Blog Profile / Worthwhile Canadian Initiative


URL :http://worthwhile.typepad.com/worthwhile_canadian_initi/
Filed Under:Business & Finance / Economics
Posts on Regator:1467
Posts / Week:4.5
Archived Since:April 1, 2011

Blog Post Archive

150 Years of Federal Consumption Taxation

In the run up to Canada Day and the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation, here is another in a line of recent snapshots of the federal government – this time its consumption tax revenues. Why consumption taxes? Well, economists like...

A composition effect in earnings growth and education attainment levels in Canada

I came across this post by Mickey Kaus a while ago, on trends in US earnings broken down by education attainment levels. From about the mid-70s to the mid-90s, earnings growth diverged sharply: increasing strongly for those with high levels...

How to value Aboriginal language television programming

Aboriginal programming is one of Canada's most worthwhile initiatives, from the classic radio program Dead Dog Cafe to Nick Rowe's favourite show, Moosemeat and Marmalade. But what is it worth? If you were asked to do an economic impact assessment...

Quebec is a distinct society, parental leave edition

My colleague Jennifer Robson has recently published a study on parental leave for the Institute for Research on Public Policy. It provides a detailed comparison of parental leave in Quebec and the rest of Canada (ROC), and provides a number...

150 Years of Canadian National Defence Spending

Canada’s federal government is going to deliver a new defence policy that is expected to guide Canada’s military for the next generation. While in the works for months, it comes in the wake of President Donald Trump’s recent exhortation at...

Remembering Peter George

Peter James George (1941-2017) died at home April 27th after a short illness. His passing leaves a remarkable legacy as an economic historian and academic leader. Peter grew up in the Toronto Islands, graduated from the University of Toronto, took...

Job tenures and the gig economy

A few weeks ago, Alex Usher drew my attention to this post by the Pew Research Center, on job tenure patterns of 18-35 year-olds in the United States. The takeaway point was that, contrary to an oft-repeated narrative about the...

Five things that can help you get your conference submission accepted

Over the past few months, I've been putting together the program for the upcoming Canadian Economics Association meetings: http://economics.ca/2017/en/. It's a reasonable sized conference - this year we had almost 900 submissions - and quite a few papers were rejected....

Trade Wars: Then and Now

I've got a new op-ed in the Globe, arguing that, to pull away from the US, Canada must look to its immigrants. The first draft of that article was much longer, and begun with a long discussion of the Smoot-Hawley...

PhD Vouchers

Canadian universities have strong incentives to create PhD programs, and admit students into those programs. This is because provincial governments typically provide generous funds for each PhD student a university takes in. Also, PhD students are useful and cheap workers....

Statistics Canada's historical housing cost data is wrong

In the early 1960s, Canadian economic historian Marvin McInnis started digging through the Dominion Bureau of Statistics archives, looking for city-level information on rental prices. While there, he discovered something strange and disturbing: A prominent theme of my career has...

Milk is mind-bogglingly cheap.

The Canadian Cook Book was first published in 1923. My copy is the twentieth edition, published in 1949. It dates from the heyday of home economics, a time when scientific principles were being applied to domestic life. Recipes are mixed...

Should professors tell students exactly what they expect?

Imagine, for a moment, that students acquire valuable human capital during their time at university. Imagine that the grades on a student's transcript reflect his or her level of human capital. Imagine that, every term, a professor uses examinations, term...

A Very Brief History of Federal Cash Transfers: Canada 1867 to 2017

This is a post in celebration of Canada’s 150th and similar in time span to my previous one on housing supply and dwelling starts. Canada is a federation and a key feature of its operation is a system of intergovernmental...

High Wages encourage Innovation?

High wages increase the benefits of an innovation that increases labour productivity. The higher the wage, the bigger the benefits of saving an hour of labour to produce the same quantity of goods. But if that innovation itself requires labour...

L'affaire Potter

You are all, I think, familiar with the details of L'Affaire Potter, so I need not enumerate them here. If you aren't already familiar with this story, you probably don't care what I have to say about it, so you...

Old and New Keynesian Multipliers: Cross-Section and Time-Series

Suppose you had an economy where half the agents are "Hand-To-Mouth" and have a Marginal Propensity to Consume of one (Ct=Yt), and the other half are "Autonomous" and have a Marginal Propensity to Consume of zero (Ct=At where At is....

Real Interest on Reserves

A central bank issues currency and wants to target the price of apples in terms of that currency. So it opens an apple window, and posts a sign promising to buy or sell unlimited quantities of apples at $1 each....

We Are Adding Less to Housing Supply

Housing prices particularly in places like Toronto and Vancouver are still a big issue and what is driving them is the subject of debate. There is Josh Gordon’s recent policy paper, which places the main emphasis on demand side factors...

Federal Budgetary Comparisons: Canada and the United States

It is federal government budget season in both Canada and the United States and I thought it might be useful to provide a few visual comparisons on federal government finance for the two countries. While the expenditure responsibilities and composition...

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC