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Blog Profile / Leviathan


URL :http://www.economist.com/blogs/leviathan
Filed Under:Local Interest / England
Posts on Regator:74
Posts / Week:0.5
Archived Since:April 18, 2011

Blog Post Archive

A day with the tent tendency

THE tent city on the western side of St Paul's Cathedral is thickly carpeted with colourful bivouacs and placards declaring war on bankers, global capitalism and much else besides. “Capitalism is Crisis,” reads the main banner. “Capitalism is anti-empathy!” proclaims another, and “Bankers are the Mubaraks of the West”. Show More Summary

Pisa envy

RESEARCH comparing educational achievement between countries is growing. Our correspondents discuss the lessons from one recent study

Keep calm, keep moving.

LEVIATHAN spent the past two days among delegates at a global health-care conference hosted by KPMG, a consultancy. Struck often by the many fiddly differences between health-care systems, the event reminded her that many principles and the problems of health-care reform now cross international boundaries. Show More Summary

Paying the price for women

THE pay-gap debate has long centred on the on the premise that although matters have improved since the 1960s, women still earn less than men doing the same work. The economics of this claim are most dubious. Were it the case, the best...Show More Summary

Can't pay, won't pay

BUDGETS come and go. Tax rises and tax cuts in austere times tend to balance out. But George Osborne's budget today contained a big idea that could help transform Britain's regional reliance on state-funded jobs and boost the sleepy private sector in these places. Show More Summary

Why the civil service is home to the new Mona Lotts

DOES Sir Bob Kerslake as the new head of Britain's domestic civil service feel ready for the unvarnished truth about the organisation he heads? Leviathan hopes so: a new survey may make him brace himself. The civil service, once the “safe” career choice for Britons oiling the wheels of the state machinery, is not in chipper mood. Show More Summary

Two very different ways to bash Mr Lansley's health bill

A MORE than usually terrifying assault on Andrew Lansley's ragged health and social care bill in the Lancet claims that it is in fact a Trojan horse for private companies taking over key services and ruining the principle that health care should be free at the point of delivery. Show More Summary

Lord Patten ruffles the Beeb's feathers

THE BBC's chairman Lord Patten has had an eventful week. On Monday, he confirmed The Economist's report of two weeks ago (“Auntie's Big Year”) that he was already looking for a new Director General to succeed Mark Thompson, the present incumbent. Show More Summary

Paying the price for women

The pay gap debate has long centred on the on the premise that while matters have improved since the 1960s, women still earn less than men doing the same work. The economics of this claim are most dubious. Were it the case, the bestShow More Summary

A naked challenge to Lord Leveson

THE waiting for Lord Justice Leveson’s conclusions after his inquiry into the ethics and conduct of Britain’s press is nearly over. Already, a tempting glimpse of his conclusions is on offer. The Media Guardian website reports that under...Show More Summary

All change at the Beeb

SUCH a soft, pre-Olympic landing has the BBC’s new director general enjoyed, that many licence-fee payers probably haven't noticed that George Entwistle will take the helm at the corporation next month. Formally, Mr Entwistle can put his feet up until September. Show More Summary

How Dave's Big Society dream turned small

LARGELY unremarked among the greater political dramas, the coalition's Big Society aspirations have undergone a health-check and being found sorely wanting by the public accounts committee, which monitors progress of the big idea. In...Show More Summary

How to cut the tax rate: a 1980s guide

AS THE political argument about Britain's top tax rates heats up (see the article in The Economist this week), your blogger's attention has turned to previous occasions on which received thinking on taxation abruptly changed. The March 1988 budget saw the top tax rate slashed from 60% to 40%. Show More Summary

General Patten goes to war on the BBC's top brass

WHILE the gruesome fate of Britain's tabloids is played out with full furore this week, another British media institution is being re-made more quietly, but still definitively. The new BBC Trust chairman, Lord Patten, has delivered his first major speech. Show More Summary

Proprietors, politicians and a very cosy crew

DAVID Cameron’s appearance at the Leveson inquiry this morning followed a succession of classy political warm-up acts, from Sir John Major, to Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. All have appeared before Lord Justice Leveson’s probe into the culture, practices and ethics of the press this week. Show More Summary

Politics, Bias and the Beeb

AN online campaign has attracted more than 35,000 signatures for a petition directed at the BBC. That is many times the number who wrote to the Corporation, complaining that its coverage of the Queen's diamond jubilee was in parts a bit dim and fronted by slightly-informed presenters, more suited to daytime TV than magisterial events. Show More Summary

And they're off: the BBC's Grand National

THE deadline for applying to the job of BBC director general has passed. Now on with the real race, which will give the world’s biggest broadcaster outside China a new suit at the top, and the Trust (hopes its chairman Lord Patten) a fresh sense of purpose and strategy in the run-up to the organisation’s charter renewal in 2017. Show More Summary

Can't Pay, Won't Pay

BUDGETS come and go. Tax rises and tax cuts in austerity times tend to balance out. But George Osborne’s budget today contained one major idea which could be a major contributor to transforming Britain’s public-private sector ratio and...Show More Summary

Why the civil service is home to the new Mona Lotts

DOES Sir Bob Kerslake as the new head of Britain’s domestic civil service feel ready for the unvarnished truth about the organisation he heads? Leviathan hopes so: a new survey may make him brace himself. The civil service, once the “safe” career choice for Britons oiling the wheels of the state machinery, is not in chipper mood. Show More Summary

Two very different ways to bash Mr Lansley's health bill

A MORE than usually terrifying assault on Andrew Lansley’s ragged health and social care bill in The Lancet claims that it is in fact a Trojan horse for private companies taking over key services and ruining the principle that health care should be free at the point of delivery. Show More Summary

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