Blog Profile / Gulliver


URL :http://www.economist.com/blogs/gulliver
Filed Under:Lifestyle / Travel
Posts on Regator:1499
Posts / Week:4.2
Archived Since:April 18, 2011

Blog Post Archive

How Donald Trump’s immigration edict will affect American tourism

12 months agoLifestyle / Travel : Gulliver

THERE are many ways to look at Donald Trump’s decision to ban travellers from seven countries with predominantly Muslim populations. Whether Mr Trump's order is legal, moral or self-defeating has been discussed at length elsewhere on this site.

President Trump's infrastructure plans probably involve more tolls

12 months agoLifestyle / Travel : Gulliver

FOR business travellers trying to work out what the Donald Trump era will mean for them, one of president’s central campaign promises seemed to bode well: investing up to $1 trillion in American infrastructure.

American Airlines does away with seat-back entertainment

12 months agoLifestyle / Travel : Gulliver

IT IS becoming a dilemma for any airline ordering a new batch of planes: should it ask for entertainment screens to be fitted into the back of every seat? Most aviation watchers expect that the technology will become obsolete at some point in the coming years, as more people fly with their own devices. But it is not passé yet.

Britain starts to accept passport photos taken on mobile phones

12 months agoLifestyle / Travel : Gulliver

DESPITE what doting parents claim, babies are mostly generic-looking. It sometimes takes Gulliver an embarrassing length of time to pick out his own child in old baby-group photos. He certainly wouldn’t recognise her from her passport picture aged four months.

Korea Air admits to tasering unruly passengers

12 months agoLifestyle / Travel : Gulliver

CABIN crew on Korea Air flights have used electric stun guns to pacify flyers on five occasions, according to an investigation by the BBC. The report says that South Korea’s national carrier is the only big airline known to fly with such tasers on board. They were first introduced on its planes in 2002.

Hidden fees charged by hotels and airlines are bad for customers and the economy

IN A last minute scramble to cement a legacy before making way for Donald Trump, Barack Obama’s administration has been busy normalising relations with Cuba and commuting the sentences of hundreds of prisoners. It has also, more quietly, taken aim at another target: the travel industry and the hidden fees it charges.

Should films on planes be censored?

“FLYING’S very dangerous. In 1987, there were 30 airline accidents; 211 were fatalities and 230 were definitely passengers.” When “Rain Man” was released in 1988, airlines edited this scene out of the film before showing it to passengers.

Air India may segregate some women passengers for their own safety

SEGREGATION on airlines has a long history. Sometimes it is understandable. Carriers’ business models depend on them drawing a curtain between those of us stuffed into economy-class seats and our betters who have paid for lie-flat beds. Other times it has been immoral.

Thousands of flyers have been caught trying to smuggle loaded guns onto American planes

ON JANUARY 6th, a gunman ran amok at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, killing five people. Earlier this week, Esteban Ruiz Santiago, a 26-year-old Iraq war veteran, appeared in court charged in relation to the horrific crime. If convicted, the judge told him, he could face the death penalty.

New York’s airports may finally be upgraded

BUSINESS travellers have innumerable reasons to look forward to a visit to New York, and a few grounds to dread getting there. Chief among them are the city’s hellish airports.

British Airways crew walk out over "poverty" pay

BARRING a last-minute breakthrough, about 2,500 cabin crew members employed by British Airways (BA) will strike this week over alleged “poverty pay” at the airline. Workers originally planned walkouts for the Christmas period, but suspended the action to consider a revised pay offer.

MasterCard might estimate passengers’ weight for airlines based on what they buy

FIRMS must tread lightly around the subject of their customers’ weight. It is a sensitive subject for many. Still, a lot of organisations would like to be able to size up those who use their services.

Plastic planes will allow airlines to increase cabin pressure

A FELLOW Gulliver, cheery chap that he is, kicked off the new year explaining why 2017 might be even worse for business travellers than the year we have just put behind us.

Virtual-reality headsets on planes mean we can isolate ourselves from irritating cabin-mates

IN THE early days of commercial flight, people would dress up to take to the air and marvel at the fact that they, members of a heretofore land-bound species, were flying through the sky. Nowadays we clamour for the opposite mindset: one in which we do our best to pretend we are not flying at all. Such denial has moved a step closer.

2017 might be even worse for business travellers than 2016

THE YEAR 2016 was not a great one for business travellers. In Britain, the Brexit referendum and related collapse in the value of the pound made travelling abroad costly; transport strikes meant getting around was an ordeal for those who stayed put.

Why President Trump might be a boon for autonomous vehicles

DONALD TRUMP’S election has generated much uncertainty about the future of travel to America, but one group of travellers might have reason to celebrate: those who hope to ride in driverless cars. The Obama administration hasn’t exactly cracked down on this emerging technology.

A domestic flight in Libya turns into a European hijacking crisis

NEWS that a domestic flight operated by Afriqiyah Airways, a state-owned Libyan airline, has been hijacked and flown to Europe should shock and appal an industry that has, since 9/11, spared no expense to end the scourge of such horrors.

More Americans will be flying over Christmas. Can airports cope?

SOME 45.2m passengers are expected to fly on America's airlines during the three-week holiday season that began last Friday. That is 3.5% more than flew during the same period last year, adding volume to an already-high baseline: the days around Christmas and New Year typically see 23% more travel than the rest of the year.

A YouTube star says he was forced off a flight for speaking Arabic

DELTA AIR LINES found itself at the centre of a social-media storm when Adam Saleh, a YouTube personality who posts about life as a Muslim American, was removed from one of its flights for—apparently—no greater crime than speaking Arabic.

The best cities for some last-minute Christmas shopping

CHRISTMAS in New York is a time when, in the words of Meyer Berger, the city tries “to match the gems from her endless treasure chest against the winking and sparking brilliants in Heaven's vault”.

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