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Blog Profile / Civil War Memory


URL :http://cwmemory.com/
Filed Under:History / US History
Posts on Regator:2455
Posts / Week:7.7
Archived Since:March 3, 2008

Blog Post Archive

John Marszalek Reflects on 1864?s Person of the Year

This past February the Museum of the Confederacy hosted its annual “Person of the Year” for 1864. As you already know the audience selected William T. Sherman. The event was broadcast this weekend on C-SPAN. Here is John Marszalek reflecting on Sherman’s victory. Marszalek offers some interesting thoughts at the beginning in response to a […]

“The Knighliest of the Knightly Race”

In addition to the Jefferson Davis monument I am also going to talk briefly about the Alabama Confederate Memorial Monument (1898), which commemorates the 122,000 men from the state who fought for the Confederacy. I am going to ask my students to reflect on the ways in which these monuments reinforced the politics of Jim […]

Kids Say the Darndest Things About Robert E. Lee

Well, I guess it can be said that at least they tried. [Uploaded to YouTube on March 16, 2014] [Uploaded to YouTube on March 16, 2014]

Marcus M. Porter’s Eternal Bivouac

Yesterday students in my Civil War Memory class handed in their final projects. They are amazing and reflect a good deal of research and creativity. Students researched Civil War monuments and memorials in their own communities or designed their own for a specific location. One student created a video that explored a number of Civil […]

New To the Civil War Memory Library, 03/21

Michael C.C. Adams, Living Hell: The Dark Side of the Civil War (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014). Shauna Devine, Learning from the Wounded: The Civil War and the Rise of American Medical Science (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). Michael Kreyling, A Late Encounter with the Civil War (University of Georgia Press, 2013). Louis P. […]

Jefferson Davis Welcomes Students Studying Civil Rights Movement

On Sunday I head out with roughly 35 students and 3 colleagues for a 5-day tour of the Civil Rights South. We’ve been meeting with students to give them a broad outline of the history and questions that will be covered as we travel from Atlanta to Memphis. One of my main responsibilities will be […]

“We Learned How the South Was Right”

Looks like the Sam Davis Youth Camp is stepping up efforts to recruit children for their summer camp program. Any time an instructor proudly proclaims that participants will learn the “truth of history” you know that good old indoctrination is what is really taking place. So, is this program right for your kids? Today, General […]

Worse Than Hurricane Katrina

Earlier today the Sun Herald, which serves the Biloxi-Gulfport community in Mississippi published a pretty harsh editorial against the leadership of Beauvoir in the wake of the resignation of Jefferson Hayes-Davis. Here is the editorial in full. If I read this correctly the editors at the Sun Herald believe that the Mississippi Division, Sons of […]

Remembering the Battle of the Crater Reviewed in Civil War History

Thanks to Benjamin Cloyd – author of an excellent study of the history and memory of Civil War prisons – for the very fair review of my book in the most recent issue of Civil War History (March 2014). I should have focused much more on the intersection of the centennial and the civil rights […]

How You Apply For a Job at the Civil War Trust

I absolutely love this video, which was done as part of an application for a position with the Civil War Trust. The applicant plays off of Ken Burns’s documentary and the popular short segment featuring Sullivan Ballou’s final letter home to his wife. Good luck.

The Myth of the Black Union Soldier

Today I have a guest post at The Civil War Monitor’s “Front Lines Blog.” I’ve been meaning for some time to write a short essay about how United States Colored Troops have come to be remembered during the sesquicentennial. This is something that I can easily see expanding for my project on the sesquicentennial. It’s […]

Confederate Flag Flap at Beauvoir

All is not well at Jefferson Davis’s postwar home of Beauvoir. [The website is downright ugly.] The news article linked to here is poorly written so it is difficult to piece together the nature of the dispute, but there seems to be a rift between Bertram Hayes-Davis (the former president’s great-great-grandson) and the Mississippi Division, […]

Carry Me Back to Old Virginny

Thanks to Patrick Schroeder of the National Park Service and David Coles of Longwood University for inviting me to take part in their Civil War seminar this weekend in Farmville, Virginia. I had a wonderful time. I stayed at the Spring Grove Bed and Breakfast near Appomattox, where I enjoyed the hospitality of Emily and […]

Black Confederate Kickstarter Campaign Needs Your Help

Last month I shared an unusual Kickstarter campaign seeking funds for a children’s book about black Confederates. The campaign has until the end of this month to raise $3,000 dollars. Unfortunately, as of today only one pledge has been made for $15. This is pathetic. Where is the support? This project is perfect for white […]

Misplaced Massacre Wins Bancroft Prize

The judges for the 2014 Bancroft Prize could not have selected a better book this year. I’ve been raving about Ari Kelman’s A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling over the Memory of Sand Creek (Harvard University Press) since its publication. Here is my blurb for a “best of” list that recently appeared in The Civil War Monitor […]

Black Confederate Movement “Demented”

This weekend the University of Virginia’s Miller Center will begin airing their “Our American Forum” interview with Gary Gallagher on public TV stations across the country. The Center has uploaded a few preview clips, but I thought this clip in which Gary describes the black Confederate movement as “demented” was worth sharing. I’ve always appreciated […]

Why the Historians May Not Matter To Napolitano

I’ve already said that I think both Andrew Napolitano and Jon Stewart ought to leave the history to the historians. It will be interesting to see whether Napolitano continues to voice claims about the war that are decidedly false. The two that stand out include a mistaken belief that slavery was on the verge of […]

Why We Need Professional Historians

Last night Judge Andrew Napolitano returned to The Daily Show a week after Stewart’s segment in which he critiqued some of the judge’s most problematic claims about Lincoln and the war. You can watch the interview [and here] as well as the little game show skit featuring Napolitano and a panel of historians, including Eric […]

Has It Been An “Anemic” Civil War Sesquicentennial?

Here is another excerpt from The Civil War Trust’s interview with Gary Gallagher. Here Gary responds to a question about the impact of the sesquicentennial in comparison with the centennial. I think it’s been anemic. I don’t think many states have done much. Virginia’s done a great deal with a series of what they call […]

Now That’s A Book I Want To Read

I don’t know when this interview with Gary Gallagher took place, but this little comment caught my attention in response to the question of where further research is most needed. I’m not sure there is a big hole in the literature that’s just crying out to be filled. What’s interesting is that a book occasionally […]

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