Blog Profile / Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week


URL :http://svpow.wordpress.com
Filed Under:Biology / Paleontology
Posts on Regator:780
Posts / Week:2.6
Archived Since:November 17, 2010

Blog Post Archive

The unique artistic talents of Darren Naish: sauropods as agile, cursorial bipeds

Building on the pioneering work of Karbek (2002), Darren Naish (circa 2004) conceived a theory of sauropod locomotion that has not been as widely accepted as he might have hoped. Sadly, other projects captured Naish’s attention, and his interest in writing up his theory waned. All that now remains of this sadly unpublished work is this speculative life restoration: […]

Moral dimensions of Open, part 2: “the public paid for it, so the public should have access”

This is the third part of a series on the Moral Dimensions of Open, in preparation for the forthcoming OSI2016 meeting, where I’ll be in the Moral Dimensions group. [Part 0 laid the foundation by asking why this matters; and part 1 discussed the argument that price should be zero when marginal cost is zero.] […]

The unique artistic talents of Darren Naish: the whiplash tail of flagellicaudatan sauropods

Building on the pioneering work of Myhrvold and Currie (1997), Darren Naish (circa 2003) conceived a theory of sauropod defence that has not been as widely accepted as he might have hoped. Sadly, other projects captured Naish’s attention, and his interest in writing up his theory waned. All that now remains of this sadly unpublished work […]

Those sixteen issues of the Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology found a good home!

A couple of weeks ago, I said I was going to toss out my hardcopy issues of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology unless someone wanted them and was prepared to pay for shipping. The good news is that Andrew Stuck did want them. We got in touch and arranged shipping, and they arrived at his […]

Moral dimensions of Open, part 1: “marginal cost is zero, so price should be zero”

As I mentioned last time, I will be participating in the “Moral Dimensions of Open” working group at the forthcoming OSI2016 conference. Having laid out what I see as the foundational aspect of this discussion in part 0, I’d like to briefly survey some of the specific moral arguments in favour of Open — with […]

Badgers are better than cats

I wanted to do a three-way comparison between my carnivoran skulls, but I’m too impatient to wait till I’ve got the fox’s skull out of its head. So here are the two I have now: the badger (left) and the cat (right): (Both skulls appear with their first three cervicals.) As you can see, the […]

What would a Gold-OA world look like? Three issues briefly considered

What would the world look like if, as proposed by the Max Planck Institute, the scholarly world flipped from being dominated by subscriptions to Gold open access? I think there are three things to say. First, incentives. A concern is sometimes expressed that when publishers are paid per paper published, they will have an incentive to want more papers […]

Moral dimensions of Open, part 0: why this matters

From 19th-22nd April this year, it will be my privilege to participate in OSI2016, the first annual meeting of the Open Scholarship Initiative. (I do think this project could have come up with a name that has a different acronym: OSI was previously the Open Society Institute, which was instrumental in getting open access off the ground — not to mention […]

Mind you, it’s not all dead badgers in my kitchen

There’s also this: As Orson Welles is supposed to have said: My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people.

Defleshing a badger head: a pictorial guide

There’s no sense in decapitating a badger if you’re not going to make good use of the severed head. So here’s what I did with mine. First, a reminder of the state it was in after yesterday’s adventures: Ideally, I would have liked to skin the head — it would have made subsequent stages easier and […]

Happy Easter! I celebrated by decapitating a fox and a badger

Over the last couple of weeks, I’ve been fortunate enough to acquire two medium-sized native mammals, both roadkill specimens in good conditions: a fox and a badger: But I’ve found from bitter experience that prepping out the entire skeleton of good-sized animals like these is a lot of dirty smelly work. So I decided to make […]

The pheasant comes apart

A couple of weeks ago, I was given a pheasant, which I reduced to science and food. When we last saw it, it was down to a skinned and partially defleshed head/neck and feet. It’s been through a couple of defleshing rounds since then, and today I was able to take it fully apart: At the […]

Free to a good home: sixteen issues of the Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology

I’m trying to free some space in my office, and I’m going to let my run of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology go: It covers everything from 25(4) to volume 29(2) — a run from December 2005 to March 2009) — and also includes the lone issue 29(4) for December 2009 and the SVP meeting abstract volumes […]

Help me! How can I deflesh a tortoise?

I’ve been lucky enough to acquire another beautiful specimen. It arrived in a box (though not from Amazon, despite what the box itself might suggest): What’s inside? Can it be? It is! Now I’ve wanted a tortoise for a long time, because they are (Darren will back me up here) the freakiest of all tetrapods. […]

Populating the European Commission’s Open Science Policy Platform

The European Commission is putting together a Commission Expert Group to provide advice about the development and implementation of open science policy in Europe. It will be known as the Open Science Policy Platform (OSPP). This is potentially excellent news. The OSPP’s primary goal is to “advise the Commission on how to further develop and practically implement […]

Wild Proboscidea in Oklahoma

I’m just back from a 10-day research trip to Oklahoma. I’ll have more pictures to post soon, of all kinds of cool things. One of the most surprising and interesting things I discovered on the trip was Proboscidea – not the mammalian order of elephants and their relatives, but the genus of plants with wacky […]

Copying content is not the same as theft

This post shouldn’t need to be written, but apparently it does. In recent discussions of Sci-Hub, I still keep seeing people trot out idiot analogies where copying scientific papers is portrayed as the equivalent of stealing physical goods. A couple of examples: Mickey: You want a pair of shoes go to the shoe store and buy […]

SV-POW! on the road – Matt’s public lecture at the Oklahoma Museum of Natural History

Just a quick heads up for any SV-POW! readers within convenient striking distance of Norman, Oklahoma, this Wednesday, March 16. Like all of the lectures in the “Dinosaurs Past & Present” series at OMNH, this one is free to the public. I hope to see some of you there!

Thought-experiment #2: what will happen if Sci-Hub fails?

Yesterday we asked what will happen if Sci-Hub succeeds (by which I meant that it survives whatever legal challenges come its way, and continues to distribute copyrighted scholarly publications to anyone in the world at zero cost, ignoring the claims of that copyright). Now let’s think about what happens if it fails — that is, if it’s […]

Thought-experiment #1: what will happen if Sci-Hub succeeds?

Let’s think this through. Ignore for now the questions about Sci-Hub’s legality, and just consider the pragmatics. Imagine that it “succeeds” in that it survives whatever legal challenges come its way, and continues to distribute copyrighted scholarly publications to anyone in the world at zero cost, ignoring the claims of that copyright. Then what follows? Extreme […]

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