Blog Profile / Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week


URL :http://svpow.wordpress.com
Filed Under:Biology / Paleontology
Posts on Regator:660
Posts / Week:2.9
Archived Since:November 17, 2010

Blog Post Archive

What are we going to call PLOS ONE-style peer-review?

When a paper goes for peer-review at PLOS ONE, the reviewers are told not to make any judgement about how important or sexy or “impacty” the paper is — to judge it only on methodical soundness. All papers that are judged sound are to be published without making guesses about which will and won’t improve […]

Why Mike is interested in Royal Society Open Science, and why Matt isn’t

Copied from an email exchange. Mike: Did we know about the Royal Society’s PLOS ONE-clone? http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/about I am in favour of this. I might well send them my next paper while the universal waiver is still in place. Matt: Did not know about it. Their post-waiver APC is insane. How can they possibly justify $1600? Mike: […]

Measure the thing you’re interested in

The REF (Research Excellence Framework) is a time-consuming exercise that UK universities have to go through every few years to assess and demonstrate the value of their research to the government; the way funding is allocated between universities is largely dependent on the results of the REF. The exercise is widely resented, in part because the processes […]

Live-blog: the Future of Scholarly Scientific Communication

I’m at the Royal Society today and tomorrow as part of the Future of Scholarly Scientific Communication conference. I’m making some notes for my own benefit, and I thought I might as well do them in the form of a blog-post, which I will continuously update, in case anyone else is interested. I stupidly didn’t make […]

Tutorial 4b: Saurischian vertebral laminae and fossae redux, by Adam Marsh

[Hi folks, Matt here. I’m just popping in to introduce this guest post by Adam Marsh (UT Austin page, LinkedIn, ResearchGate). Adam is a PhD student at UT Austin’s Jackson School of Geosciences, currently working for a semester as a Visiting Student Researcher at my old stomping ground, Berkeley’s UCMP.  Adam’s been working at Petrified Forest […]

How conveniently can you package your results?

A couple of weeks ago, Mike sent me a link to this interview with ecologist James O’Hanlon, who made this poster (borrowed from this post on O’Hanlon’s blog): We had a short email exchange which quickly converged on, “This would work well for some projects, but not for others.” That’s the same conclusion I came […]

Welcome back, Brontosaurus! And other first thoughts on Tschopp et al. (2015)

Today is a good day for sauropod science. Since we’re not getting this up until the afternoon, you’ve probably already seen that Emanuel Tschopp and colleagues have published a monstrous specimen-level phylogenetic analysis of Diplodocidae and, among other things, resurrected Brontosaurus as a valid genus. The paper is in PeerJ so you can read it for […]

Heaven protect us from a “UK National Licence”

This abomination — a proposal for a “UK National Licence” for open-access papers, making the available only in the UK, is not an April Fool joke. It’s a serious proposal, put forward by HEPI, the Higher Education Policy Institute, which styles itself “the UK’s only independent think tank devoted to higher education” (though I note […]

Pay Scientific Reports extra to bypass peer-review altogether

There’s been some concern over Scientific Reports‘ new scheme whereby authors submitting manuscripts can pay $750 to have them peer-reviewed more quickly. Some members of the editorial board have quit over this development, feeling that it’s unfair to authors who can’t pay. Myself, I feel it at least shows admirable audacity — NPG has found a way to […]

“PeerJ can’t possibly last because the numbers don’t add up.”

I had an email out of the blue this morning, from someone I’d not previously corresponded with, asking me an important question about PeerJ. I thought it was worth sharing the question, and its answer, more generally. So here it is. Do you have any insight into the PeerJ business model? When I try to […]

Baby box turtles, and the ghost of editors past

We adopted a couple of 6-week-old box turtles today. They are Three-Toed Box Turtles, Terrapene carolina triunguis, and they are insanely adorable. This one seemed oddly familiar…had I encountered it before?

You can predict how rabbits run by looking at their skulls (using this one weird trick!)

I have a new paper out today in PeerJ: “Ecological correlates to cranial morphology in leporids (Mammalia, Lagomorpha)”, with coauthors Brian Kraatz, Emma Sherratt, and Nick Bumacod. Get it free here. I know, I know, I have fallen from grace. First Aquilops, now rabbits. And, and…skulls! I know what you’re thinking: that maybe I’m not just […]

Zallinger’s “Age of Reptiles” mural at the Yale Peabody Museum

In 2012, Matt and I spent a week in New York, mostly working at the AMNH on “Apatosaurus” minimus and a few other specimens that caught our eye. But we were able to spend a day at the Yale Peabody Museum up in New Haven, Connecticut, to check out the caudal pneumaticity in the mounted […]

Here comes VAMP, a new open-access journal of vertebrate palaeontology

Just launched: a new open-access journal of vertebrate paleontology, brought to you by the University of Alberta, Canada! It’s called VAMP (Vertebrate Anatomy Morphology Palaeontology), and it charges no APC. Here’s a illustration from one of the two articles in its first issue. Show More Summary

Help us assemble all of the museum abbreviations

We have a new page on the sidebar – here – where we’re collecting as many museum abbreviations as possible, the idea being that you can copy and paste them into your papers to rapidly populate the ‘Museum Abbreviations’ section. I grabbed about 100 from my own previous papers and a handful of others, so […]

How big was ‘Huanghetitan’ ruyangensis? I mean, really?

I’ve been taking a long-overdue look at some of the recently-described giant sauropods from China, trying to sort out just how big they were. Not a new pursuit for me, just one I hadn’t been back to in a while. Also, I’m not trying to debunk anything about this animal – as far as I […]

Tutorial 29, Appendix B: good, bad, and ugly titles of Matt’s papers

Last October, Mike posted a tutorial on how to choose a paper title, then followed it up by evaluating the titles of his own papers. He invited me to do the same for my papers. I waited a few days to allow myself to forget Mike’s comments on our joint papers – not too hard […]

Dinosaur National Monument quarry map

The Carnegie Quarry, at Dinosaur National Monument, near Jensen, Utah, is arguably the most impressive dinosaur-fossil exhibit anywhere in the world — a covered, semi-excavated quarry that’s absolutely packed with big dinosaur fossils. It’s also notoriously difficult to photograph: too big to fit into a single photo, and with poor contrast between the bones and […]

Defensive use of the tail in monitors – and also sauropods?

One thing that I’ve never understood is why some people are skeptical about sauropods using their tails defensively, when lizards do this all the time. I’ve been digging through the literature on this for a current project, and there are some really great accounts out there, and by ‘great’ I mean ‘scary’. Here’s a key […]

A permanent home for the SVP’s Aetogate documents

It’s hard to believe it’s been nearly seven years since the “resolution”, if you want to call it that, of Aetogate, the aetosaur plagiarism-and-claim-jumping scandal. I was contacted privately today by someone wanting to know if I had copies of the SVP’s documents published in response to this. I didn’t — and the documents are […]

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC