Blog Profile / Daylight Atheism


URL :http://www.daylightatheism.org/
Filed Under:Religion / Atheism
Posts on Regator:1269
Posts / Week:4.2
Archived Since:October 26, 2010

Blog Post Archive

A Response to Cracked’s “5 Atheist Arguments Which Aren’t Helping Anyone”

I admit, I spend a lot of time browsing Cracked. From its origins as a comedy website about dick jokes, it’s grown into one of the most subversively intelligent and thoughtful sites on the internet, commenting not just on pop culture, but on politics, philosophy and religion. Among other things, they’ve published harrowing personal essays [Read More...]

Friday Night Music: Every Open Eye

I last wrote about Chvrches, the Scottish synthpop band with the name I can never type, two years ago. They’ve since released their sophomore album, Every Open Eye, which is excellent – bigger, more expansive, more optimistic than their debut. Here’s one of my favorites: Another standout is “Empty Threat“, a defiant anthem that’s hard [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: The Descent of Man

Atlas Shrugged, part III, chapter VII, The Speech John Galt is still talking. In this section of his doorstopper monologue, he lectures about Rand’s views on human nature: “Man’s mind is his basic tool of survival. Life is given to him, survival is not. His body is given to him, its sustenance is not. His [Read More...]

Book Review: The Illusion of God’s Presence

Summary: Not a new theory, but a new and strong case for an old theory, supplemented with up-to-date neurological evidence. Jack Wathey is a neuroscientist and computational biologist and the founder of Wathey Research, a scientific firm that focuses on problems like protein folding. His new book, The Illusion of God’s Presence, presents an answer [Read More...]

Jimmy Carter Is Better than the God He Worships

The world needs more statesmen like Jimmy Carter. Since his presidency, he’s been an unflagging advocate for human rights. Through his Carter Center, he’s worked to oversee fair elections, release political prisoners, and negotiate peace accords in conflict-torn regions like Haiti, North Korea, Palestine, South Sudan and Bosnia. Show More Summary

If You Won the Powerball

OK, I admit it: I bought a ticket for the Powerball lottery this weekend. After multiple drawings with no winner, the grand prize hit $800 million, and could surpass $1 billion before tonight’s drawing. I’d argue that it’s not totally irrational to play. At $2 a ticket and jackpot odds of 1 in 292 million, [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Author Filibuster

Atlas Shrugged, part III, chapter VII, The Speech A brief promo before we get to today’s post: I was on the Feminist Coffee Hour podcast to talk about Ayn Rand and gender roles in Objectivism. Check it out! (Full disclosure: one of the co-hosts happens to be the person I’m married to. There were also [Read More...]

The Invisible Threat of White Christian Terrorism

Just after New Year’s, a gang of self-proclaimed militia members led by two sons of Cliven Bundy (yes, that Cliven Bundy) announced that they’d seized a building in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. Ostensibly, this was a protest on behalf of two ranchers who’d been sentenced to prison for setting fires on federal [Read More...]

Turning the Corner on Climate Change

The future is bleak for Miami. Built on low-lying swampland, it’s one of the most vulnerable places on the planet as storms strengthen and seas rise. The city is already suffering from streets that flood at high tide and saltwater seeping into drinking wells. With just a few feet of sea-level rise, which may be [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Do Not Adjust Your Set

Atlas Shrugged, part III, chapter VII The morning after the riot at Rearden Steel, Dagny is woken out of a sound sleep by the insistent ringing of her doorbell (“She had worked at the office till four A.M. and had left word not to expect her till noon” – such shameful weakness! since when do [Read More...]

Threads of 2015

As the last hours of 2015 pass, it’s time to revisit the themes and ideas that I kept returning to over the year. These are the most significant: A Violent Year Paris suffered not one, but two atrocities. In January, there was a bloody terrorist attack on Charlie Hebdo, committed by fanatics who slaughtered artists [Read More...]

New on the Guardian: Loud Fear, Quiet Hope

In 2015, our attention was riveted by crisis, disaster and violence, and politicians flourished by pandering to bigotry and xenophobia. But behind these discouraging headlines, there’s a quiet trend of progress unobtrusively transforming the world. That’s the topic of my latest column in the Guardian, Buried in the darkness of 2015: the seeds of hope [Read More...]

Weekend Coffee: Reusable Rockets

The news was nearly overshadowed by Christmas, but Elon Musk’s SpaceX pulled off an incredible feat of technology this week: The company’s Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral to carry a set of communications satellites into orbit. While the second stage of the rocket delivered its payload, the initial booster stage turned around [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Fanfare for the Common Man

Atlas Shrugged, part III, chapter VI There’s a scene in this chapter that I’m going to pass over briefly. In it, Hank Rearden is invited to a conference in New York where a cabal of prominent looters proudly announce their Steel Unification Plan, in which every steel maker will be paid based on the number [Read More...]

Welcome Stranger: A Humanist Sermon

I’ve said in the past, and will have occasion to say again, that the world is slowly becoming a better place despite the tragedies and outrages that parade before our eyes. But just because the overall picture is brightening doesn’t mean that there aren’t real and lingering dark spots that ought to command our attention. [Read More...]

Open Thread: Star Wars

I saw The Force Awakens last night, and I have thoughts, so here’s an open thread to discuss the movie. Warning: spoilers ahead! As Lore Sjoberg once said, the best Star Wars will always be the one that reverts you to the wide-eyed 8-year-old you were when you saw it for the first time. By [Read More...]

Atlas Shrugged: Antiheroism

Atlas Shrugged, part III, chapter VI I’ve been contemplating the concept of the antihero in literature. It’s always struck me as an odd term. Just going by etymology, you’d think it meant the opposite of a hero, but it doesn’t. All it means is a different kind of hero – someone who has more obvious [Read More...]

Beware the Man Who Knows One Thing

OK, let me admit this first and get it out of the way: I used to be a big fan of Scott Adams. In the early 2000s, I regularly read Adams’ Dilbert strip and subscribed to his newsletter, “Dogbert’s New Ruling Class“. I signed up for the jokes, but in retrospect, what I overlooked was [Read More...]

Some Thoughts on Cultural Appropriation

This summer, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts staged a “Kimono Wednesdays” event where visitors were invited to don the traditional Japanese garb and pose with a Claude Monet painting of his wife wearing a kimono. But the museum was taken aback when protestors showed up in force, accusing the event of perpetuating dehumanizing “exotification” [Read More...]

Weekend Coffee: December 13

• An editorial on Charisma News accuses atheists of “the height of intolerance” for, basically, existing during the Christmas season. • Mormon Feminists on the Brink: The LDS church has a long record of fierce and diehard opposition to feminism. Their resistance to LGBT rights is well in line with the church’s reactionary history. • [Read More...]

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