Blog Profile / Electric Archaeology


URL :http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Archaeology
Posts on Regator:184
Posts / Week:0.9
Archived Since:July 9, 2011

Blog Post Archive

Problems with low-friction AR

Ok. I’ve had a bit of feedback from folks. The issues seem to be: audio doesn’t always load locations don’t always trigger Those are two big issues. I’m not entirely sure what to do about them. I just spun up a story that takes place around the quad here; I took the Ottawa Anomaly code […]

On haunts & low-friction AR – thinking out loud

The frightening news is that we are living in a story. The reassuring part is that it’s a story we’re writing ourselves. Alas, though, most of us don’t even know it – or are afraid to accept it. Never before did we have so much access to the tools of storytelling – yet few of […]

Low Friction Augmented Reality

Maybe you’ve thought, ‘Augmented reality – meh’. I’ve thought that too. Peeping through my tablet or phone’s screen at a 3d model displayed on top of the viewfinder… it can be neat, but as Stu wrote years ago, [with regard to ‘Streetmuseum’, a lauded AR app overlaying historic London on modern London] …it is really […]

archaeogaming unconference – logistics

The #archaeogaming unconference will take place here: https://unhangout.media.mit.edu/event/archaeogaming at 11 am, EST, June 1st; y’all are welcome to throw together other spaces (hangouts, skype, collaborative docs, etherpads, what have you) to extend or push the idea further. Show More Summary

Fumbling towards Virtuality

With apologies to Sarah. So the Oculus Rift arrived some time ago. What with conferences and illness, I didn’t really get to play with it until today. I followed all directions, and eventually got the damned thing wired to my 5 yr old Windows 7 machine. I know, I know. Yes mom, this is work. […]

an #archaeogaming unconference

This is probably madness, but what the hell. Given the interest this past week in the intersection(s) of archaeology and gaming that seemed to be happening across various blogs & across the twittersphere, it occurred to me that this was a really good opportunity for me to learn how to throw a virtual unconference. (Wasn’t […]

Grabbing data from Open Context

This morning, on Twitter, there was a conversation about site diaries and the possibilities of topic modeling for extracting insight from them. Open Context has 2618 diaries – here’s one of them. Eric, who runs Open Context, has an excellent API for all that kind of data. Append.json on the end of a file […]

a quick note on visualizing topic models as self organizing map

I wanted to visualize topic models as a self-organizing map. This code snippet was helpful. (Here’s its blog post). In my standard topic modeling script in R, I added this: which gives something like this: Things to be desired: I don’t know which circle represents what document. Each pie slice represents a topic. If you […]

Calling for #archaeogames – some thoughts on potential processes

Some months ago, I was talking with a colleague about the changing landscape of academic publishing. I was encouraging her to try some of these various open access and/or post-publication peer review and/or open peer review experiments that I’ve published in. Like any true believer, I was a bit annoying. A lot annoying. To which […]

ludi incipiant! a call for #archaeogames?

Let’s play a game. In the wake of the #saa2015 #archaeogaming hashtag (as well as #ctp2015, ‘challenge the past’), and indeed Heritage Jam, I’ve been thinking about how awesome it would be to have a collection of papers dealing with archaeogaming (as Andrew defines it). Such things exist (although, as I tap this out, I can’t […]

How to split a csv file

If you’re on a PC, the instructions we posted here: http://www.themacroscope.org/?page_id=418 work. It’s a macro, in visual basic, for excel. But after a long back and forth yesterday with @thomasgpadilla we worked out that it would break in various Mac versions of Excel. Why? I do not know. But there’s a pretty simple command line sequence on a […]

Crafting Digital History version 0.5: Some Final Projects

So the experiment of teaching data mining & visualization to history students – which will be rebranded ‘crafting digital history’ in its next iteration in order to attract a broader spectrum of students and to more accurately reflect what we’re doing – is done. There’ve been some great moments, like when Matt forked one of […]

Macroscopic approaches to archaeological histories: insights into archaeological practice from digital methods [SAA session 200]

Going to the SAA? Why not stop in on session 200 on Friday morning, April 17? Room: Golden Gate 3 Time: 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM Chair: Shawn Graham Participants: 10:30 Tom Brughmans—Off the Beaten Track: Exploring what Lies Outside Paths of Most Frequently Cited Publications in Citation Networks 10:45 Joshua Wells, David Anderson, Eric Kansa, Sarah […]

The Original Big Data

I’m speaking tomorrow at Carleton U’s Data Day. I’m the only historian/humanist/archaeologist/whatever on the ticket. I can’t even stay for the full event, because I teach (my #hist3907b students are showing off their term projects!). Last year, I felt the speakers at the event were dismissive towards the humanities. @electricarchaeo we need less infighting & […]

HIST3907O ‘Digital History Research Methods’ or, Crafting Digital History

(I really need to work on my course titles.) Registration is open! Join me next winter, online, to learn how to craft digital history. You can just follow along if you don’t want to pay tuition – all my materials will be openly available/copyable/remixable. If you need a university transfer credit, that (probably) can be […]

Somewhere in the desert… a temple

My minecraft expedition was a success. Let me share some observations. Firstly -> I seeded the wrong world. I used Double Village as seed for ‘large biomes’ when I should have used it for ‘default’. Reading the map incorrectly happens all the time in landscape archaeology though. Transpose some digits, and soon you’re hundreds of […]

Somewhere in the desert…

At the upcoming SAA in San Fracisco, Andrew Rheinhard and I are participating in a forum on digital public archaeology. Our piece, ‘Playing Pedagogy: Videogaming as site and vehicle for digital public archaeology’ is still in a process of becoming. Our original abstract: While there is an extensive literature on the pedagogical uses of video games […]

‘Teaching 1613, An Algorithmic Incoherence’, or, the results of an experiment in automatic transcription

I loaded the audio of the opening remarks I made at last year’s Champlain Colloquium at Carleton into Youtube, to see what Google’s automatic transcription would make of it. Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you, ‘Teaching 1613, An Algorithmic Incoherence’ 0:00 maize from these critical encounters I’m yours and 0:04 think back to my high […]

The Data Driven DJ

The ‘Data Driven DJ‘ project is brilliant. I can see so much potential in it. I intend to write more about it soonish, but you should go and look at this project now. Run. Don’t walk! Watch this: Also, note this: I don’t have very specific guidelines for this, but I’m generally looking for these […]

Rocker and Docker and Daemons …. oh my!

I’m teaching a course at the moment on data mining, visualization, and other sundry topics. Right now, the course takes place in the physical world but this time next year, it will be a completely online course (and students at Carleton U, U Waterloo and Brock U will be able to take it for credit […]

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