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Blog Profile / Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week


URL :http://svpow.wordpress.com
Filed Under:Biology / Paleontology
Posts on Regator:662
Posts / Week:3.1
Archived Since:November 17, 2010

Blog Post Archive

My neck-cartilage angle paper is out!

Arriving as an early Christmas present, and coming in just a week before the end of what would otherwise have been a barren 2014, my paper Quantifying the effect of intervertebral cartilage on neutral posture in the necks of sauropod dinosaurs is out! You can read it on PeerJ (or download the PDF). Yes, that posture […]

My early Christmas present: a dead corn snake

A friend’s daughter owned a pet corn snake, and a hamster. About a month ago, the former got into the latter’s cage — and in a reversal of the usual course of such events, sustained some nasty injuries. As snakes often do, it struggled to recover, and the wound seems to have necrotised. This morning […]

My new paper on Haplocanthosaurus is out

Right on the heels of Aquilops last week, my paper with John Foster on the new specimen of Haplocanthosaurus from Snowmass, Colorado, was just published in Volumina Jurassica. I’ll have more to say about it later, but right now I am up against a deadline on a big project and I need to go work […]

Why I feel horrible about Nature‘s article-sharing initiative

I wrote last week that I can’t support Nature’s new broken-access initiative for two reasons: practically, I can’t rely on it; and philosophically I can’t abide work being done to reduce utility. More recently I read a post on Nature’s blog: Content sharing is not open access and why NPG is committed to both. It’s well worth reading: concise, […]

Aquilops in today’s LA Times

Hey, just a quick announcement this time: today’s LA Times has a nice little article on Aquilops on page A6. It’s also available online here. Good luck tracking down a hardcopy – our local Barnes & Noble doesn’t carry the LA Times (not sure which party that reflects worse on), and I got the last […]

How bigsmall was Aquilops?

If you’ve been reading around about Aquilops, you’ve probably seen it compared in size to a raven, a rabbit, or a cat. Where’d those comparisons come from? You’re about to find out. Back in April I ran some numbers to get a rough idea of the size of Aquilops, both for my own interest and […]

Reconstructing the skull of Aquilops

As I mentioned in my first post on Aquilops, I drew the skull reconstructions that appear in figure 6 of the paper (Farke et al. 2014). I’m writing this post to explain that process. We’ve blogged here before about the back-and-forth between paleontologists and artists when it comes to reconstructing and restoring extinct animals (example […]

Please welcome Aquilops americanus

Today sees the description of Aquilops americanus (“American eagle face”), a new basal neoceratopsian from the Cloverly Formation of Montana, by Andy Farke, Rich Cifelli, Des Maxwell, and myself, with life restorations by Brian Engh. The paper, which has just been published in PLOS ONE, is open access, so you can download it, read it, […]

On ReadCube, and Nature‘s give-away

It’s been a week since Nature announced what they are now calling “read-only sharing by subscribers” — a much more accurate title than the one they originally used on that piece, “Nature makes all articles free to view” [old link, which now redirects]. I didn’t want to leap straight in with a comment at the time, […]

Why no PDF of the Smith and Benson Rhomaleosaurus monograph? An open letter to the Palaeontographical Society

I have sent this message to David Loydell and Beris Cox, the editors of the Palaeontographical Society’s monograph series. Dear Palaeontographical Society, I was delighted to see that Adam Smith and Roger Benson’s new monograph on the...Show More Summary

Crocomodiles vs. Allimogators

I just got off a chat with Matt. Here is the whole thing, all but unedited, for your enjoyment. All you need to know is that my wife, Fiona, built a symphony, which Matt refers to as a boxomophone in tribute to Homer Simpson refering to Lisa’s instrument as a saxomophone. Mathew: Hey, how is Fiona’s […]

Open-access megajournals reduce the peer-review burden

Despite the flagrant trolling of its title, Nature‘s recent opinion-piece Open access is tiring out peer reviewers is mostly pretty good. But the implication that the rise of open-access journals has increased the aggregate burden of peer-review is flatly wrong, so I felt obliged to leave a comment explaining why. Here is that comment, promoted […]

Is publishing “just a button”?

Matt’s post yesterday was one of several posts on this blog that have alluded to Clay Shirky’s now-classic article How We Will Read [archived copy]. Here is the key passage that we keep coming back to: Publishing is not evolving. Publishing is going away. Because the word “publishing” means a cadre of professionals who are […]

The most important essay on scholarly publication this week

…is not actually about scholarly publication. It’s Steve Albini’s keynote address at Melbourne’s Face the Music conference. It’s about the music industry, and how the internet transformed it from a restrictive, top-down oligarchy that mostly benefited middlemen into a more open, level, vibrant ecosystem where artists can get worldwide exposure for free, and yet are […]

The freakily consistent colour palette of Wedel and Taylor (2013) on caudal pneumaticity

Back in 2013, when we were in the last stages of preparing our paper Caudal pneumaticity and pneumatic hiatuses in the sauropod dinosaurs Giraffatitan and Apatosaurus (Wedel and Taylor 2013b), I noticed that, purely by chance, all ten of the illustrations shared much the same limited colour palette: pale brows and blues (and of course black and […]

Crocodiles vs. elephants

I’ve been reading The Guinness Book of Animal Facts and Feats (Wood 1982) again. Here’s what he says on pages 98-99 about the strength of crocodiles, and what happens when they bite off more than they can chew. The strength of the crocodile is quite appalling. Deraniyalga (1939) mentions a crocodile in N. Australia which […]

Have De Gruyters enclosed previously open-access Bepress journals?

At the end of October, we published a short piece called CC-By documents cannot be re-enclosed if their publisher is acquired. In an interesting discussion in the comments, moominoid asked: Isn’t this what happened when DeGruyter acquired BEPress? And subsequently expanded: This is the announcement of the acquisition. If you visit the journals now, they are […]

How did the horrible Yale “Brontosaurus” skull come to be?

A while back, Ben Miller reminded me that when I posted about the old Yale “Brontosaurus” skull, I promised: So how did the YPM come to make such a monstrosity? What was it based on? Tune in next time for the surprising details! I told him at the time that I’d soon get around to writing a […]

We need clear policy on tweeting from academic conferences

When Susie Maidment presented her in-progress research at SVP in Berlin last week, someone came in late, missed her “no tweeting, please” request, and posted a screenshot of the new work (since deleted). On the back of that, Susie started an interesting thread in which it became apparent that people have very different assumptions. She, and Marc Jones, and […]

Is my new sauropod-neck cartilage paper “published”?

In a comment on the last post, Mark Robinson asked an important question: You linked to the preprint of your The neck of Barosaurus was not only longer but also wider than those of Diplodocus and other diplodocines submission – does this mean that it has not yet been formally published? As so often in these […]

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