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Blog Profile / Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week


URL :http://svpow.wordpress.com
Filed Under:Biology / Paleontology
Posts on Regator:650
Posts / Week:3.1
Archived Since:November 17, 2010

Blog Post Archive

Is publishing “just a button”?

Matt’s post yesterday was one of several posts on this blog that have alluded to Clay Shirky’s now-classic article How We Will Read [archived copy]. Here is the key passage that we keep coming back to: Publishing is not evolving. Publishing is going away. Because the word “publishing” means a cadre of professionals who are […]

The most important essay on scholarly publication this week

…is not actually about scholarly publication. It’s Steve Albini’s keynote address at Melbourne’s Face the Music conference. It’s about the music industry, and how the internet transformed it from a restrictive, top-down oligarchy that mostly benefited middlemen into a more open, level, vibrant ecosystem where artists can get worldwide exposure for free, and yet are […]

The freakily consistent colour palette of Wedel and Taylor (2013) on caudal pneumaticity

Back in 2013, when we were in the last stages of preparing our paper Caudal pneumaticity and pneumatic hiatuses in the sauropod dinosaurs Giraffatitan and Apatosaurus (Wedel and Taylor 2013b), I noticed that, purely by chance, all ten of the illustrations shared much the same limited colour palette: pale brows and blues (and of course black and […]

Crocodiles vs. elephants

I’ve been reading The Guinness Book of Animal Facts and Feats (Wood 1982) again. Here’s what he says on pages 98-99 about the strength of crocodiles, and what happens when they bite off more than they can chew. The strength of the crocodile is quite appalling. Deraniyalga (1939) mentions a crocodile in N. Australia which […]

Have De Gruyters enclosed previously open-access Bepress journals?

At the end of October, we published a short piece called CC-By documents cannot be re-enclosed if their publisher is acquired. In an interesting discussion in the comments, moominoid asked: Isn’t this what happened when DeGruyter acquired BEPress? And subsequently expanded: This is the announcement of the acquisition. If you visit the journals now, they are […]

How did the horrible Yale “Brontosaurus” skull come to be?

A while back, Ben Miller reminded me that when I posted about the old Yale “Brontosaurus” skull, I promised: So how did the YPM come to make such a monstrosity? What was it based on? Tune in next time for the surprising details! I told him at the time that I’d soon get around to writing a […]

We need clear policy on tweeting from academic conferences

When Susie Maidment presented her in-progress research at SVP in Berlin last week, someone came in late, missed her “no tweeting, please” request, and posted a screenshot of the new work (since deleted). On the back of that, Susie started an interesting thread in which it became apparent that people have very different assumptions. She, and Marc Jones, and […]

Is my new sauropod-neck cartilage paper “published”?

In a comment on the last post, Mark Robinson asked an important question: You linked to the preprint of your The neck of Barosaurus was not only longer but also wider than those of Diplodocus and other diplodocines submission – does this mean that it has not yet been formally published? As so often in these […]

Sauropods’ neutral neck postures were really weird

Last night, I submitted a paper for publication — for the first time since April 2013. I’d almost forgotten what it felt like. But, because we’re living in the Shiny Digital Future, you don’t have to wait till it’s been through review and formal publication to read it. I submitted to PeerJ, and at the […]

Necks Lie: the complete story

Just a quick post to link to all five (so far) installments of the “necks lie” series. I need this because I want to cite all the “necks lie” posts in a paper that I’ll shortly submit, and it seems better to cite a single page than four of them. Necks lie Necks lie, redux Sauropods still […]

CC-By documents cannot be re-enclosed if their publisher is acquired

Just a quick post today, to refute an incorrect idea about open access that has unfortunately been propagated from time to time. That is the idea that if (say) PLOS were acquired by a barrier-based publisher such as Taylor and Francis, then its papers could be hidden behind paywalls and effectively lost to the world. For example, […]

Publishers, where is the added value?

It’s nearly two years since Alexander Brown wrote Open access: why academic publishers still add value for the Guardian, in which he listed ways that he feels publishers make a contribution. I wrote a lengthy comment in response — long enough that it got truncated at 5000 characters and I had to post a second comment with the […]

Tutorial 29: how to choose a title for your paper

Over on his (excellent) Better Posters blog, Zen Faulks has been critiquing a poster on affective feedback. The full title of the poster is “Studying the effects of affective feedback in embodied tutors”. Among other points, Zen makes this one: As a browser, I often want a take home message. This isn’t helped by the weak title, […]

Here’s that wallaby-skull multiview you ordered

After the sheep skull ten days ago, here is Logan the wallaby in all his glory: As always, click through for the full-sized version (6833 × 5082).  

Interview with Open Access Nigeria

Last night, I did a Twitter interview with Open Access Nigeria (@OpenAccessNG). To make it easy to follow in real time, I created a list whose only members were me and OA Nigeria. But because Twitter lists posts in reverse order, and because each individual tweet is encumbered with so much chrome, it’s rather an […]

Tutorial 29, Appendix A: good, bad and ugly titles of Mike’s papers

In light of yesterday’s tutorial on choosing titles, here are the titles of all my own published papers (including co-authored ones), in chronological order, with my own sense of whether I’m happy with them now I look back. All the full references are on my publications page (along with the PDFs). I’ll mark the good ones […]

tiny brontosauruses

This arrived on my Facebook wall, courtesy of Raul Diaz. For a split second I really did think the one second from the right was an older-model Carnegie Brachiosaurus toy. I assume that, like me, you have people in your life that you don’t correspond with very often, and when you remember that they exist, […]

Here’s that sheep-skull multiview you ordered

Remember I picked up those three sheep skulls (and some other bones, including a complete neck) from a shallow pit in a field near where we live? Here is first first of the skulls, cleaned up and photographed in orthogonal views. It’s interesting to compare it to the pig skull from way back: Sheep and […]

I am now a “famous palaeontologist” … thanks to my antlers

Just over a year ago, in his write-up of the Edinburgh SVPCA, Matt included a photo of me standing in front of a Giant Irish Elk (Megaloceros), positioned so that the antlers seem to be growing out of my head. Matt finished his post with a background-free version of that photo, and commented: … so he […]

Things to Make and Do, Part 14: sheep skull

Just a quick photo-post today. A couple of months ago, walking around the fields near our house, I found a broad shallow pit with a lot of a sheep skeletal elements in it. I took my youngest son out on an expedition, and we rescued the good material. I’ve cleaned up the first two (of three) […]

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