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Blog Profile / Electric Archaeology


URL :http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/
Filed Under:Academics / Archaeology
Posts on Regator:162
Posts / Week:0.9
Archived Since:July 9, 2011

Blog Post Archive

Text Analysis of the Grand Jury Documents

I watched Twitter and the CBC while the prosecutor was reading his statement. I watched the live feeds from Ferguson, and other cities around the US. Back in August, when this all first began, I was glued to my computer, several feeds going at once. A spectator. Yesterday, Mitch Fraas put the grand jury documents […]

A Digital Archaeology of Digital Archaeology: work in progress

Ethan Watrall and I have been playing around with data mining as a way of writing a historiography of digital & computational archaeology. We’d like to invite you to play along. We’ll probably have something to say on this at the SAA in April. Anyway, we’ve just been chugging along slowly, sharing the odd email, […]

Breakage

I was at #seeingthepast these last two days (website). During one of the discussions, the idea of glitchiness of augmented reality was raised, and ways that this might intersect with materiality were explored. At one point, the idea of an app that let people break museum objects (the better to know them and how they […]

I’m no MacGyver

I’m no MacGyver. Tim the Tool Man? Bill Nye, Science Guy? Hell, I’m nowhere near Heinz Doofenshmirtz. Or Phineas. I’d kill to be Ferb. Wile. E. Coyote? Brain? Possibly Pinky. I’m not handy. But I thought I could do Google Cardboard. Print out the template. Glue it to a sheet of cardboard. Cut. Fold. VR! […]

On Academic Blogging – a Conversation with Matt Burton

Matt Burton, who is working on new web genres and informal scholarly communication, asked me some questions recently as part of his research. We thought it would be interesting to share our conversation. MB: When did you start your blog (career wise: as a grad student,  undergrad, etc)? I recently pulled my entire blog archive […]

What Careers Need History?

We have a new website at CU today; one of the interesting things on it is a page under the ‘admissions’ section that describes many careers and the departments whose program might fit you for such a career. I was interested to know what careers were listed as needing a history degree. Updated Oct 17: […]

Historical Maps, Topography, Into Minecraft: QGIS

Building your Minecraft Topography(An earlier version of this uses Microdem, which is just a huge page in the butt. I re-wrote this using Qgis, for my hist3812a students) If you are trying to recreate a world as recorded in a historical map, then modern topography isn’t what you want. Instead, you need to create a […]

Open Notebooks Part V: Notational Velocity and 1 superRobot

The thought occurred that not everyone wants to take their notes in Scrivener. You might prefer the simple elegance and speed of Notational Velocity, for instance. Yet, when it comes time to integrate those notes, to interrogate those notes, to rearrange them to see what kind of coherent structure you might have, Scrivener is hard […]

Open Notebooks Part IV – autogenerating a table of contents

I’ve got MDWiki installed as the public face of my open notebook. Getting it installed was easy, but I made it hard, and so I’ll have to collect my thoughts and remember exactly what I did… but, as I recall, it was this bit I found in the documentation that got me going: First off, […]

Open notebooks part III

I’ve sussed the Scrivener syncing issue by moving the process of converting out of the syncing folder (remember, not the actual project folder, but the ‘sync to external folder’). I then have created four automator applications to push my stuff to github in lovely markdown. Another thing I’ve learned today: when writing in Scrivener, just […]

An Open Research Notebook Workflow with Scrivener and Github Part 2: Now With Dillinger.io!

A couple of updates: First item The four scripts that sparkygetsthegirl crafted allow him to 1. write in Scrivener, 2. sync to a Dropbox folder, 3. Convert to md, 4. then open those md files on an android table to write/edit/add 5. and then reconvert to rtf for syncing back into Scrivener. I wondered to […]

An Open Research Notebook Workflow with Scrivener and Github

I like Scrivener. I really like being able to have my research and my writing in the same place, and most of all, I like being able to re-arrange the cards until I start to see the ideas fall into place. I’m a bit of a visual learner, I suppose. (Which makes it ironic that […]

Open Notebooks

This post is more a reminder to me that anything you’d like to read, but anyway- I want to make my research more open, more reproducible, and more accessible. I work from several locations, so I want to have all my stuff easily to hand. I work on a Mac (sometimes) a PC (sometimes) and […]

On Teaching High School

“Hey! Hey Sir!” Some words just cut right to the cerebellum. ‘Sir’ is not normally one of them, but I was at the Shawville Fair, and ‘sir’ isn’t often used in the midway. I turned, and saw before me a student from ten years previously. We chatted; he was married, had a step daughter, another […]

Setting the groundwork for an undergraduate thesis project

We have a course code, HIST4910, for students doing their undergraduate thesis project. This project can take the form of an essay, it can be a digital project, it could be code, it could be in the form of any of the manifold ways digital history/humanities research is communicated. Hollis Peirce will be working with […]

Play along at home with #hist3812a

In my video games and history class, I assign each week one or two major pieces that I want everyone to read. Each week, a subset of the class has to attempt a ‘challenge’, which involves reading a bit more, reflecting, and devising a way of making their argument – a procedural rhetoric – via […]

Web Seer and the Zeitgeist

I’ve been playing all evening with Web Seer, a toy that lets you contrast pairs of Google autocomplete suggestions. As is well known, Google autocomplete suggests completions based on what others have been searching for given that pattern of text you are entering. This is sparking some thoughts on how I might use this to think […]

SAA 2015: Macroscopic approaches to archaeological histories: Insights into archaeological practice from digital methods

Ben Marwick and I are organizing a session for the SAA2015 (the 80th edition, this year in San Francisco) on “Macroscopic approaches to archaeological histories: Insights into archaeological practice from digital methods”. It’s a pretty big tent. Below is the session ID and the abstract. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in, why […]

Historical Maps into Minecraft: My Workflow

The folks at the New York Public Library have a workflow and python script for translating historical maps into Minecraft. It’s a three-step (quite big steps) process. First, they generate a DEM (digital elevation model) from the historical map, using QGIS. This is saved as ‘elevation.tiff’. Then, using Inkscape, they trace over the features from […]

Assessing my upcoming seminar on the Illicit Antiquities trade, HIST4805b

So I’m putting together the syllabus for my illicit antiquities seminar. This is where I think I’m going with the course, which starts in less than a month (eep!). The first part is an attempt to revitalize my classroom blogging, and to formally tie it into the discussion within the classroom – that is, something […]

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