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Blog Profile / Civil War Memory


URL :http://cwmemory.com/
Filed Under:History / US History
Posts on Regator:2660
Posts / Week:7.6
Archived Since:March 3, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Return of ‘Military Campaigns of the Civil War’ Series

I’ve been a fan of Gary Gallagher’s edited series, Military Campaigns of the Civil War, from the beginning. The individual volumes introduced me to some of the most interesting historians in the field and went far in shaping what I know about Civil War military history and how I think about battles and campaigns. So, […]

Did Slavery Doom the Confederacy?

In this brief video clip Eric Foner talks with one of his graduate students about the crucial role slavery played in the formation and defeat of the Confederacy. Included is a reference to the debate surrounding the recruitment of slaves into the army. The reference to McCurry is Stephanie McCurry’s, Confederate Reckoning: Power and Politics […]

Treating Jefferson Davis as Commander in Chief

Steven Hahn reviewed James McPherson’s new book about Jefferson Davis in yesterday’s New York Times. It includes nothing out of the ordinary from a typical academic review in a popular publication until you reach the very end. I found this to be somewhat curious. Yet, there is a larger and more unsettling issue. Treating Davis […]

“America Is Not the Greatest Country in the World”

A couple weeks ago this short clip from the HBO series, “The Newsroom”, was posted by a couple of my Facebook friends. I’ve never seen the show so I don’t know much of anything about the storyline beyond the obvious. The topic of American Exceptionalism has come up on this blog before and it always […]

“Every 3.6 Minutes”

I’ve always struggled with the way I teach the history of slavery to high school students. Pushing my students toward what I hope is a meaningful overview of slavery’s evolution and eventual demise inevitably overshadows change over time, regional differences, and even runs the risk of minimizing the horror of slavery itself. This last category […]

Looking For Conflict Along Sherman’s March

I’ve said it before. Mainstream media can’t help but report a Civil War related story without resorting to the popular meme of an “unfinished war.” Americans are supposedly still fighting the war. This afternoon I caught this interview with Professor James Cobb of the University of Georgia, who discussed the history and especially the legacy […]

The Re-Construction of Sherman’s March

This is as solid an essay as you will find on the history and legacy of Sherman’s March. And yet there is something missing in this story. The destruction caused by Sherman’s army almost always eclipses the rebuilding that took place immediately following the war. In his excellent book, The Iron Way: Railroads, the Civil […]

New To the Civil War Memory Library, 11/17

Congratulations to fellow blogger and historian, Keith Harris, on the publication of his new book. It’s always nice to see hard work rewarded and I hope Keith is enjoying that feeling of holding a new hardcover book. I’ve made my way through the first chapter and can’t recommend it enough. Keith’s work fits neatly into […]

How High Schools Can Talk About the Confederate Flag

It seems like you can’t go a week without reading a story about a student who has decided to bring a Confederate flag to school or wear clothing with the symbol prominently displayed. Over the past few years the number of reported stories has increased in frequency. More interesting, these incidents have spread well beyond […]

The History of Sherman’s March is Finally Becoming History

Yesterday the New York Times published a piece by Alan Blinder on Southern memory of Sherman’s March and the new marker commemorating its 150th anniversary. The article pretty much raises the same questions about our Civil War memory in the South as other events during the sesquicentennial. The theme of the article is struggle. White […]

“It Is a Surrender Of the Entire Slavery Question”

On March 24, 1865, Robert Toombs wrote a letter to a friend in Virginia expressing his frustration with Jefferson Davis and the recently passed legislation that allowed the Confederate government to recruit freed slaves into the army. Toombs’s arguments closely aligns with public statements made by Howell Cobb and James A. Seddon. Interestingly, Toombs’s letter […]

Not Your Grandfather’s “March to the Sea”

This week the Georgia Historical Society will dedicate the latest in its series of roadside markers commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. The marker featured above, commemorating the start of “Sherman’s March”, will be located on the grounds of the Jimmy Carter library. It reads: On November 15, 1864, during the Civil War, […]

Black Confederates in the Journal of the Civil War Era

Looks like the latest issue of The Journal of the Civil War Era is being mailed to subscribers. The Professional Notes section features my essay, “Black Confederates Out of the Attic and Into the Mainstream,” which briefly explores the evolution of the myth, its diffusion on the Internet, and why academic and public historians ought […]

Standing Up For Citations (follow up)

Last month I posted a brief item about a couple of reviews of Karen Abbott’s new book, which took issue with her citations. Both Jonathan Yardley and Ashleigh Whitehead Luskey pointed out that a few passages lacked proper citation or that specific sources deserved further interrogation to support corresponding claims. I was most interested in... Continue reading

Nine Years Blogging

It’s becoming more and more difficult to remember a time when my interest in the Civil War did not somehow connect to blogging. Nine years ago I had just completed a Master’s degree, including a thesis on William Mahone and the battle of the Crater, at the University of Richmond. I thought blogging might give... Continue reading

Robert Lee Hodge on Reenacting

You all know the name. Hodge occupies a special place in the reenacting community given his appearance on the cover of Tony Horwitz’s book, Confederates in the Attic (1998). In this Civil War in4 video he makes an incredibly compelling argument for the value of Civil War reenacting. [Uploaded to Vimeo on November 5, 2014]

North Carolinians Knew It Was a Rebellion

How many times have you been told that the proper way to refer to our civil war is the “War Between the States”? The folks who insist on it almost always assume they are speaking for their ancestors. We don’t need to go into the arguments for or against it here. In 1914, North Carolinians... Continue reading

A Meeting Between Grant and Lee

It’s probably safe to assume that a recreation of the meeting between Grant and Lee in Wilmer McLean’s home at Appomattox Court House will be part of the sesquicentennial anniversary next April. Unlike the video below, the performance will likely stick to a well vetted script that adheres close to the available historical record. There... Continue reading

Will Civil War Reenactors Surrender at Appomattox in 2015?

Last week I learned of the retirement of long time Robert E. Lee impersonator, Al Stone. Mr. Stone plans on using the 150th anniversary of Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House as the backdrop for his final performance. I’ve noticed an uptick in stories from around the country that plan on using this particular anniversary […]

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