Blog Profile / Civil War Memory


URL :http://cwmemory.com/
Filed Under:History / US History
Posts on Regator:1879
Posts / Week:4.3
Archived Since:March 3, 2008

Blog Post Archive

Silas Chandler in BuzzFeed News

This morning BuzzFeed published an extensive and thoughtful essay about Silas Chandler and his place in the black Confederate narrative by Adam Serwer. Serwer carefully explores the available sources related to Silas’s time in the war, but he also does an excellent job of untangling the many myths that have surfaced in connection with the […]

Gary Gallagher on Confederate Monuments

Gary Gallagher was recently interviewed on the current debate in Charlottesville, Virginia over the future of Confederate monuments. Gallagher makes a strong case for contextualizing these sites rather than removing the monuments. I agree entirely with Gallagher that interpretation of these sites can help us to better understand the tough questions related to the history […]

Could This Man Be Silas Chandler?

Recently I went through some old email correspondence related to my research on black Confederates. All the way back in 2011 Andy Hall emailed a link to two sketches that appeared in the Illustrated London Times from 1865. The first sketch depicts Jefferson Davis “signing acts of government” while on the run following the abandonment […]

Gary Gallagher to Lecture ‘About Us’

Tomorrow afternoon Gary Gallagher will deliver a lecture on his home turf of the University of Virginia on the state of Civil War history. As you can see by the title of his talk, this promises to be an entertaining lecture and one that has the potential to ruffle a few feathers. For some of […]

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 04/10

Over the weekend, Martha Hodes’s wonderful book, Mourning Lincoln, was once again honored, this time with the OAH’s Avery O. Craven Award. This is one of my favorite memory studies of the past few years. Daniel W. Crofts, Lincoln and the Politics of Slavery: The Other Thirteenth Amendment and the Struggle to Save the Union […]

Another Moment in #ConfederateHeritageMonth

This year twitter has been embraced by folks who disapprove of state and local governments that have issued proclamations recognizing April as Confederate Heritage Month. The hashtag #ConfederateHeritageMonth has produced a healthy clip of tweets over the past few weeks. I have added a few of my own ‘Another Moment in Confederate Heritage Month” tweets, […]

Banned From Black Confederates Facebook Group

This morning I decided to join a new Facebook group devoted to black Confederate soldiers. Once approved I responded to two posts. The first, not surprisingly, was a re-posting of the Atlanta Black Star piece that I commented on earlier this week. I simply noted that the accompanying image was that of Union soldiers and […]

Making Lincoln Great Again

This is from a recent interview that Donald Trump gave to The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward. I think it is safe to say that Woodward knew not to follow up on Trump’s response. Like just about everything else that comes out of his mouth, this is both horrifying and hilarious. […]

Atlanta Black Star Falls For Black Confederate Myth

Recently I shared a story out of Chattanooga, TN about the uncovering of what was determined by the Sons of Confederate Veterans to be the tombstone of a black Confederate soldier. As is the case with other stories, within a day the article was picked up by a local news […]

Redefining Confederate History Month in Mississippi

Last month I reported on efforts to add an interpretive plaque to the Confederate soldier statue on the campus of the University of Mississippi. At the time I expressed some concerns as did others. It was unfortunate that the school’s history department was not consulted, but today they released a […]

Another Take on “Lee’s Lost Order”

History recently launched a new comedy series called, “Crossroads of History.” This particular episode explores Lee’s famous Lost Order and stars Ben Feldman, who you may remember from Mad Men. It contains a few funny moments. [Uploaded to Vimeo on April 2, 2015]

“The Road From Appomattox” Symposium

All five presentations from this year’s Civil War symposium held recently at the Library of Virginia are now available for viewing via C-SPAN. The event was titled, “The Road from Appomattox: Political Violence, Military Conflict, and National Reunion”. They are all worth watching. Edward L. Ayers, “Reckoning with Reconstruction and […]

New Book Project for Public Historians

I don’t believe I have said much of anything about it on this site, but in addition to my book project on the myth of the Black Confederate soldier I have also been working on a proposal for a collection of essays on interpreting the Civil War at museums and […]

If Donald Trump Had Delivered the Gettysburg Address

This little gem comes to us from The Angry Staff Officer blog. It was re-posted on George Takei’s Facebook page. All I can say is enjoy. It was a long time ago – I don’t think anyone can even remember, but I can remember, I have a great memory, I’ve […]

Benjamin Butler on the Big Stage

The decision on the part of Benjamin Butler to declare slaves as contraband of war at Fort Monroe, Virginia in the spring of 1861 received a good deal of attention during the sesquicentennial and is now interpreted by the National Park Service. Historians now refer to the actions of three […]

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 03/26

I am very excited to see that Stephen Sears is slated to release a new book early next year. It is titled, Lincoln’s Lieutenants: The High Command of the Army of the Potomac. Sears has always been one of my favorite Civil War writers. Matthew Desmond, Evicted: Poverty and Profit […]

A Very Small Army of Black Rebels

One of the topics that I take up in the final chapter of my book about Confederate camp slaves and the Myth of the Black Confederate Soldier is the presence of a very small number of African Americans in social circles that subscribe to this myth. I have written extensively […]

A Black Confederate Soldier Who Served Two Masters

The vast majority of people who come into contact with the Myth of the Black Confederate Soldier so do through stories such as this one out of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This one is particularly useful. It’s brief and any discerning reader can easily pick out the contradictions. Let’s start at the […]

An Opportunity for the Nau Center for Civil War History

This is certainly one of those moments when I still wish I still lived in Charlottesville, Virginia. Tonight community leaders in Charlottesville will meet to urge the city council to rename Lee Park and remove the statue which was donated by Paul MacIntire in 1924. The vice mayor has come […]

More Talk About Confederate Monuments

All indications are that yesterday’s panel discussion at the annual meeting of the National Council on Public History on Confederate monuments and iconography attracted a large and engaged audience. The twitter feed from the session, however, also suggests that many left feeling frustrated. What I gathered from the conversation both […]

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