Blog Profile / Worthwhile Canadian Initiative


URL :http://worthwhile.typepad.com/worthwhile_canadian_initi/
Filed Under:Business & Finance / Economics
Posts on Regator:1480
Posts / Week:4.4
Archived Since:April 1, 2011

Blog Post Archive

Thinking about Costs and Benefits of Immigration

I find this a useful way to organise my thoughts about the costs and benefits of immigration. It may work for you too. I start out with a neutral benchmark, where immigration has neither costs nor benefits for the original...

Balancing Ontario's Budget...In 1875

We often long for simpler times and search for them in our not so distant past. As an economist that does public finance and economic history, the public accounts of the past can offer me an interesting diversion. Governments, at...

Upward-sloping Demand curves for Labour and Housing

I have a simple thought-experiment ("model") that helps me think about the relationship between: migration; planning restrictions; wages; and house prices (or rents). Assume all workers are identical, all houses are identical, and it's strictly one worker lives in one...

Hysteresis vs Full Recovery by creating a Boom?

Simon Wren-Lewis has an important post. Read it first. If he's right then what looks like hysteresis from the recession is due to deficient Aggregate Demand. But is he right? This post is my attempt to figure it out. I...

Overselling faded dreams?

The April, 2017, issue of Science has a paper by Chetty, Grusky, Hell, Hendren, Manduca, and Narang on "The Fading American Dream" (ungated here). The paper documents falling income mobility. In particular, Chetty et al claim that, "the fraction of...

Where did all the immigrants go? A fascinating puzzle with a mundane solution.

There are two ways of finding out how many immigrants there are in Canada. One is through administrative data, that is, by using landing records (the forms filled in when new immigrants arrive in Canada) to track immigrants. Another through...

Monetary Policy for a central bank with no balance sheet

How a central bank can do things with words. Imagine a central bank with no assets and no liabilities. It does not issue money. It does not buy or sell anything. It does not regulate the commercial banks. The only...

Add dentists to Millennials' list of victims

Diamonds. Napkins. Marriage. Relationships. Fashion. All are being killed by Millennials. Now it's the dental industry's turn. Millennials don't visit the dentist - at least not at the rates that their sweet and adorable younger siblings do, or at the...

Project Link update: Labour Force Survey, 1953-2017

I've updated and expanded the data archived on Project Link, my attempt to take the fragments of data published by Statistics Canada and piece them together into a coherent whole. In my post introducing Project Link, I made note of....

Understanding Softwood Lumber: Another View

As we move into the latest iteration of the ongoing softwood lumber dispute with the United States, I thought it might be useful to look at some data to see if any additional insight can be gained. The conventional wisdom...

Never mind the flatness, feel the length (of the observed Phillips Curve)

Sorry. It suddenly came to me this morning: a simple (and now blindingly obvious) way to reconcile an apparent contradiction in my own thoughts. As a lot of people in different countries have noticed, the observed Phillips Curve now looks...

Monopoly/monopsony power and hungriness for sales/purchases

This is actually about the minimum wage debate. And I'm more asking you a question than giving you my answer. Bear with me for a minute. You are a seller. You sell a good for money. You have some degree...

Equalising the twin markups in a monopolistically competitive macroeconomy

The first markup is the markup of Price over Marginal Cost, required for individual firms' profit-maximisation. This is related to the elasticity of an individual firm's demand curve. The formula is: P/MC = [1/(1-1/e)]. The second markup is the markup...

150 Years of Federal Consumption Taxation

In the run up to Canada Day and the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, here is another in a line of recent snapshots of the federal government – this time its consumption tax revenues. Why consumption taxes? Well, economists like...

A composition effect in earnings growth and education attainment levels in Canada

I came across this post by Mickey Kaus a while ago, on trends in US earnings broken down by education attainment levels. From about the mid-70s to the mid-90s, earnings growth diverged sharply: increasing strongly for those with high levels...

How to value Aboriginal language television programming

Aboriginal programming is one of Canada's most worthwhile initiatives, from the classic radio program Dead Dog Cafe to Nick Rowe's favourite show, Moosemeat and Marmalade. But what is it worth? If you were asked to do an economic impact assessment...

Quebec is a distinct society, parental leave edition

My colleague Jennifer Robson has recently published a study on parental leave for the Institute for Research on Public Policy. It provides a detailed comparison of parental leave in Quebec and the rest of Canada (ROC), and provides a number...

150 Years of Canadian National Defence Spending

Canada’s federal government is going to deliver a new defence policy that is expected to guide Canada’s military for the next generation. While in the works for months, it comes in the wake of President Donald Trump’s recent exhortation at...

Remembering Peter George

Peter James George (1941-2017) died at home April 27th after a short illness. His passing leaves a remarkable legacy as an economic historian and academic leader. Peter grew up in the Toronto Islands, graduated from the University of Toronto, took...

Job tenures and the gig economy

A few weeks ago, Alex Usher drew my attention to this post by the Pew Research Center, on job tenure patterns of 18-35 year-olds in the United States. The takeaway point was that, contrary to an oft-repeated narrative about the...

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