectacle, though I was willing to give the much-hyped new version of F. Show More Summary

Taylor Mead: A Bowery Glimpse

Droopy eyes under the hat. An old, creepy looking man leaning on the bar, crouching like a frail spider among a few smarmy-dressed women. The 50-ish ladies sneered at me when I wandered in off Bleecker and Houston streets on a Tuesday afternoon, but the spider just squiggled his mouth in a thoughtful glance toward me. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Kierkegaard's Either-Or

The great Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard never married, but he anguished for years over the existential personal puzzle of love and marriage, and transformed the question into a revolutionary book, Either-Or, published anonymously as Enten-Eller in 1943. This debut work immediately captivated readers, and would turn out to be not only his...

Fitzgerald's Lost Souls, or the Infernal Gatsby

If you're trying to analyze F. Scott Fitzgerald's jazz age novel The Great Gatsby and you're not thinking about Dante's Inferno, you're missing an obvious connection. The connection is easy to spot and hard to dispute, though it rarely comes up in discussion of the book. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Kierkegaard's Birthday

What do you buy a morose Danish philosopher who invented Existentialism for his 200th birthday? It doesn't really matter anymore, since Soren Aabye Kierkegaard is dead. He died at the young age of 42, already at this time a mostly broken man, an obsessive writer, a lonely bachelor, and a frequent subject of popular ridicule. Show More Summary

April 1993: CERN Opens the Web

All this spring and summer, we'll be hovering over the 20th anniversary of the World Wide Web's breakthrough into mass popularity. This week presents another possible "birthday" date for the WWW craze: it was on April 30, 1993 that CERN...Show More Summary

The Vortex: Beats and Rock and Punk

Two excellent new books remind me of the vortex of interests that's always coursed beneath the surface here at Litkicks -- a vortex, in fact, that is central to the literary/artistic sensibility that has fascinated and informed me through my whole life. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Derek Jarman's Ludwig Wittgenstein

I don't have much of a Philosophy Weekend post for you this weekend. I'm working on some technical improvements to the website, and I'm also pondering some big themes for the next few weekends. But all I've got to show you today is a...Show More Summary

Jackson and Bukowski: Drunken Literature

Recently, I’ve been thinking about drunks. Specifically, I've been thinking about literature written by drunks and/or about drinking. The positive reaction to a piece on this topic called Ten Best Books by Drunks that I posted on Legs...Show More Summary

Huxley, De Quincey, Baudelaire, Bowles, Ginsberg, Burroughs: Literature of Substance

In his essay The Doors of Perception, Aldous Huxley describes his experiences after taking a dose of mescaline. At the end of the book, he makes this observation: That humanity at large will ever be able to dispense with Artificial Paradises seems very unlikely. Show More Summary

E. L. Konigsburg's Mixed-Up Files

E. L. Konigsburg, author of From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, has died at the age of 83. This book had the best concept of pretty much any children's novel I remember ever reading: two spirited tweens (12-year-old Claudia and 9-year-old Jamie) decide to run away from their boring posh suburban home and hide out in the Metropolitan...

Philosophy Weekend: Denial of Death

(A few months ago, I received an email from an Australian writer named Tim Hawken who had a few article ideas for Litkicks. I published his Kant on Beauty and Heidegger on Art, and it was only after this that Tim revealed to me that he was writing these pieces under the stress of a family health calamity. Show More Summary

Dusklands: Coetzee's Essential Debut Novel

Because the enigmatic South African novelist J. M. Coetzee's first novel Dusklands is out of print, I always figured the book must have been a weak start to a great career. Dusklands was published in 1974, years before Coetzee started hitting his powerful stride with The Life and Times of Michael K. Show More Summary

Philosophy Weekend: Can We Reinvent Our Money System?

There have been big headlines this week about an Internet phenomenon called Bitcoin. Bitcoin is an open source peer-to-peer virtual money system, unsupported by any government or bank or underground vault stacked with gold bars. It works on the basis of simplicity and transparency, and is backed only by the fact of its own existence. Show More Summary

The Clock Exploded: A Taste of Richard Hell

If proof is ever needed that some of our most talented creative geniuses keep a low profile, we only need to look to Richard Hell, an experimental poet, ex-punk star, novelist and now memoirist, who lives a humble but glorious life around downtown New York City and graces us with a new book every few years. Show More Summary

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