Blog Profile / Daylight Atheism


URL :http://www.daylightatheism.org/
Filed Under:Religion / Atheism
Posts on Regator:1089
Posts / Week:4.3
Archived Since:October 26, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Photo Sunday: Dark Sunrise

For us Americans and others who still rely on the antiquated agricultural ritual of Daylight Savings Time, we “spring forward” this weekend. For the next few weeks, we’ll be rising in the morning dark once again. But as discouraging as it is to lose an hour, it’s a welcome reminder that spring is on its [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Thank You For Riding Taggart Transcontinental

Atlas Shrugged, part II, chapter X Having heard the tramp’s conveniently about-to-be-relevant tale, Dagny drifts off to sleep, puzzling over what it might mean. When she wakes up, it’s to a sudden, disorienting silence: the train has stopped moving. The sweep of her hand pressed the light switch and the bell to summon the porter. [Read More...]

Neil deGrasse Tyson Shows Why Small-Minded Religious Fundamentalists Are Threatened by Wonders of Universe

This column originally appeared on AlterNet. Neil deGrasse Tyson’s new Cosmos series is a worthy reboot of Carl Sagan’s original. Following in Sagan’s footsteps, Tyson takes viewers on a voyage through the outer reaches of the solar system and beyond, showing how our sun is just one star out of a hundred billion in the [Read More...]

Bangladesh Is Killing Atheists

There’s horrific news from Bangladesh: the atheist activist and writer Dr. Avijit Roy was murdered on the street in Dhaka, hacked to death by two assailants wielding machetes as he left a book fair at Dhaka University. His wife Rafida Ahmed Bonna was seriously wounded in the same attack. An Islamist group calling itself Ansar [Read More...]

I Get Religious Mail: If Wishes Were Airplanes

Most of the religious charity solicitation letters that I get have identifiable humanitarian aims, as much as I might disagree with the religious message those aims are wrapped up in. But that isn’t the case for the latest specimen, which begs for money to advance a purely religious mission, without even a pretense of serving [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Sixteen Tons

Atlas Shrugged, part II, chapter X The tramp on Dagny’s train reveals how the mysterious meme “Who is John Galt?” came into being, and why he fears he might have been the one who started it: “Well, there was something that happened at that plant where I worked for twenty years. It was when the [Read More...]

Book Review: Smoke Gets In Your Eyes

Summary: Morbid, irreverent and funny, but a subtle and compassionate humanism runs throughout. Caitlin Doughty is a mortician, the creator of a popular YouTube series answering questions about the funeral industry, and the founder of...Show More Summary

What’s Behind the Appeal of ISIS?

Amidst the steady drumbeat of grim headlines in the Middle East, the trend I’ve been most concerned by is the strange drawing power of ISIS, also known as Islamic State or Daesh, the brutal extremist group rampaging through Iraq and Syria, capturing cities and committing horrendous acts of violence. ISIS seems to exert an almost [Read More...]

Weekend Coffee: February 22

• Oliver Sacks, the neurologist and science writer, has terminal cancer. Here, he writes a beautiful, elegiac, deeply humanist essay about confronting the prospect of death and what he intends to do with the time he has left. • This can’t end well: In response to the increasing threat of ISIS, which is drawing Muslim [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Hobo Sign

Atlas Shrugged, part II, chapter X Dagny is in a desperate race against time to reach Quentin Daniels, the physicist whose brain might save the world, if only she can persuade him to resume his work before it’s too late. So, naturally, she takes a transcontinental train that will take several days to get her [Read More...]

The Rebirth of Nullification in Alabama

The week after I spoke in Alabama, there was a happy milestone in this reddest of red states: a federal court ruling for marriage equality was set to take effect. Judge Callie V.S. Granade, a George W. Bush appointee, struck down a state ban on same-sex marriage, and the state’s request for a stay was [Read More...]

Thoughts on the Chapel Hill Shooting

I hope there’s a day when I won’t have to write about the latest mass murder in gun-crazed America, but today isn’t that day. This time, the tragedy took place in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where a young family – Yusor Mohamad Abu-Salha, her husband Deah Shaddy Barakat, and her sister Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, all [Read More...]

Weekend Bonus Music: Hard Believer

I was going to put up a Friday Night Music post, but I’ve been traveling this weekend and didn’t have the time. So, here’s a weekend bonus with two great songs. My post on First Aid Kit two weeks ago was popular, but as Jeremy Shaffer pointed out in the comments, they don’t just make [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Good Men Are Hard to Find

Atlas Shrugged, part II, chapter IX Dagny gets a letter from Quentin Daniels, the physicist she hired to work on reconstructing the motor. He tells her that he’s reached the end of his rope and that he intends to cease his efforts, because “I do not wish to work in a world that regards me [Read More...]

Anti-Vaccination Fever Rages On

After washing your hands, vaccination is probably the simplest and best medical advance in human history. But in spite of overwhelming evidence of its efficacy at preventing death and disease, irrational fearmongering is persuading people to skip shots for themselves and their children, and we’re now paying the price. In the U.S., 2014 was the [Read More...]

Four More Solutions to Twitter Harassment

The CEO of Twitter, Dick Costolo, made headlines last week when he admitted in a leaked memo that his service has a serious harassment problem which they’ve done a terrible job of dealing with: We suck at dealing with abuse and trolls on the platform and we’ve sucked at it for years. It’s no secret [Read More...]

Alabama Speaking Recap

This past weekend, I spoke at the University of South Alabama in Mobile, courtesy of the local Secular Student Alliance affiliate, SSA at USA. This was a milestone for me: the first time I’ve ever been invited to speak about atheism in the Deep South! Making a public case for atheism in Alabama may seem [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Kiss with a Fist

Atlas Shrugged, part II, chapter IX I’ve said this before, but it bears repeating: Hank Rearden is an awful human being. He’s jealous, possessive, self-centered and misogynist. He has a short fuse and a violent temper. He makes a point of never caring about anyone’s welfare but his own. He feels contempt and disgust for [Read More...]

A Christian vs. an Atheist: On God and Government, Part 10

This is part 10 of my “Think! Of God and Government” debate series with Christian author Andrew Murtagh. Read my latest post and Andrew’s reply. Hi Andrew, Well, this little conversation of ours is titled “Of God and Government”, after all, and so far we’ve focused more on the God part than on the government [Read More...]

Marriage Is Suffering and Suffering Is Good: A Catholic View

Last week, I wrote about the crushing burden of fear and guilt about sex that women labor under in Orthodox Judaism. Taught to fear pleasure, to shun knowledge and to regard their own bodies as sinful vessels, they often end up in loveless and unhappy marriages, trapped by religious rules that bar them from happiness [Read More...]

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC