Blog Profile / Electric Archaeology


URL :http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Archaeology
Posts on Regator:170
Posts / Week:0.9
Archived Since:July 9, 2011

Blog Post Archive

HIST3907O ‘Digital History Research Methods’ or, Crafting Digital History

(I really need to work on my course titles.) Registration is open! Join me next winter, online, to learn how to craft digital history. You can just follow along if you don’t want to pay tuition – all my materials will be openly available/copyable/remixable. If you need a university transfer credit, that (probably) can be […]

Somewhere in the desert… a temple

My minecraft expedition was a success. Let me share some observations. Firstly -> I seeded the wrong world. I used Double Village as seed for ‘large biomes’ when I should have used it for ‘default’. Reading the map incorrectly happens all the time in landscape archaeology though. Transpose some digits, and soon you’re hundreds of […]

Somewhere in the desert…

At the upcoming SAA in San Fracisco, Andrew Rheinhard and I are participating in a forum on digital public archaeology. Our piece, ‘Playing Pedagogy: Videogaming as site and vehicle for digital public archaeology’ is still in a process of becoming. Our original abstract: While there is an extensive literature on the pedagogical uses of video games […]

‘Teaching 1613, An Algorithmic Incoherence’, or, the results of an experiment in automatic transcription

I loaded the audio of the opening remarks I made at last year’s Champlain Colloquium at Carleton into Youtube, to see what Google’s automatic transcription would make of it. Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you, ‘Teaching 1613, An Algorithmic Incoherence’ 0:00 maize from these critical encounters I’m yours and 0:04 think back to my high […]

The Data Driven DJ

The ‘Data Driven DJ‘ project is brilliant. I can see so much potential in it. I intend to write more about it soonish, but you should go and look at this project now. Run. Don’t walk! Watch this: Also, note this: I don’t have very specific guidelines for this, but I’m generally looking for these […]

Rocker and Docker and Daemons …. oh my!

I’m teaching a course at the moment on data mining, visualization, and other sundry topics. Right now, the course takes place in the physical world but this time next year, it will be a completely online course (and students at Carleton U, U Waterloo and Brock U will be able to take it for credit […]

Hearing the Past

what follows is our draft chapter for ‘Seeing the Past‘, a colloquium hosted by Kevin Kee at Brock University. The chapter will eventually be published in ‘Seeing the Past: Augmented Reality and Computer Vision in History’ http://kevinkee.ca/seeing-the-past/book-abstract/ comments welcome. Hearing the Past – S Graham, S Eve, C Morgan, A Pantos This volume is about seeing […]

Sherlock Holmes, Samuel Vimes, and Archaeological Equifinality

Sherlock: How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth? Sam Vimes: … he distrusted the kind of person who’d take one look at another man and say in a lordly voice to his companion, ‘Ah, my dear sir, I can tell […]

Text Analysis of the Grand Jury Documents

I watched Twitter and the CBC while the prosecutor was reading his statement. I watched the live feeds from Ferguson, and other cities around the US. Back in August, when this all first began, I was glued to my computer, several feeds going at once. A spectator. Yesterday, Mitch Fraas put the grand jury documents […]

A Digital Archaeology of Digital Archaeology: work in progress

Ethan Watrall and I have been playing around with data mining as a way of writing a historiography of digital & computational archaeology. We’d like to invite you to play along. We’ll probably have something to say on this at the SAA in April. Anyway, we’ve just been chugging along slowly, sharing the odd email, […]

Breakage

I was at #seeingthepast these last two days (website). During one of the discussions, the idea of glitchiness of augmented reality was raised, and ways that this might intersect with materiality were explored. At one point, the idea of an app that let people break museum objects (the better to know them and how they […]

I’m no MacGyver

I’m no MacGyver. Tim the Tool Man? Bill Nye, Science Guy? Hell, I’m nowhere near Heinz Doofenshmirtz. Or Phineas. I’d kill to be Ferb. Wile. E. Coyote? Brain? Possibly Pinky. I’m not handy. But I thought I could do Google Cardboard. Print out the template. Glue it to a sheet of cardboard. Cut. Fold. VR! […]

On Academic Blogging – a Conversation with Matt Burton

Matt Burton, who is working on new web genres and informal scholarly communication, asked me some questions recently as part of his research. We thought it would be interesting to share our conversation. MB: When did you start your blog (career wise: as a grad student,  undergrad, etc)? I recently pulled my entire blog archive […]

What Careers Need History?

We have a new website at CU today; one of the interesting things on it is a page under the ‘admissions’ section that describes many careers and the departments whose program might fit you for such a career. I was interested to know what careers were listed as needing a history degree. Updated Oct 17: […]

Historical Maps, Topography, Into Minecraft: QGIS

Building your Minecraft Topography(An earlier version of this uses Microdem, which is just a huge page in the butt. I re-wrote this using Qgis, for my hist3812a students) If you are trying to recreate a world as recorded in a historical map, then modern topography isn’t what you want. Instead, you need to create a […]

Open Notebooks Part V: Notational Velocity and 1 superRobot

The thought occurred that not everyone wants to take their notes in Scrivener. You might prefer the simple elegance and speed of Notational Velocity, for instance. Yet, when it comes time to integrate those notes, to interrogate those notes, to rearrange them to see what kind of coherent structure you might have, Scrivener is hard […]

Open Notebooks Part IV – autogenerating a table of contents

I’ve got MDWiki installed as the public face of my open notebook. Getting it installed was easy, but I made it hard, and so I’ll have to collect my thoughts and remember exactly what I did… but, as I recall, it was this bit I found in the documentation that got me going: First off, […]

Open notebooks part III

I’ve sussed the Scrivener syncing issue by moving the process of converting out of the syncing folder (remember, not the actual project folder, but the ‘sync to external folder’). I then have created four automator applications to push my stuff to github in lovely markdown. Another thing I’ve learned today: when writing in Scrivener, just […]

An Open Research Notebook Workflow with Scrivener and Github Part 2: Now With Dillinger.io!

A couple of updates: First item The four scripts that sparkygetsthegirl crafted allow him to 1. write in Scrivener, 2. sync to a Dropbox folder, 3. Convert to md, 4. then open those md files on an android table to write/edit/add 5. and then reconvert to rtf for syncing back into Scrivener. I wondered to […]

An Open Research Notebook Workflow with Scrivener and Github

I like Scrivener. I really like being able to have my research and my writing in the same place, and most of all, I like being able to re-arrange the cards until I start to see the ideas fall into place. I’m a bit of a visual learner, I suppose. (Which makes it ironic that […]

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